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Full text of "Annual report of the Town of Andover"

2011 

Annual Town Report 




Town of Andover 

Massachusetts 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 27, 28, 2011 



WARRANT 

ARTICLE NO. & DESCRIPTION 



32. 
33. 

34. 

35. 

36. 

37. 
38. 

39. 

40. 

41. 

42. 
43. 
44. 
45. 
46. 



Street Acceptance - Winterberry Lane 

Storm Drain Improvements 
- $300,000 

Town Building Maintenance and 
Renovation 

Zoning By-law Amendment - 
Dimensional Special Permit/Historic 
Preservation 

Balmoral Fence & Masonry Repairs 

Parking Meter Replacement 

Spring Grove Cemetery Maintenance 
-$31,000 

Zoning By-law Amendment - OSRD 
Special Permit 

Zoning By-law Amendment - River 
Road Business Overlay District 

General By-law Amendment - Banners 
In General Business District 



ACTION 


ATTY. GENERAL 


TAKEN 


APPROVED 


Approved 




Approved 





Approved 
Defeated 

Withdraw 

Withdrawn 

Approved 

Defeated 

Withdrawn 

Approved 



Water Distribution Systems Improvements Approved 
- $500,000 



Water & Sewer Vehicles 
- $70,000 



Approved 



WTP Variable Frequency Drive Pump Approved 

-$499,099.95 



Acceptance Chapter 131, Sections 
27&28oftheActsof2010 

General By-law Amendment - Bow 
Hunting Ban 



Approved 
Defeated 



May 11,2011 



133 



TOWN OF ANDOVER 



201 1 ANNUAL REPORT 




""'Hliiillivtt^ 



PREPARED BY THE TOWN MANAGER 

PURSUANT TO THE PROVISIONS OF CFIAPTER 40, 

SECTION 49 OF THE GENERAL LAWS OF THE 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS AND 

ARTICLE II, SECTION 4 OF THE GENERAL BY-LAWS OF 

THE TOWN OF ANDOVER 



Annual Report Cover - Photograph hyAndover resident Joe Frio 

A panoramic view from Holt Hill, the highest point in Essex County, looking south towards 

the Boston skyline. Holt Hill is owned by the Trustees of Reservations. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/annualreportofto2011ando 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 1 

COMMISSION ON DISABILITY 98 

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT & PLANNING 62 

BUILDING DIVISION 62 

CONSERVATION DIVISION 64 

ELECTRICAL INSPECTION 63 

HEALTH DIVISION 66 

PLANNING DIVISION 69 

PLUMBING, GAS & SEALER OF WEIGHTS & MEASURES 63 

ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 71 

COMMUNITY SERVICES DIVISION 74 

DIRECTORY OF COMMITTEES & BOARDS 10 

DIRECTORY OF DEPARTMENT/DIVISION HEADS 9 

ELDER SERVICES DIVISION 78 

FINANCE & BUDGET 22 

ASSESSORS 22 

CENTRAL PURCHASING 23 

COLLECTOR/TREASURER 24 

FINANCIAL STATEMENTS 103 

FIRE-RESCUE 37 

FOUNDERS' DAY 19 

GREATER LAWRENCE TECHNICAL SCHOOL 95 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 97 

HOW CAN WE HELP YOU? 16 

HOW TO REACH YOUR ELECTED OFFICIALS 14 

HUMAN RESOURCES DEPARTMENT 92 

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY 61 

INSPECTION OF ANIMALS 101 



JOHN CORNELL FUEL ASSISTANCE FUND 102 

MARGARET G. TO WLE FUND . . . 102 

MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 59 

PLANT AND FACILITIES DEPARTMENT 42 

BUILDING MAINTENANCE/ELECTRICAL/MECHANICAL 43 

FACILITIES SERVICES 48 

FORESTRY 47 

PARKS & GROUNDS 46 

SPRING GROVE CEMETERY 46 

VEHICLE MAINTENANCE 48 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 33 

ANIMAL CONTROL 35 

DETECTIVE DIVISION 34 

EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 35 

OPERATIONS DIVISION 33 

RECORDS DIVISION 34 

TRIAD 35 

PRESERVATION COMMISSION 99 

PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 51 

ENGINEERING 51 

HIGHWAY 52 

SEWER 55 

SOLID WASTE /RECYCLING 56 

WATER DISTRIBUTION 55 

WATER TREATMENT PLANT 53 

PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 120 

SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 88 

TOWN CLERK 28 

TOWN COUNSEL 32 

TOWN MANAGER 3 

TOWN MEETING MINUTES/ELECTION RESULTS 129 

VETERANS SERVICES 83 

YOUTH SERVICES DIVISION 81 




TOWN OF ANDOVER 



Town Offices 

36 Bartlet Street 

Andover, MA 01810 

978-623-8225 
www. andoverma. gov 



Dear Fellow Citizens: 



In 201 1, Andover said good bye to two notable employees who through their careers each 
had a major impact on our community. First, Tony Torrisi retired after a distinguished 32 year 
career as Andover' s Director of Finance and Budgeting. Tony provided the financial leadership 
that enabled Andover to achieve and maintain the highest (AAA) bond rating. This rating which 
is held by less than 2% of Massachusetts communities enables Andover to borrow capital at the 
best interest rates thereby stretching Andover tax dollars to their fullest. Second, Joe Piantedosi 
retired after an extremely successful career as Andover' s Director of Plant & Facilities where he 
was responsible for the construction and maintenance of out buildings, parks, grounds, vehicles 
and other assets. Joe transformed Andover' s municipal maintenance functions into a world class 
operation by employing strong project management tools and practices, implementing energy 
conservation projects and applying process automation to reduce the cost of delivering 
maintenance services. Combined, Tony and Joe are irreplaceable leaders who have left Andover 
immeasurably better positioned to deliver services to our citizens both efficiently and 
economically. 

As an example of Andover' s financial strength and stability, in December, Andover 
refinanced $18M of long term bonds at a historically low interest rate of 1.877% for ten years. 
This low borrowing rate proves the level of confidence that the financial markets have in 
Andover' s ability to repay its liabilities. This refinanced debt resulted in the reduction of 
approximately $1.4M in interest payments over the next 10 years. By lowering these interest 
payments that are funded from property taxes, Andover is able to stretch your tax dollars to 
maximize their service delivery impact. 

Our Town labor unions have continued to work collectively with Town leadership to 
create contract agreements that are both affordable within today's economic situation and ensure 
the reduction of Andover 's long term liabilities. In 201 1, each of the Town labor unions agreed 
to a 1 year contract that has a zero percent salary adjustment. This action followed one year after 
each of those same unions agreed to return 1% of their previously agreed to salary adjustments to 
the Town coffers. Both of these actions were in support of the difficult economic climate that 
has negatively impacted both the private and public sectors over the last few years. This 
economic situation has impacted Andover' s operating budget with fewer state revenue dollars 
and escalating costs such as for health insurance and energy. Given the property tax limitations 
of 2-1/2% annual growth, our unions agreed that it was better to keep all employee salary levels 
stationary to prevent the need for deep cuts to our service delivery to Andover citizens. To our 
labor unions - Thank you! 

201 1 was also a year focused on developing plans and strategies to further strengthen our 
municipal facilities and infrastructure. The year began with a successful debt exclusion ballot 
that passed the funding for the new Bancroft Elementary School construction project. As 201 1 



proceeded, Andover benefited from the superb work of two dedicated citizen task forces that 
focused on creating strategies and potential plans to replace the Andover Municipal Services 
Facility and the Ballardvale Fire Station. These two projects urgently require resolution in the 
next couple of years due to their age and severe structural and functional deficiencies. Andover 
closed out 201 1 with a Special Town Meeting in December that saw over 2,000 registered voters 
participate in the discussion of whether to complement $2.2M of private funding with $2M of 
public resources to construct the Cormier Youth Center. The Special Town Meeting participants 
overwhelmingly supported the plan that will construct a single facility that will support multi- 
generational programs for our youth, seniors and other groups. 

Although not new in 2011, the concepts of consolidation and regionalization were met 
with new vigor as the Board of Selectmen, School Committee and Finance Committee sought to 
find more efficient and effective ways to deliver important services. Through the years, it has 
become common practice for Andover to participate in regional efforts for purchasing supplies, 
equipment and vehicles, sharing library resources and protecting the safety and well-being of our 
citizens. In 201 1, we joined forces with North Andover to share their sewer cleaning apparatus 
to enable Andover to trial this new technology and provide revenue to our neighbors to the north. 
Additionally, the Town and School leadership worked together to consolidate four IT 
departments into one and mined operational savings to hire a Chief Information Officer to 
oversee the new function. In support of this new function, Andover again benefitted from the 
expertise of our citizenry as a volunteer task force completed their multi-year effort that 
successfully constructed a community wide Technology Strategic Plan to improve Andover' s IT 
infrastructure and operations. 

The Summer of 2011 was filled with excitement and celebration as the Andover 
Nationals Little League All Star Team won the Little League State Championship. This team 
traveled across our Commonwealth and then to Bristol, Connecticut to compete in the New 
England Little League Championships. They lived and played by the slogan 15=1 recognizing 
the importance of each player in enabling the success of the team. These young boys were 
heroes to their peers and simultaneously positive role models to the older generations teaching 
many of us how to win with humility and how to lose with dignity. 

As we move into 2012, Andover will continue to benefit from the strong working 
relationships of the Town and School leadership and staff. Our community finds strength 
through the expertise of our employees and energy through the knowledge of our volunteer 
boards, committees and task forces. Collectively, there is no challenge that is too great for us to 
overcome. 

I respectfully submit this correspondence on behalf of the Andover Board of Selectmen 
for the 201 1 Annual Report. 




Brian P. Major 

Andover Board of Selectmen Chairman 




TOWN OF ANDOVER 



Town Offices 

36 Bartlet Street 

Andover, MA 01810 

978-623-8225 
www.andoverma.gov 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen and Citizens of the Town of Andover: 

For the year 201 1, the Town of Andover can best be characterized by the words "project 
planning" and "transitions". There were four large scale projects in the depths of the planning 
process during the year. Also, there were a number of significant personnel transitions in 201 1 . 

The four major projects in the planning phase were: the Bancroft Elementary School, 
Andover Youth Center, Municipal Services Facility/Town Yard and Ballardvale Fire Station. 

The Bancroft Elementary School wetlands permitting process was nearly complete when 
several abutters appealed the Conservation Commission's Order of Conditions to the Department 
of Environmental Protection (DEP). The DEP issued a Superseding Order of Conditions 
approving the project. The abutters also appealed the Conservation Commission's Order under 
the Town's Wetlands Bylaw to the Superior Court. The DEP and Superior Court found in favor 
of the Town. As the year ended, the Bancroft School Building Committee was on-hold pending 
any appeals by the abutters. 

The Andover Youth Foundation was very busy working on the preliminary design for the 
Youth Center to be located behind the Doherty Middle School. A Special Town Meeting was 
held in early December which approved the appropriation of $2.0M as the Town's share of this 
$4.2M center. At year's end, the Andover Youth Center Building Committee was formed as an 
advisory committee to oversee the design and construction of the Youth Center. 

The Town Yard Task Force issued an REP and selected the 5 Campanelli Drive site for 
the relocated Town Yard/Municipal Services Facility. Negotiations are underway with the 
owner and preliminary plans were drafted for a proposed 57,500 square foot facility on 
approximately 7.5 acres. 

The Ballardvale Fire Station Building Committee reviewed all available Town sites in the 
Ballardvale area and selected the South School site at the corner of Woburn Street and Andover 
Street. They also issued an RJFP and received one proposal for a private lot at 270 Andover 
Street. Their preliminary design and related studies showed that a fire substation at either 
location would address the public safety needs of Ballardvale and South Andover. 

The year 2011 was one of personnel transitions. On the Board of Selectmen, Paul J. 
Salafia was elected to replace John P. Hess who served the unexpired term of Jerry Stable, Jr. 
Anthony J. Torrisi retired as the Finance and Budget Director after 32 years of service. He was 
replaced by Donna M. Walsh. Joseph R. Piantedosi retired as the Director of the Plant & 



Facilities Department. Maria B. Maggio was appointed as the Acting Director of Plant & 
Facilities. Christopher M. Cronin was appointed as the Acting Director of the Department of 
Public Works. Paul J. Puzzanghera was selected as the Chief Information Officer to head the 
newly-created Information Technology Department. This new department is an integration of 
both the Town and School IT personnel with the mission of re-vamping and modernizing the 
entire IT infrastructure and organization for the Town of Andover. 

The Annual Town Meeting dealt with forty-seven warrant articles. The Budget was 
approved at $134,827,279 and thanks go to the Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee and 
School Committee for reaching a consensus on the FY-2012 spending/revenue plan on a timely 
basis. 

The Town Meeting members kept the Town green by approving two warrant articles - 
one to fund a feasibility study for renewable energy facilities on municipal land and the other for 
long-term renewable electricity contracts. Both articles will put the Town in a better position to 
take advantage of solar or other renewable energy initiatives that are available. 

The Virginia Cole Community Service Award was presented to Robert French, the 
founder and director of the successful Church Basketball Program for the youth of Andover. 
Bob has been involved in youth basketball for 43 years as a coach, an administrator and, most 
importantly, as a role model who taught the "fun" of the game while building skills. The Church 
Basketball Program has been re-named the Bob French Basketball Program in his honor. 

The report on 2011 can't end without mentioning two significant highlights. First, the 
Winter of 2010-2011 was one of the snowiest on record. Andover received 92.25 inches of 
snow, second only to 1996 when 130 inches blanketed our Town! Second, the December 
Special Town Meeting was attended by 2,200 registered voters. Although this isn't a record for 
attendance at an Annual Town Meeting, it certainly is one for a Special Town Meeting. A 
special thank you goes to Town Moderator Sheila Doherty for the calm leadership she exhibited 
as she conducted the official business of the meeting. 

Finally, I want to thank the Selectmen, Department Heads, Town staff and volunteers for 
all they do to conduct the business of the Town in a professional manner. Andover would not be 
the great community it is without their dedication to providing world-class public service. 

It is my pleasure to serve as your Town Manager. 

Very truly yours, 




Reginald S. Stapczyr 
Town Manager 



TOWN OF ANDOVER 

Mission & Values Statement 

Developed by the 

Board of Selectmen, Town Manager, and Town Department Heads 

Adopted by the Board of Selectmen on October 6, 2003 



The mission of the Town of Andover is to ensure the safety, education, and well-being of the 
community; to be a leader in the delivery of efficient and effective quality services that respond to 
community needs; to promote the continuous improvement of staff skills and performance; to 
encourage an environment of trust; to respect cultural and economic diversity; and to preserve the 
historic character of the community. 

The Board of Selectmen, as the chief policy makers for the Town of Andover, Massachusetts, 
will provide leadership in advancing the following primary and supporting values: 



Value 1 - Ensure the safety, education, 
and well-being of the community 

1 . 1 Protect the safety of persons and property 

1 .2 Maintain the high quality of education 
for all 

1 .3 Maintain the Town's infrastructure 

1 .4 Promote public health programs and 
awareness 

1 . 5 Manage the impact of non-municipal 
public utilities 

1 .6 Support human/community services 

1 .7 Ensure compliance with regulatory 
requirements 

1.8 Identify and promote economic 
opportunities 

Value 2 - Be a leader in the delivery of 
efficient and effective quality services 
that respond to community needs 

2.1 Deliver innovative municipal services 

2.2 Encourage cost saving initiatives 

2.3 Assess and prioritize community needs 

2.4 Maintain the Town's "Aaa" bond rating 

Value 3 - Promote the continuous 
improvement of staff skills and 
performance 

3 . 1 Recruit, develop, and retain a highly 
skilled workforce 



3.2 Promote and recognize municipal 
professionalism 

3.3 Measure, evaluate, and improve 
performance 

Value 4 - Encourage an environment of 
trust and honesty 

4. 1 Uphold high ethical standards 

4.2 Value teamwork and cooperation 

4.3 Promote open communication with the 
public 

4.4 Solicit citizen participation 

4.5 Recognize the outstanding contributions 
of citizens 

Value 5 - Respect cultural and 
economic diversity 

5.1 Promote diversity in the workforce and 
community 

5.2 Provide services that are accessible, fair, 
and equitable 

5.3 Support housing alternatives 

Value 6 - Preserve the historic 
character of the community 

6. 1 Celebrate Andover' s unique heritage 

6.2 Protect and acquire open space 



The Andover Vision 

As citizens of Andover, we are grateful to those in the past who nurtured the attractive, well managed, and 
vibrant town that we enjoy today. At the same time, we are mindful of our current stewardship and the fragile 
nature of much that we cherish. We have confidence that the most promising approach to the future is to 
acknowledge and act upon the values that we share. This is our Vision and our hopes and commitments for the 
Andover of the future. Vision 21 Committee - July 26, 2004 



QUALITY EDUCATION 

We will offer a rich and challenging public education that 
builds essential skills and knowledge that support a broad range 
of academic and vocational options, enable successful 
participation in our society and culture, and sustain curiosity 
and learning in a world of new and ever changing 
opportunities. We will cultivate the public library as a resource 
for lifelong learning and enrichment and as facilitator for the 
flow of information throughout the community. We will find 
ways to protect the quality of these institutions through 
fluctuating economic cycles. 



FINANCIAL STABILITY 

We will follow prudent financial practices that balance 
consistent high-quality services, private vs. public 
responsibility, stable tax rates, and responsible levels of debt. 
We will set ambitious goals but live within our means. In 
making financial decisions, we will include an understanding of 
long-term costs and consequences, particularly to the 
environmental integrity of the Town. We will consider 
regional partnerships that offer more effective and economical 
options, and we will manage the impact of our decisions on 
property values relative to similar communities. 



OPEN SPACE AND RECREATION 

We will continue to acquire and protect open space as a crucial 
natural resource that helps to maintain the character of the 
town, offers access to both active and passive recreation, and 
provides an important natural system for water recharge, flood 
control, and wildlife habitat. 



HEALTHY AND SAFE ENVIRONMENT 

We will protect public health and safety through careful 
monitoring and enforcement of environmental, health, and 
safety regulations and by continuing to provide effective and 
responsive fire and police protection and beneficial public 
health services. 



VIBRANT DOWNTOWN 

We will maintain our downtown as an attractive and vibrant 
center with a mix of commercial and public activities, historical 
elements, and parks. We will use permits, zoning guidelines, 
and planning approvals to attract and keep pedestrian-friendly 
street-level enterprises. 

SMALL-TOWN CHARACTER 

Even as the Town continues to grow, we will actively seek to 
identify and preserve those elements — town layout and scale, 
central focus, community-wide activities, respect for historical 
structures, and residential mix that give Andover its small-town 
character. 

CITIZEN PARTICIPATION 

We will govern ourselves in a manner that encourages 
participation by all, that consistently provides adequate 
information for making informed choices, and that acts to 
preserve our investment and the interests of the community as a 
whole. We will acknowledge the needs of others and consider 
compromises that are in the best interest of the Town and 
region. 

HISTORICAL HERITAGE 

We will maintain strong and consistent zoning that protects 
historic buildings and places, and we will support the 
institutions that protect and promote Andover 's historical 
heritage. 

CULTURAL DIVERSITY 

We will be respectful of Andover's many races, ethnicities, 
religious beliefs, and lifestyles. We will facilitate public 
events that celebrate diversity and provide opportunities for 
sharing cultural traditions. As a community, we will not 
tolerate acts of hatred or persecution. 



MANAGEMENT OF NATURAL RESOURCES 

We will manage and protect our natural resources, particularly 
water, in a manner that acknowledges our responsibility to 
future generations and to other communities that share those 
resources. We will monitor air quality and take measures to 
mitigate negative effects of emissions from vehicles, regional 
incinerators, and industrial facilities. 

TOWN SERVICES 

We will provide effective and efficient services that build and 
maintain Town infrastructure, handle Town business, and assist 
citizens. We will use technology to facilitate interdepartmental 
communication and efficiency, and to provide public access to 
Town information. 

HUMAN SERVICES 

Through our department of community services, other Town 
programs, and religious institutions, we will sponsor services 
and programs, facilities, outreach, and recognition to veterans, 
seniors, youth, and the disabled or disadvantaged among us. 
We will foster connections among all citizens to help us to 
appreciate, learn from, and support one another. 

TRANSPORTATION 

We will monitor changing commuting patterns and side-effects 
on air and water quality, noise, and traffic. We will work 
within the region to strengthen opportunities for regional 
transit, rail travel, commuter buses, and improved connections 
with mass transit hubs. We will seek solutions to local needs 
for downtown and commuter parking, for safe and efficient 
traffic flow, and for shuttle service to local facilities and 
services. We will encourage foot and bicycle travel as an 
alternative to automobiles, whenever feasible. 



TOWN OF ANDOVER 

Community Development Plan 



Background - In January 2000, the Governor issued 
Executive Order 418 providing cities and towns with 
$30,000 to create a Community Development Plan (CDP) 
to address the state's critical housing need while 
simultaneously balancing economic progress, 
transportation issues and open space preservation. The 
CDP's purpose is to encourage people to think about what 
is best for the whole community now and in the future. 
The Department of Housing and Community Development 
approved Andover's CDP in December 2004. As a result, 
Andover continues to be eligible for state funding and 
competitive grants. The Town will also use the Plan's 
conclusions to update the corresponding four sections in 
the 1992 Master Plan. 

Introduction - The Town of Andover is faced with 



several challenges: 1) Housing has become less affordable 
for those who want to live and work, or simply to remain, 
in Andover; 2) Andover must remain economically 
competitive to maintain a stable tax base; 3) Limited 
funding and the continuous development of substandard 
parcels impede the preservation of open space; and 4) 
Residential, commercial, and industrial development at the 
local and regional levels has dramatically increased traffic. 
The foundation of the CDP is the Andover Vision 
Statement. The Vision provides a framework for decision- 
making by Town officials and citizens. Where elements of 
this Plan differ from the Vision, implementation must 
involve balance and compromise, weighing the various 
inputs according to their proportionate value. 

Economic Development Element - Andover has a 
strong local economy that was created through properly 
designed land uses, strong planning, and good positioning. 
In order to be competitive in the changing economy, it is 
recommended that the Town proceed with the following 
economic strategies: 1) Create a new management and 
marketing organization or committee that focuses on local 
business interests while utilizing the marketing skills of 
regional organizations; 2) Consider adopting zoning bylaw 
amendments that encourage a diverse mix of high 
quality/low impact industries and allow the development 
and redevelopment of existing parcels; 3) Improve 
infrastructure and programs that create access to industrial 
land and reduce congestion on local roads; and 4) Seek 
partnerships with Andover's business community. 

Housing Element - Over time, the enhanced economy 
has provided a tax base that created first-rate town 
services, including a high-quality school system, and 
funding for open space preservation. The result is 
increased demand for the remaining land. Housing costs 
have outpaced the region and the nation over the past ten 
years. Due to Andover approaching its build out, greater 
care is needed in planning for future land development. 
Unless measures are taken to protect and increase 



Andover's housing supply, there is a danger that people 
who were raised here and who work here, will no longer 
be able to afford Andover. The solution is coordinated 
expansion of opportunities for different market segments, 
gradually reducing pressure and opening new options. 
Suggested recommendations: 1) Keep designated 
affordable housing units in perpetuity; 2) Provide outreach 
to seniors and encourage elderly housing developments; 3) 
Establish a housing trust fund; and 4) Encourage zoning 
bylaw regulations that reuse old, industrial buildings for 
residential uses, maintain a mix of housing stock, preserve 
neighborhoods and promote new development to be 
moderate in scale. 

Open Space Element - The value of land in Andover 
has become so high; almost every parcel now in private 
hands is vulnerable to housing or commercial development 
within the next few decades. The need to protect critical 
open space areas is necessary to protect Andover's small 
town character, provide recreational opportunities, and 
continue wise management of natural resources. Suggested 
recommendations: 1) Acquire undeveloped portions of 
watershed or protect it through regulations; 2) Encourage 
developers to design subdivisions that protect critical areas 
and provide open space parcels and connections to 
conservation land; 3) Establish alternative linkages and 
trails; 4) Develop a management plan for town-owned 
conservation properties, and budget annually for 
maintenance of conservation areas; 5) Encourage volunteer 
efforts to promote proper use and maintenance whenever 
possible; and 6) Seek funding mechanisms to assist in 
continued acquisition of prioritized undeveloped land. 

Transportation Element - Andover's transportation 
system supports businesses and residences and connects 
Andover to neighboring towns and the regional interstate 
system. Although Andover has an excellent road system, 
there are issues that need attention. Over time, commercial, 
industrial, and residential development has increased the 
number of vehicles and the frequency of use into 
unaccustomed neighborhoods. Suggested recommend- 
ations: 1) Support high-speed transit systems that will link 
Andover with other areas of the Commonwealth and New 
England; 2) Support improvement of the Merrimack 
Valley Regional Transportation Authority's flexible design 
service along with expansion of days and hours of service; 
3) Repair or replace the inadequate bridges; 4) Increase 
bicycle use by providing a range of options; 5) Improve 
access and management of the River Road and Dascomb 
Rd. areas to create more efficient traffic flow and allow 
existing industrial land to be effectively developed; 6) 
Promote zoning and land use regulations that are 
consistent with the region's transportation goals; and 7) 
Build new access from 1-93 to Burtt Road and Lowell 
Junction to allow existing industrial land to be developed 
and decrease vehicle trips on neighborhood roads. 



Results Summary 

2008 Andover Citizens Survey 



Community Life Summary 

Andover is rated as an excellent place to live and 
raise children, with 97% and 96% of respondents 
rating the town as excellent or good in these two 
categories respectively. Overall quality of life 
received a 90% excellent/good rating. The areas of 
weakness appear to be shopping and dining (40% 
rate this as fair), and place to retire (54% rate this 
as fair or poor). In addition, a quarter of 
respondents indicated they were unsure about 
quality of Andover as a place to retire. 

Andover receives high marks for safety and 
appearance, with 96% of respondents rating it as 
excellent or good in terms of feeling safe, and 90% 
rating its overall appearance as excellent or good. 
Public transportation and range of housing options 
received the lowest overall ratings. Violent crime is 
not perceived as a problem in Andover, with 76% 
of respondents strongly disagreeing and 19% 
somewhat disagreeing it's an issue of concern. On 
the other hand, property crime and vandalism 
(though not graffiti) are seen as more relevant 
problems in the community. Overall, most of the 
potential problems that respondents were asked 
about did not seem to be major issues of concern. 
The one exception to this generalization appears to 
be automobile speeding, where half of the 
respondents strongly or somewhat agreed that this 
is a problem issue. 

Andover's public schools are seen as one of the 
most attractive features of the community, with 
three quarters of the respondents rating it as 
essential or very important in their decision to 
move to and/or stay in Andover. Town services, 
location, and property values were also rated as 
extremely important in attracting respondents to 
Andover and keeping them here. 

There is a strong consensus that Andover's stock 
of single family housing is appropriate for the 
community, with 85% rating it as just about right. 
Opinion on the amount of multi-family and rental 
housing is more divided, with approximately 20% 
of residents feeling there is too much of these types 
of housing, and another 20% feeling there is not 



enough. Only 1% of residents feel there is too 
much open space/farmland, while a substantial 
number (40%) feel there is not enough of this type 
of property in Andover's current mix. 

Local Government Summary 

Andover is a town where levels of voting and 
community engagement are high. In terms of civic 
and community participation, voting rates are 
much higher than rates of attendance at Town 
Meeting. Almost 90% of respondents said they had 
voted at least once in the past twelve months, while 
only 40% claimed to have attended the Annual 
Town Meeting. In a separate question, 43% of 
respondents reported attending Town Meeting at 
least once in the past three years. In addition, large 
numbers of residents attend town events (76%), 
donate money to local groups (78%), and shop in 
the downtown district (95%) at least once a year. 

Most of the Town's services were ranked 
positively, with nearly all being rated at excellent 
or good by at least 70% of survey respondents. 
Superior services (with excellent/good scores in the 
90+ range) were: schools, police, fire, EMS, trash 
collection, recycling, library services, parks, and 
handicapped access. Services that received less 
positive ratings were: street repair/maintenance, 
sidewalk maintenance, public parking availability, 
and public transportation, which were ranked as 
fair or poor by 45-50% of citizens. 

Contact with town officials was rated very 
positive, with 85% of survey respondents ranking 
their experience as excellent or good across all 
criteria. 

The Andover Townsman and word of mouth are the 
primary sources of local news and information for 
residents, with over 80% of residents reporting 
they use these sources at least occasionally to keep 
up on local town news. Electronic media, including 
newspaper websites, the town website, other 
websites or blogs, local access television, and 
email networks, were less frequently used by 
respondents as a source of local news. 



TOWN OF ANDOVER DEPARTMENT/DIVISION HEAD DIRECTORY 



Chief Information Officer 

Community Development & Planning Department 
Director of Health 
Director of Planning 
Director of Conservation 
Inspector of Buildings 
Electrical Inspector 
Plumbing, Gas & Sewer Inspector 

Community Services Director 

Elder Services Director 

Emergency Management Director 

Finance and Budget Department 
Finance Director 
Chief Assessor 
Collector/Treasurer 
Purchasing Agent/Insurance Coordinator 

Fire Chief 

Human Resources Director 

Plant and Facilities Department 
Acting Director 

Superintendent of Building Maintenance 
Superintendent of Parks and Grounds 
Superintendent of Plumbing, Heating and Electrical 

Police Chief 

Operations Commander 

Public Works Department 
Acting Director 
Highway Superintendent 
Superintendent of Water & Sewer Distribution 
Town Engineer 

Memorial Hall Library Director 

Superintendent of Schools 

Town Accountant 

Assistant Town Accountant 

Town Clerk 

Assistant Town Clerk 

Town Counsel 

Town Manager 

Assistant Town Manager 

Veterans Services Agent 

Youth Services Director 



Paul J. Puzzanghera 

Thomas G. Carbone 

Paul T. Materazzo 

Robert J. Douglas 

Kaija M. Gilmore 

Paul J. Kennedy 

Darren J. Dibartolomeo 

Mary L. Montbleau 

Katherine D. Urquhart 

Police Chief Brian J. Pattullo 

Donna M. Walsh 

David A. Billard 

David J. Reilly 

Elaine M. Shola 

Michael B. Mansfield 

Candace A. Hall 

Maria B. Maggio 

Edward S. Ataide 

Randy H. Pickersgill 

Ralph D. Knight 

Brian J. Pattullo 
Lt. James D. Hashem 

Christopher M. Cronin 

Christopher M. Cronin 

Morris B. Gray 

Brian W. Moore 

Beth Mazin 

Dr. Marinel D. McGrath 

Rodney P. Smith 
Theodora K. Moccia 

Lawrence J. Murphy 
Kathleen F. McKenna 

Thomas J. Urbelis 

Reginald S. Stapczynski 
Steven S. Bucuzzo 

Michael Burke 

William D. Fahey 




DIRECTORY OF TOWN OFFICIALS 
AS OF DECEMBER 31, 2011 



ELECTED 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Brian P. Major, Ch. 
Mary K. Lyman 
Alex J. Vispoli 
Ted E. Teichert 
Paul J.Salafia 



2012 
2014 
2013 
2012 
2013 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Ann W. Gilbert, Ch. -2012 

Paula Colby-Clements - 20 1 3 

Richard J. Collins -2013 

David A. Birnbach -2012 

Dennis F. Forgue -2014 



ANDOVER HOUSING AUTHORITY 



James A. Cuticchia, Ch. 
Francis A. O'Connor 
Janice Burkholder 
Daniel T. Grams 
Calvin A. Deyermond* 



-2014 
-2015 
-2013 
-2016 
-2016 

* Appointed by Cabinet Secretary of Executive 
Office of Communities and Development 



GREATER LAWRENCE TECHNICAL 
SCHOOL DISTRICT COMMITTEE 

Leo J. Lamontagne, Ch., Lawrence - 2014 
Marilyn M. Fitzgerald, Andover - 2012 
Kenneth A. Henrick, Methuen - 2014 
Abel Vargas, Lawrence - 2014 

Denise L. Perrault, Lawrence - 2014 
Thomas Grondine, Methuen - 2014 

Frank A. Rossi, North Andover - 2014 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 



Earl G. Efinger, Ch. 
John H. Atchison, Jr. 
Deborah K. Moskal 
Donna C. Ellsworth 
Dr. Eric Stubenhaus 
Rev. John Zehring 
Rev. Jeffrey S. Gill 
Rev. Tom McMillan 



2012 
2012 
2012 
2012 
2012 



TOWN MODERATOR 

Sheila M. Doherty 



-2012 



CORNELL FUND TRUSTEES 

Richard J. Bowen - 20 1 4 

Calvin G. Perry -2013 

Elefterios (Ted) J. Georgian - 20 1 2 



10 



APPOINTED 



TOWN MANAGER - REGINALD S. STAPCZYNSKI 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 




AUDIT COMMITTEE 




Dennis M. Adams 


-2012 


Paul C. Dow, Ch. 


-2013 


David A. Billard 


-2013 


Robert E. Finneran 


-2012 


Lewis C. Trumbore 


-2012 


Steven G. Caron 


-2014 






Steven S. Sintros 


-2012 






Kathleen O. Sherman 


-2014 


BALLARD VALE FIRE STATION BLG. COMM. 


BALLARD VALE HISTORIC DISTRICT COMM. 


Daniel S. Casper, Ch. 


-2014 


James L. Sheldon, Ch. 


-2013 


James T. Curtis 


-2014 


Diane R. Derby 


-2014 


George Thomson 


-2014 


Ronald J. Abraham 


-2012 


Michael Igo 


-2014 


Madelyn I. Mitton 


-2012 


John J. Kiely 


-2014 


Leo M. Greene 


-2012 


Dena L. Carbone 


-2014 


Jessica L. Roberts 


-2014 


Rebecca A. Backman 


-2014 


David J. Hart 


-2013 






Joanna L. Reck* 


-2014 


CABLE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 




*Alternate Member 




Zeff Marusich 


-2012 






John B. Flynn 


-2013 


COMMISSION ON DISABILITY 








Madelaine St. Amand, Acting Ch. 


-2012 


CONSERVATION COMMISSION 




Justin J. Coppola, Jr. 


-2013 


Donald D. Cooper, Ch. 


-2014 


Stephen W. Surette 


-2014 


Jon M. Honea 


-2013 


Patricia A. Commane 


-2014 


Kevin J. Porter 


-2013 


Bernadette L. Lionetta 


-2013 


Alexander Driscoll 


-2012 


Jami G. Cope 


-2013 


Floyd S. Greenwood 


-2014 


Julie E. Pike 


-2013 


Michael Walsh 


-2012 


Ruth A. Rosensweig 


-2014 


Frances M. Fink 


-2012 






CONTRIBUTORY RETIREMENT BOARD 


CULTURAL COUNCIL 




James A. Cuticchia, Ch. 


-2014 


Denise J. Johnson, Ch. 


-2012 


Robert J. 0' Sullivan, Esq.* 


-2014 


Donald W. Robb 


-2012 


Elena M. Kothman 


-2013 


Linda A. Kirk 


-2013 


Anthony K. Stankiewicz, Esq. 


-2014 


Judith T. Farzan 


-2014 


Rodney P. Smith, Ex-Offlcio 




Leslie Seaton Malis 


-2013 


* Town Manager's appointment 




Kathy S. Abisso 


-2014 






Kathleen M. Dolan 


-2013 


COUNCIL ON AGING 








Donald W. Robb, Ch. 


-2013 


DESIGN REVIEW BOARD 




Stuart C. McNeil 


-2013 


Craig D. Gibson, Ch. 


-2014 


Kathleen M. Devanna 


-2014 


Ann E. Constantine 


-2013 


Ann M. 0' Sullivan 


-2012 


Suzanne L. Korschum 


-2014 


Ann M. Grecoe 


-2013 


Anita M. Renton 


-2013 


Michael E. Basile, Jr. 


-2014 


Eric I. Daum 


-2012 


Margaret V. O'Connor 


-2013 






Joan M. Fox 


-2013 


DIR. OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 


Edward M. Medeiros 


-2013 


Police Chief Brian J. Pattullo 




Tracey M. Meech 


-2013 







11 



ELDERLY TAX AID COMMITTEE 

David J. Reilly, Ch. - 2014 

Michael Burke -2014 

Klaus B. Lasch - 2014 

FRANCISCAN HOUSING OVERLAY 
DISTRICT TASK FORCE 

Jo- Ann Deso - 2014 

Madelaine St. Amand -2014 

Mary Garrity Cormier -2014 

Charles R. Kendrick, Jr. - 2014 

James R. Lightburn, Jr. - 2014 

Peter J. Morris - 2014 

Arthur Friedman -2014 

GREEN ADVISORY BOARD 

Gregory M. Sebasky, Ch. - 20 1 2 

Patricia C. Russell -2012 

Iric L. Rex - 2012 

Melanie A. Cutler -2014 

Girish S. Rao - 2013 

Brian O. Salazar -2013 

AnilV.Navkal -2014 

Jonathan C. Unger -2012 

Thomas M. Parrill -2014 



FINANCE COMMITTEE * 
S. Jon Stumpf, Ch. 
Joanne F. Marden 
Gregory J. Rigby 
Cynthia J. Milne 
Paul Fortier 
Margaret N. Kruse 
Mark Merritt 
Mary O'Donoghue 
Daniel H. Kowalski 



-2013 
-2012 
-2012 
-2014 
-2014 
-2012 
-2013 
-2013 
-2014 



* Appointments made by the Town Moderator 



BOARD OF HEALTH 

Candace Martin, Ch. 
Katherine Y. Kellman 
Dr. Donald Miller 



2013 
2014 
2012 



HOUSING PARTNERSHIP COMMITTEE 



Lelani B. Loder, Ch. 
Francis A. O'Connor 
Vinod K. Bhandari 
Gail L. Ralston 
Jonathan D. Fuller 
Ann T. Cobleigh 
Edward J. Smith 
Kevin M. Cuff 



2014 
2014 
2013 
2012 
2014 
2013 
2012 
2014 



HOUSING TRUST FUND TRUSTEES 



Joan Duff, Ch. 


-2013 


Linda A. O'Connell 


-2013 


Carolyn Hall Finlay 


-2013 


Janice Burkholder 


-2013 


Charles W. Wolf 


-2012 


Reginald S. Stapczynski 


-2012 


MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY TRUSTEES 


Karen M. Herman, Ch. 


-2014 


Carolyn A. Fantini 


-2013 


Laurence J. Lamagna 


-2012 


Matthew L. Russell 


-2013 


John P. Hess 


-2012 


Stefani M. Traina 


-2014 


Anthony J. Straceski 


-2012 


PLANNING BOARD 




Joan H. Duff, Ch. 


-2014 


John J. McDonnell 


-2013 


Vincent A. Chiozzi, Jr. 


-2013 


Linn N. Anderson 


-2014 


James D. Doherty, Jr. 


-2012 


Eric W. Macaux - Assoc. Member 


-2014 



LOWELL JCT. INTERCHANGE TASK FORCE 

Christian C. Huntress, Ch. - 20 1 4 

Kerry P. O'Kelly -2014 

Beth A. Neimi -2014 

PATRIOTIC HOLIDAY COMMITTEE 

Calvin A. Deyermond, Ch. - 2012 
Veterans Services Agent Michael Burke - 2012 

Fire Chief Michael B. Mansfield - 2012 

John J. Lewis - 2012 

Robert S. Hamilton - 2012 

James F. Bedford - 2012 

Susan W. Ratyna - 2012 

Stephen H. Wallingford - 2012 

R. Scott Parrish -2012 

Calvin G. Perry - 2012 

Kevin P. Bibeau - 2012 

Barbara H. Hillman - 2012 

INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 

Richard B. Lindsay, DVM - 2012 

VETERANS SERVICES AGENT 

Michal Burke -2012 



12 



PRESERVATION COMMISSION 



RECYCLING COMMITTEE 



Karen M. Herman, Ch. 


-2012 


Arnold W. Dyer, Jr. 


-2013 


James S. Batchelder 


-2012 


Leslie A. Frost 


-2014 


Leo M. Greene 


-2013 


Joanna L. Reck 


-2014 


Craig D. Gibson 


-2013 


BOARD OF REGISTRARS 




Ronald C. Hajj 


-2012 


Gerald F. Gustus 


-2014 


William T. Downs 


-2013 


SCHOOL BUILDING COMMITTEE 




Thomas R. Deso, Ch. 


-2014 


Francine Goldstein 


-2014 


Dr. Marinel McGrath 


-2014 


Joseph J. Reilly 


-2014 


Annie W. Gilbert 


-2014 


Maria B. Maggio 


-2014 


TOWLE FUND TRUSTEES 




Christopher S. Doherty, Ch. 


-2013 


Jane Morrissey 


-2012 


Randall L. Hanson 


-2012 


TRIAD COUNCIL 




Richard Tyler, Ch. 


-2012 


Ethel A. Olsen 


-2012 


John L. Howard, Jr. 


-2012 


Nancy A. Bailey 


-2012 


Dorothy L. Bresnahan 


-2012 


Deborah A. LaPointe 


-2012 


Mary Joyce Kernan 


-2012 


Russell D. Ouellette 


-2012 


ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 




Stephen D. Anderson, Ch. 


-2014 


Nancy K. Jeton 


-2012 


Carol C. McDonough 


-2013 


Lynne S. Batchelder 


-2013 


David W. Brown 


-2014 


Rachel Baime - Associate Member 


-2013 


Shelley Ranalli - Associate Member 


-2012 


Christopher J. Matey - Assoc. Member 


-2014 


Phillip L. Boness - Associate Member 


-2012 


MERR. VALLEY PLANNING COMMISSION 



Michael W. Elmer 


-2013 


Alanna M. McKee 


-2013 


Donald H. Gottfried 


-2013 


Eleanor A. Storch 


-2013 


Keith M. Saxon 


-2012 


William J. Stearns, III 


-2014 


SCHOLARSHIP COMMITTEE 




David J. Reilly 


-2012 


Janis J. Hill 


-2012 


Rosalie F. Konjoian 


-2012 


Dr. Eric Stubenhaus 


-2012 


Joan H. Duff 


-2012 


Elizabeth M. Roos* 


-2012 



* Superintendent of Schools Appointee 

SPRING GROV E CEMETERY TRUSTEES 

-2014 
-2014 
-2012 
-2013 
-2013 



John S. Bigelow, Ch. 
Charles Heseltine 
Arthur H. Richter 
Sandra L. Dearborn 
Jennifer B. Smith 

TOWN YARD TASK FORCE 

Richard S. Feldman, Ch. 
David J. Wahr 
William T. Bride, Jr. 
Stephen E. Cotton 
Norman J. Viehmann 
David O. Nelson 
Paul T. Materazzo 

FOREST WARDEN 

Fire Chief Michael B. Mansfield 



-2012 
-2012 
-2012 
-2012 
-2012 
-2012 
-2012 



2012 



GR. LAWR. COMM. ACTION COUNCIL 

Edward J. Starr, Esq. - 20 1 4 

GR. LAWR. SANITARY DISTRICT REP. 



Morris B. Gray, Jr. 

KEEPER OF THE LOCKUP 

Police Chief J. Pattullo 

MBTA ADVISORY BOARD 

Katherine K. O'Neil 



2012 



2012 



2013 



Joan H. Duff 

John J. McDonnell, Alternate Member 



-2012 
-2012 



MERR. VALLEY REG. TRANSIT AUTHORITY 

Planning Director Paul T. Materazzo - 2012 
Senior Planner Lisa Schwarz - 20 1 2 



13 



HOW TO REACH YOUR FEDERAL & STATE ELECTED OFFICIALS 

United States Senators: 

The Honorable Scott P. Brown (R) 

2400 John F. Kennedy Federal Building, 15 New Sudbury Street, Boston, MA 02203 

617-565-3170 

317 Russell Senate Office Building, Washington, DC 20510 

202-224-4543 

www.scottbrown.senate.gov 



One Bowdoin Square, 10 th Floor, Boston, MA 021 14 



The Honorable John F. Kerry (D) 

One Bowdoin ! 

617-565-8519 

218 Russell Senate Office Building - 2 nd Floor, Washington, DC 20510 



202-224-2742 

www. Kerry . senate . gov/contact/emai 1 .cfm 

United States Representative: 

The Honorable Niki S. Tsongas (D) 

Fifth Congressional District 

1 1 Kearney Square, Lowell, MA 01 852 

978-459-0101 

1607 Longworth HOB, Washington, DC 20515 

202-225-3411 

askniki@mail.house.gov 

State Senator: 



Barry R. Finegold (D) 

Second Essex & Middlesex District 

State House, Room 424, Boston, MA 02 1 33 

617-722-1612 

Ban-y-finegold(@,rn asenate.gov 

State Representatives: 

Paul Adams (R) 

Second Essex & Middlesex District (Andover Precincts 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 & 9) 

State House, Room 39, Boston, MA 02133 

617-722-2014 

Paul.adams(o)mahouse.gov 

James J. Lyons, Jr. (R) 

Eighteenth Essex District (Andover Precincts 1, 7 & 8) 

State House, Room 39, Boston, MA 02133 

617-722-2014 

James. lyons(g),m ahouse.gov 

14 



HOW TO REACH THE BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



Board of Selectmen: 



Brian P. Major, Chairman 
1 1 Odyssey Way 
978-470-3428 
bmaior@andoverma.gov 



Mary K. Lyman, Vice Chairman 
50 School Street 
978-470-2685 
mlyman@andovemia.gov . 

Ted E. Teichert 
5 Dufton Road 
978-475-1087 
tteichert@andoverma. gov 



Paul J. Salafia 

283 South Main Street 

978-475-3462 

ihess@andoverma.gov 



Alex J. Vispoli 
7 Alison Way 
978-475-7661 
avispoli@andoverma.gov 



15 



HOW CAN WE HELP YOU? 

Mailing Address: Town Offices, 3 6 Bartlet Street, Andover, MA 01810 

Business Hours at the Town Offices: 8:30 A.M.-4:30 P.M. Monday-Friday 

(Comm. Dev. & Planning-8:00 A.M.-3:00 P.M.) 
Telephone Numbers: 

POLICE/FIRE-RESCUE-EMERGENCY 91 1 

Fire-Rescue- Business 978-623-8466 

Police Department-Business 978-475-041 1 

Town Manager 978-623-8225 

DCS Classes & Activities 978-623-8273/8274 

Department of Public Works 978-623-8350 
Department of Public Works-Highway Division 978-623-8426 

Human Resources Office 978-623-8530 

Memorial Hall Library 978-623-8400 

Senior Center 978-623-8321 

Superintendent of Schools 978-623-8501 

Andover's Home Page: http://www.andoverma.gov 

Memorial Hall Library's Home Page: http://www.mhl.org 

Andover's Population: 31,711 

Square Miles: 32 

Number of Acres: 19,900 

275 parcels totaling 1,970.24 acres controlled by the Conservation Commission- 

1 3 parcels have Conservation easements and 46 parcels have Conservation Restrictions 

1,100 acres owned by A.V.I.S. 

889 acres owned by Commonwealth-Harold Parker State Forest 

Town Meeting and Election: Town Election is held the fourth Tuesday of March. 

Annual Town Meeting is generally held four weeks 
following the Town Election. 

Voter Registration Information: Call Town Clerks Office at 978-623-8255 

Andover's Tax Rate: $14.1 5-Residential and Open Space 

$23.54-Commercial/Industrial & Personal Property 

When are Taxes Due: Taxes are due quarterly on the following dates: 

August 1 '-November 1 '-February l st -May 1 st 

16 



Excise Tax Information: Call the Assessor's Office at 978-623-8264 



Recycling Information: 
Questions: 
Curbside Pick-up: 



Call the Department of Public Works at 978-623-8350 ext. 515 

Every other week - place curbside by 7:00 A.M. on your pickup 
day. Single Stream recycling is now available. Recyclable 
material inclusive of glass (all colors, steel & tin cans, aluminum 
containers and #1 through #7 plastics. Recyclable paper products 
include: newspapers, magazines, junk mail, office paper, 
paperboard (cereal & cracker boxes - liners removed) and 
corrugated containers. Cardboard - please break down, flatten and 
fold boxes, cartons & other pieces of cardboard into 4'x4'x2' 
bundles - then tie or tape them together and place next to your bin. 



Complaints/Information: Call Integrated Paper Recyclers at 1-800-933-3128, the 
Department of Public Works at 978-623-8350 ext. 515 or e-mail at 

dpw-business@andoverma.gov . 



Compost Site: 



Bald Hill Compost Site - High Plain Road. Permit is required for 
the disposal of leaves, grass clippings and green garden waste or to 
pick up compost. Clippings must be removed from container used 
to transport for dumping. Fines will be assessed for illegal 
dumping. Please visit www. ando verma. go v/compost for the days 
and times site is open, how to obtain a permit, the fees and the 
permit requirements for use of the site or call the Plant & Facilities 
Department at 978-623-8280. 



Trash Collection Information: 



Curbside Pickup : 



Every week - place curbside by 7:00 A.M. on your pickup day. 
Household rubbish is limited to 4 bags or barrels or the equivalent 
of 135 gallons maximum per residence. One bulky item is allowed 
per week in addition to household trash. 



Complaints or Inquiries: 



How to Dispose of an Appliance: 



Call Allied Waste Republic Services at 1-800-442-9006, 
the Department of Public Works at 978-623-8350 ext. 515 
or e-mail at dpw-business@andoverma. gov . 

Appliances can no longer be left curbside - their disposal is 
the homeowner's responsibility. A list of private disposal 
options may be found in the "Recycling and Trash Guide 
for Residents" at www.ando verma. gov . 

Pothole or Snow Removal Complaint: Call the Highway Division at 978-623-8426 



17 



Pothole Claims: 



Must submit a letter to the Town Manager's Office within thirty days of 
the date of the incident attaching copies of invoices for expenses incurred 
or contact the office at 978-623-8225 with any questions. 



Where to Inquire About or Obtain Licenses & Permits: 



Ballfield Permits & Rentals 

Birth Certificate 

Building Permits 

(construction, plumbing, gas, electrical) 

Business Certificate 

Compost Site Permit 

Death Certificate 

Dog License 

Fields Rental 

Fishing & Hunting License 

Food Service License 



Liquor License (Annual or One-Day) 

Marriage License 

Open Air Burning Permit 

Passports 

Smoke Detector Permit 

Street Opening Permit 
The Park Rental 
Town House Rental 
Zoning Bylaw Variance 



Facilities Coordinator 
Town Clerk's Office 
Building Division 



978-623-8450 
978-623-8255 
978-623-8301 



(Office Hours: 8:00 A.M. - 10:00 A.M.) 



Building Division and 
Town Clerk's Office 

Plant & Facilities Dept. 

Town Clerk's Office 

Town Clerk's Office 

Facilities Coordinator 

Town Clerk's Office 

Health Division 

and/or 

Town Clerk's Office 

Town Clerk's Office 

Town Clerk's Office 

Fire Department 

Town Clerk's Office 
Fire Department 

Dept. of Public Works 

Town Manager's Office 

Facilities Coordinator 

Building Division 

and/or 

Board of Appeals Office 



978-623-8301 
978-623-8255 

978-623-8280 

978-623-8255 

978-623-8255 

978-623-8450 

978-623-8255 

978-623-8295 

978-623-8255 

978-623-8255 

978-623-8255 

978-623-8307 
or 623-8343 

978-623-8255 

978-623-8307 
or 623-8343 

978-623-8350 

978-623-8225 

978-623-8450 

978-623-8301 

978-623-8315 



18 



FORTY-SIXTH ANNUAL FOUNDERS' DAY - MAY 5, 2011 

FOUNDERS' DAY WAS ESTABLISHED BY THE BOARD OF SELECTMEN IN 1965 TO MARK 

THE DATE OF THE TOWN'S INCORPORATION- MAY 6, 1646- AND 

TO HONOR SCHOOL AND TOWN EMPLOYEES WITH TEN OR MORE YEARS 

OF DEDICATED SERVICE TO THE CITIZENS OF THE TOWN OF AN DOVER. 



TOWN DEPARTMENTS 



35 Years of Service: 



Kevin J. Hale, Highway Department 



Donald Swenson, Highway Department 



30 Years of Service: 



Morris B. Gray, Public Works 
Donna R. Morse, Elder Services 
Brian J. Pattullo, Police Department 



Dennis J. Lane, Police Department 
John N. Pathiakis, Police Department 



25 Years of Service: 



Marion E. Aziz, Elder Services 
Joseph P. Cahill, Fire Rescue 
Colleen A. Currier, Accounting 
Albert G. DelDotto, Fire Rescue 
James D. Hashem, Police Department 
Barbara D. Morache, Information Systems 
Clifford J. Pattullo, Fire Rescue 
Eric J. Teichert, Fire Rescue 



Cecelia K. Blais, Police Department 
Sandra A. Cassano, Town Manager's Office 
Laura J. DeGroot, GIS Coordinator 
Daniel N. Guillet, Fire Rescue 
James S. Misenti, Public Works 
James R. Moses, Police Department 
Dennis H. Sullivan, Fire Rescue 
Mark L. White, Plant & Facilities 



20 Years of Service: 



Alan D. Carifio, Public Works 



Rita Marconi, Human Resources 



15 Years of Service: 



Margaret B. Batcheller, Comm. Services 
Robin L. Cataldo, Police Department 
Timothy M. Hagerty, Police Department 
Brian Landry, Fire Rescue 
Paul T. Materazzo, Planning Division 
Kimberly A. Stamas, Community Services 
Glenn E. Wilson, Youth Services 



William T. Bruner, Dispatch 
Christine M. Collins, Library 
Michael J. Kirk, Information Systems 
Leo P. Lynch, Plant & Facilities 
Joseph R. Piantedosi, Plant & Facilities 
Scott G. Weightman, Fire Rescue 



10 Years of Service: 



Brian T. Blouin, Police Department 
Jeffrey P. Condon, Fire Rescue 
Jeffrey B. Gaunt, Fire Rescue 
Linda A. Lambert, Elder Services 
Shawna M. McCloskey, Elder Services 



Steven S. Bucuzzo, Town Manager's Office 
Salvatore J. DeNaro, Fire Rescue 
Lisa M. Schwarz, Planning Division 
John M. Maloney, Plant & Facilities 
Francisco Melendez, Elder Services 



19 



TOWN DEPARTMENTS 



10 Years of Service (Cont): 

Jane Morrissey, Health Division 
David A. Plummer, Highway Division 
Patrick F. Robb, Police Department 
John D. Teichert, Dispatch 



David P. Ouellette, Plant & Facilities 
Terrence A. Retelle, Fire Rescue 
Joseph E. Sgrosse, Plant & Facilities 
Jerome A. Welch, Public Works 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENTS 



40 Years of Service: 



Cynthia H. Abraham, Business Office Kerry A. Costello, Andover High 

Katherine V. Iworsley, High Plain Elementary 



35 Years of Service: 



Charles D. Croteau, Sanborn Elementary Diane M. Stefanelli, West Elementary 



30 Years of Service: 



Theresa E. Palardy, Doherty Middle 



25 Years of Service: 



Joyce N. Cullen, West Elementary 
Dolores E. Dunning, Andover High 
Dolores A. Laughlin, West Middle 
Nancy P. Walke, Doherty Middle 



20 Years of Service: 



Nancy D. Lundgren, Sanborn Elementary 
Mary E. Routhier, South Elementary 



Eileen M. Jones-Shaw, High Plain Elem. 



Leslee S. Demers, Food Services 
Patricia A. Hajj, South Elementary 
Thomas E. Meyers, Andover High 
Evelyn C. Wrobel, West Elementary 



Peter Otis, High Plain Elementary 
Patricia A. Spring, High Plain Elementary 



15 Years of Service: 



Roger L. Bachand, Technology 
Constance M. Barber, South Elementary 
Marjorie B. Britton, Shawsheen Elementary 
Susan A. Choquette, Andover High 
James G. Gioia, West Elementary 
Lynne J. Gorrie, Food Services 
Ann M. Kirwin, West Elementary 
Kim K. Lieberman, Wood Hill Middle 
Kenneth E. Matteucci, Doherty Middle 
Deborah A. Navarro, Bancroft Elementary 
Stephanie L. Ragucci, Andover High 
Stephen J. Sanborn, Andover High 
Raymond C. Tode, Technology 
Jonathan S. Wachs, Andover High 



Michelle L. Baer, West Middle 
Patricia I. Barrett, Sanborn Elementary 
Deidre R. Carty, High Plain Elementary 
Ellen P. Gaudiano, Andover High 
Cynthia R. Girard, High Plain Elementary 
Nancy E. Hood, West Elementary 
Siv Berg Kremer, High Plain Elementary 
Carol S. Martini, Andover High 
Jean A. Murphy, Sanborn Elementary 
Cynthia A. Pilla, Andover High 
Denise F. Russell, Doherty Middle 
Mary-Beth Smith, Shawsheen Elementary 
Timothy K. Van Wey, Andover High 



20 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENTS 



10 Years of Service: 



Matthew J. Bach, Andover High 
Lisa A. Besen, Bancroft Elementary 
Paula Brady, Andover High 
Magdalen M. Cantwell, Andover High 
Megan E. Clapp, Sanborn Elementary 
Suzanne J. Crowley, Sanborn Elementary 
Kelly L. Dougherty, Shawsheen Elementary 
Elizabeth J. Farnham, Doherty Middle 
Rosemary A. Gentile, West Elementary 
Martha A. Giguere, High Plain Elementary 
Scott L. Govoni, Wood High Middle 
Christopher G. Krueger, Doherty Middle 
Kathleen F. MacDonald, South Elementary 
Brian J. McNally, Andover High 
Marie L. Messina, Shawsheen Elementary 
Margaret S. O'Brien, Technology 
Beth M. Puleo, Shawsheen Elementary 
Ronald J. Robare, Substitute Services 
Darlene T. Samia, Andover High 
Marie C. Sharis, Food Services 
Laura A. Stella, Wood Hill Middle 
Marian S. Terranova, South Elementary 
Sydney L. Walsh, Shawsheen Elementary 
Joseph A. Wright, Andover High 



Mary J. Berger, South Elementary 
Eileen M. Biggio, High Plain Elementary 
Patricia S. Calley, Shawsheen Elementary 
Phillip Capodilupo, Doherty Middle 
Jennifer H. Collins, Andover High 
Joellen M. DeFeo, South Elementary 
Vera S. Dyment, Crossing Guard Services 
Victoria L. Feo, Bancroft Elementary 
Michael R. Giammusso, Substitute Services 
Kim A. Glesmann, South Elementary 
Deborah S. Hockman, Food Services 
Sherry R. Lundquist, West Middle 
Ruth G. Masters, Andover High 
Jennifer W. Meagher, Andover High 
Lisa Y. Miller, Wood Hill Middle 
Scott M. Price, West Elementary 
Laura A. Reagan, Sanborn Elementary 
Katie E. Rurak, Doherty Middle 
Patricia M. Scarborough, Substitute Services 
Betty A. Smith, Doherty Middle 
Donna M. Sunderland, Wood Hill Middle 
Janice M. Walsh, South Elementary 
Carol J. Weldin, Wood Hill Middle 



21 



FINANCE & BUDGET DEPARTMENT 

The mission of the Finance Department is to build and reinforce confidence in Town 
financial management by managing and planning all financial functions in an efficient, cost 
effective and responsive manner, and, through a collaboration of team efforts, provide departments 
and the public with the necessary information to assure accuracy, accountability and justification. 



FINANCE ADMINISTRATION 

The Town Manager's Recommended Fiscal Year 2012 Budget (July 1, 2011 - June 30, 
2012) was released on February 4, 2011. During the months of February, March and April 
meetings were held with the Board of Selectmen, Finance Committee, School Committee and 
Department Heads to review the Budget and warrant article requests and prepare recommendations 
for the Annual Town Meeting. 

In April, the Finance Committee Report was mailed to over 1 1,000 households. The Annual 
Town Meeting began on April 27, 201 1 and the Fiscal Year 2012 Operating Budget (Article 4) was 
adopted in the amount of $134,827,279. This budget represents an increase of $87,71 1 or less than 
1% over the Fiscal Year 2011 operating budget of $134,739,568. Capital Project Fund 
appropriations (Article 5) remained at $1,246,000. 

Some of the major accomplishments in 201 1 are as follows: 

Prepared the Town Manager's Recommended FY-2012 Budget. 

Prepared the Five- Year Capital Improvement Plan for FY-2012 - FY-2016. 

Provided staff support to the Finance Committee. 

Produced the Finance Committee Report for the 201 1 Annual Town Meeting. 

Maintained the Town's AAA bond rating from Standard and Poor's Municipal Credit 

Rating Service for the Town's bond issue. 

ASSESSORS 

The Board of Assessors is responsible for annually valuing all real estate and personal 
property accounts in the Town, as well as defending all appeals of these taxes. The three- 
member board is also responsible for the awarding nearly 200 property tax exemptions on an 
annual basis. Major exemption groups include senior citizens, disabled veterans, widows and 
widowers and individuals classified as blind. 

The Assessors also must conduct revaluations of all property on a triennial (every three 
years) basis. A revaluation was completed for Fiscal Year 2012. Interim adjustments were made 
in Fiscal Year 2011. The Board is responsible for meeting all Massachusetts Department of 
Revenue guidelines for property valuations, reporting of valuations and tax billing. 

The Assessor's Division gathers vast amount of property and ownership related 
information that is available to the general public. Exterior digital photos are now recorded on 



22 



all property and the valuations, sales information and other pertinent information is available on 
the Town's web site. More than 1,000 requests for public records and information are received 
and processed on an annual basis. 

The Assessor's Division completed the State mandated revaluation process for FY2012 
in a manner that allowed for timely tax billing. 

CENTRAL PURCHASING 

In 2011, the Purchasing Division processed approximately 1,072 Purchase Orders and 
2,665 Requests for Payment for the Town and 2,951 Purchase Orders and 344 Requests for 
Payment for the School Department. Approximately 48 bids and 12 Requests for Proposals were 
advertised and officially opened during this period. The continued utilization of the State bid 
contracts available to cities and towns provided numerous benefits to the taxpayers of Andover. 

Andover initiated and coordinated a number of Cooperative Bids as well as participated 
in a number of these bids with other communities. Under Massachusetts General Laws, two or 
more political subdivisions may jointly purchase goods or services through the bidding process. 
Some of the items purchased were: xerographic paper for copy machines, road salt, fuel oils, 
office supplies, equipment and furniture and School athletic and student voluntary insurance. 



Major Requests for Proposals and bids solicited in 201 1 were: 

■ MSBA Green Repair Program for the West Middle School roof and window 
replacement 
Custodial supplies 
Scholar supplies 

West Elementary School roof replacement 
Senior Center freezer installation 
Public Safety Center shooting range lead abatement 
Sanborn Elementary School boilers replacement 
Memorial Hall Library underground storage tank replacement 
Blanchard Street Athletic Fields 

Miscellaneous roadway construction and paving projects 
Sewer Construction - Lincoln Street and William Street 
Access Control System for Andover Police Department 

Installation of ceiling fans in High Plain Elementary and Wood Hill Middle Schools 
Two new model year 2012 Heavy-duty Dump Trucks - 43,240 GVWR w/body, front 
central hydraulics and plow frame 

Construction Management Services for a new Bancroft Elementary School 
Owner's Project Management Services for the new Bancroft Elementary School 
Professional Engineering Services for the new Bancroft Elementary School 
Professional Engineering Services for the reconstruction of High Plain Road at Fish 
Brook 

Acquisition of real estate for the replacement of the Ballardvale Fire Station 
Billing service for Emergency Ambulance Service for Andover Fire Rescue 



23 



Design and Construction Administration Service for Site Improvement of multiple 

schools 

Library furnishings and equipment for Memorial Hall Library 

Exterior sealant and miscellaneous repairs for Memorial Hall Library 

Cooperative bid for Highway Rock Salt, Solar Salt and Liquid Calcium Chloride 32% 

Cooperative bid for office supplies, equipment and furniture 

Andover Water Department Cross Connection Control Program 

One new 201 1 or current model year 4x4 Utility Tree Vehicle 

One new 2012 15-passenger bus 

Masonry repairs for the Town Offices 

Window repairs for the Town Offices 

The Purchasing Division is responsible for administering contract compliance of 
Andover' s Affirmative Action Plan as well as coordinating the Property and Casualty Insurance 
and Risk Management for all Town and School Departments. The Human Resources 
Department handles both the Town and School Department's Health and Personal Insurance. 

The Purchasing Division oversees the Massachusetts Interlocal Insurance Association 
(MIIA) Rewards Program. This program helps to control and reduce losses and provides future 
savings on the Town's insurance premiums. The Town was again recognized in 2011 for its 
High Achievement under their Loss Control Program. Participation in the MIIA Rewards 
Program earned a credit of $25,429 reducing the Town's insurance premium by that amount. 

The Purchasing Division also processed approximately 67 casualty and property claims 
over the year and was able to recover $21,244.05 for the Town. 

COLLECTOR/TREASURER 

The Collector/Treasurer Division is responsible for the collection, investment and 
disbursement of all Town monies. 

Highlights during 201 1 are as follows: 

■ Refinanced $12,740,000 of 2002 and 2003 Bonds at 1.877% for a net savings in interest 
charges of $ 1 ,370,000 on December 22 nd . 

■ Borrowed $2,000,000 for 1 year at .346% on December 22 nd for the Bancroft Elementary 
School project. 

■ Borrowed $6,241,000 for 20 years at 1.877 on December 22 nd for various Town and 
School projects. 

- Borrowed $1,125,000 for 1 year at .676%) on February 25 th . 

■ Borrowed $7,550,000 for 20 years at 3.478% on February 25 th . 

- Borrowed $488,000 for 9 months at 0.600% on June 22 nd . 

■ Added the Motor Vehicle Excise Tax to the Town's "On-Line" payment program. 

- Continued the implementation of the final 10% of the new automated water meter 
reading program including final billing on the old meters and all necessary reconciliation. 
Continued with outstanding customer service in all areas of real estate, excise and water. 



24 



Appropriations & Articles 

Other Local Expenditures 

Tax Title Purposes 

Final Court Judgments 

Overlay/ Other Deficits 

Other amounts 

Revenue Offsets/Cherry Sheet 

Total Other Local Expenditures 

State and County Charges 

Overlay Reserve for Abatements 
TOTAL EXPENDITURES 

REVENUES and OTHER FUNDING SOURCES 



BUDGET AND TAX RATE SUMMARY 



EXPENDITURES 



FINAL 
FY2010 

132,409,866 



4,000 

201,761 

38,884 



62.671 



307,316 

3,079,417 
822.806 



Revenue from State 
Cherry Sheet Estimated Receipts 
School Construction Assistance 
Total from State 

Revenue from Town 

General Local Revenue 

Revenue for Specific Purposes-Offset Receipts 

Water and Sewer Revenue 

Total Local Receipts 

Free Cash and Other Funding Sources 
Free Cash used for Warrant Articles 
Other Available Funds 
Total Free Cash and Other Funding Sources 

Free Cash used for Operating Budget 

Total Non-Property Tax Revenues and Other Funding Source: 

Total Property Taxes 
TOTAL REVENUES 



$136,619,405 



9,438,577 
1.551,447 



10,990,024 



8,879,764 

1,923,063 

12.774,627 



23,577,454 



334,000 
292,163 



626,163 



35,193,641 
101.425.764 



136,619,405 



FINAL 
FY2011 

136,128,816 



4,000 







61,280 



65,280 

2,926,555 
772,521 



$139,893,172 



8,819,405 

1.551.447 

10,370,852 



9,201,000 

1,811,500 

12,242,028 



23,254,528 



1,123,500 
485,992 



1,609,492 



35,234,872 
104.658.300 



139,893,172 



FINAL 
FY2012 

140,905,913 







32,363 



65.349 

97,712 



2,426,090 
980, 114 



$144,409,829 



8,713,708 
1.551.446 



10,265,154 



9,414,860 

1,872,775 

12.119.113 



23,406,748 



992,000 
871.771 



1,863,771 



35,535,673 
108.874.156 



144,409,829 



VALUATIONS & TAX RATES 

TOTAL VALUATION (IN THOUSANDS) 
RESIDENTIAL TAX RATE 
COMM, IND, PER PROP TAX RATE 
EQUALIZED TAX RATE 


FINAL 

FY2010 

$6,837,657 
13.19 
21.33 
14.83 


FINAL 

FY2011 

$6,616,552 
14.12 
22.46 
15.82 


FINAL 

FY2012 

$6,798,505 
14.15 
23.54 
16.01 


WHERE REVENUES COME FROM 

STATE AID 
LOCAL REVENUE 
OTHER FUNDS 
FREE CASH 
PROPERTY TAXES 


8.04% 

17.26% 

0.21% 

0.24% 

74.24% 


7.41% 

16.62% 

0.35% 

0.80% 

74.81% 


7.11% 

16.21% 

0.60% 

0.69% 

75.39% 


100.00% 


100.00% 


100.00% 



25 



Assessors Annual Report 2011 







ANNUAL PROPERTY VALUATIONS 






FY2009 


FY2009 


FY2010 


FY2010 


FY2011 


FY2011 


PROPERTY TYPE 


#ACCTS 


VALUE 


#ACCTS 


VALUE 


#ACCTS 


VALUE 


SINGLE FAMILY 


8,484 


$4,656,528,600 


8,492 


$4,498,853,200 


8,501 


$4,677,413,100 


CONDO 


1,570 


388,732,400 


1,585 


362,049,800 


1,594 


370,639,300 


MULTI FAMILY 


315 


229,151,600 


311 


219,756,300 


306 


216,981,600 


VACANT LAND 


556 


79,559,500 


548 


73,549,300 


560 


73,859,600 


OTHER RESIDENCE 


21 


14,039,200 


20 


13,180,700 


20 


12,840,400 


COMMERCIAL AND CHAPTER 


272 


541,868,527 


270 


528,547,655 


267 


524,106,899 


INDUSTRIAL 


139 


529,981,300 


139 


501,419,500 


139 


488,504,700 


MIXED USE 


171 


225,257,500 


171 


217,870,300 


168 


210,674,700 


PERSONAL PROPERTY 


622 


172,538,617 


642 


201,324,807 


696 


223,484,947 


TOTAL 


12,150 


6,837,657,244 


12,178 


6,616,551,562 


12,251 


6,798,505,246 



TOTAL 
Number of bills 


FISCAL YEAR EXCISE COMMITMENTS 

FY2009 FY2010 FY2011 
$4,561,372 $4,517,089 $4,620,042 

31,395 31,822 31,832 









TAX ABATEMENTS AND EXEMPTIONS 








FY2009 


FY2009 


FY2010 


FY2010 


FY2011 


FY2011 


ANNUAL EXEMPTIONS 


NUMBER 


AMOUNT 


NUMBER 


AMOUNT 


NUMBER 


AMOUNT 


WIDOWS 




6 


$1,925 


7 


$2,344 


8 


$1,925 


VETERANS 




118 


$101,826 


122 


$96,302 


122 


$93,481 


BLIND 




22 


$18,824 


18 


$15,869 


14 


$13,164 


SENIORS 




41 


$68,882 


38 


$65,265 


33 


$57,533 


DEFERRALS 




11 


$29,940 


11 


$35,567 


12 


$37,247 


HARDSHIPS 




I 


$796 


I 


$398 


1 


$552 




TOTALS 


199 


$222,193 


197 


$215,745 


190 


$203,902 






FY2009 


FY2009 


FY2010 


FY2010 


FY2011 


FY2011 


ANNUAL ABATEMENTS 


NUMBER 


TAX AMOUNT 


NUMBER 


TAX AMOUNT 


NUMBER 


TAX AMOUNT 


RESIDENTIAL 




72 


$50,486 


91 


$63,784 


38 


$45,609 


SENIOR VOUCHER 




192 


$129,600 


206 


$139,050 


225 


$151,875 


COMM/IND 




4 


$48,467 


21 


$603,537 


10 


$235,993 


PERSONAL PROPERTY 




2 


$7,200 


15 


$56,605 


3 


$491 




TOTALS 


270 


$235,753 


333 


$862,976 


276 


$433,969 



26 



FINANCE STATISTICS 



34,000 
33,500 
33,000 
32,500 
32,000 
31,500 
31,000 
30,500 
30,000 
29,500 
29,000 
28,500 
28,000 



MV EXCISE BILLS 



JTL 



O 
O 



°> rH 



fc t t It fc fc t 



<J\ O vH 

E fc £ 



$300,000 
$275,000 
$250,000 
$225,000 
$200,000 
$175,000 
$150,000 
$125,000 
$100,000 
$75,000 
$50,000 



TAX EXEMPTIONS - $ 






oo 



-xrr 



Ln 
in" 



ID 
H 
*A- 



OO 

1/1 






in 



o 

fM 



££££££££££ 



INVESTMENT INCOME 



$1,700,000 

$1,500,000 

$1,300,000 

$1,100,000 

$900,000 

$700,000 

$500,000 

$300,000 

$100,000 



iv 

■ST 



oo 



rsl 






rNro^-LnvoivoocriOTH 
oooooooo*-i>-i 



TAX EXEMPTIONS - # 




27 



TOWN CLERK 

The mission of the Town Clerk's Office is to uphold the integrity of the Town's 
democratic process, to maintain and preserve public records, and to act in the best interest of the 
community and the State by providing innovative, efficient, quality service. 



The Town Clerk's office coordinated two elections in 201 1 - a Special Town Election in 
January for a Proposition 2 l A debt exclusion to fund construction of the new Bancroft 
Elementary School and the Annual Town Election in March. The Town Clerk's Office also 
coordinated the Annual Town Meeting in April and a Special Town Meeting in December 201 1. 

The Town's vital records from 1985 have been scanned and are now issued through a 
scanning program that continues to provide great efficiencies in servicing the public. The staff 
works with the State Office of Vital Records and Statistics to implement the Vital Information 
Partnership (VIP) System, a State-wide data base of vital records. 

Volunteers continue to be a great resource in the office. They work hundreds of hours 
assisting with the Town Census, inventorying records in the permanent vault election duties and 
other duties where needed. Jerry LaBarre, Chris Hayward, Carol Hopkins. Polly Robichaud, 
Tony Sofia, and Charlotte Taylor are to be commended for the valuable sendees they provide to 
the Office and the Town. 



2011REDISTRICTTXG 

Even" ten years the Federal government conducts a national census. Andover's 
population according to the 2010 Federal Census is 33.201. The Federal Census numbers show 
that the Town grew by a total of 1,954 residents between 2000 and 2010. The figures were 
released in early 2011. The year following each Federal Census, Massachusetts towns are 
required to review their precincts based on the Federal Census population numbers. The idea is 
simple in concept. The population number from the Federal Census is divided by the total 
number of precincts which gives the so-called 'target population" for each precinct. No precinct 
can have more than 4,000 residents. Effective January 1, 2012, Andover's precinct lines changed 
— nine 9 precincts remain but with new and different boundaries. 

Once municipal reprecincting was completed the Legislature turned to the task of 
redrawing the State Senatorial and Representative Districts. Andover remains in the 2 nd Essex 
and Middlesex Senatorial District with a change in the Town's State Representative Districts. 
Prior to the change, Precincts 2, 3, 4. 5, 6, & 9 were in the 17 th Essex District while Precincts 1, 7 
& 8 were in the 18 th Essex District. The 17 th & 18 Essex Districts were dramatically changed 
under the new- redistricting plan. Precincts 2, 3 & 4 are now in the new r 1 7 th Essex District while 
Precincts 1, 5. 6, 7, 8, & 9 are now- in the new 18 th Essex District. 

Massachusetts lost a seat in the U.S. Congress based on the 2010 Federal Census. The 
Massachusetts Congressional delegation was reduced from ten seats to nine seats. The Special 



28 



Joint Committee on Redistricting, a joint committee of the Massachusetts Senate and House, was 
tasked with creating the new Congressional Districts. The Joint Committee chose to go with, as 
nearly as possible, zero deviation from the "target population" for each new Congressional 
District. Of the nine new Congressional Districts created six have populations of 727,514 while 
three have populations of 727,515. 

The Joint Committee's insistence on zero population deviation between Congressional 
Districts created unfortunate results for a number of Massachusetts communities including 
Andover. Before redistricting, Andover had been entirely in the old 5 th Congressional District. 
Andover now finds itself split between the newly created 3 r and 6 l Congressional Districts. 
The Town was not just split along precinct lines. Andover, like nine other Massachusetts 
communities, finds itself with splits within its precincts between Congressional Districts. 
Precincts 2, 3, 4, 5, & 6 are entirely within the new 3 r Congressional District. Precincts 1 & 8 
are entirely within the new 6 th Congressional District. Precinct 7 is split with roughly three- 
fourths of the population in the 3 rd Congressional District and the remainder in the 6 th 
Congressional District. Precinct 9 is also split with the majority of its residents in the 3 rd 
Congressional District and one neighborhood of 14 residents in the 6 th Congressional District. 
The Congressional Districts split required the creation of two new sub-precincts within the split 
precincts, Sub-precincts 7A & 9A. 

A map of the Town with the new Precincts, the 17 th and 18 th Representative District 
boundaries and 3 rd and 6 th Congressional District boundaries can be found on the Town web site 
at www.andoverma.gov . 



TOWN CENSUS 

In January, the Town Census was mailed to 1 1,284 households. The Town's population 
at the completion of the Census was 31,703. (Note: different criteria are used for the Federal 
Census than for the Town Census which accounts in part for the discrepancy in the population 
numbers). 



VOTER TURNOUT 

Election Date No. Voted % of Active Voters 

Special Town Election January 25 th 3,163 15% 

Annual Town Election March 22 nd 2,019 10% 

Annual Town Meeting April 27 th & 28 th 467* 2% 

Special Town Meeting December 5 th 2,037 10% 



First Night Attendance 



29 



RECORDINGS 2009 2010 2011 

Births Recorded 

Marriages Recorded 

Deaths Recorded 

Dog Licenses Sold 

Fishing and Hunting Licenses Sold 

Business Certificates 

New Voter Registrations 

Passport Applications 

*Due to a change in Federal Regulations, effective May 1, 201 1, the Town Clerk's Office is no 
longer eligible to act as a Passport Agency. The new regulations prohibit any agency which 
issues birth certificates from processing passports. 



257 


220 


227 


116 


122 


139 


274 


233 


283 


2,580 


2,469 


2,479 


248 


244 





95 


70 


97 


927 


1,296 


1,105 


613 


531 


204 



REVENUES 



2009 



2010 



2011 



Marriage Licenses 2,950.00 

Certified Copies 2 1 ,590.00 

Miscellaneous Licenses Income 13,355.00 

Liquor Licenses Income 97,450.00 

Business Certificate Filings 4,549.00 

Miscellaneous Income 1 ,03 1 .00 

Passport Fees 15,325.00 

Dog Licenses 39,979.00 

Non Criminal Violations 3,340.00 

Copy of Public Records 250.00 

Fishing and Hunting Licenses 6,592.15 * 

TOTAL $206,411.15 



3,125.00 3,600.00 

19,035.00 20,455.00 

12,925.00 14,080.00 

114,375.00 113,825.00 

4,272.00 5,226.50 

1,962.00 4,739.40 

13,275.00 5,100.00 

32,105.50 35,691.50 

2,900.00 3,900.00 

257.00 197.25 
6,645.74 ** No longer issued 

$210,877.24 $206,814.65 



** 



$6,271.50 in fees were sent to the State Division of Fisheries and Wildlife - $320.65 was 
retained by the Town. 

$6,325.25 in fees were sent to the State Division of Fisheries and Wildlife - $320.50 was 
retained by the Town. 



30 



TOWN CLERK STATISTICS 



$250,000 
$225,000 
$200,000 
$175,000 
$150,000 
$125,000 
$100,000 
$75,000 
$50,000 



FEE REVENUES 



fsn^LDiorvoocriOrH 

OOOOOOOOtHtH 



200 

190 

180 

170 

160 

150 

140 

130 

120 

110 

100 

90 

80 

70 



BUSINESS CERTIFICATES 



177 




151 



r>j n ^> 
o o o 



t t^ ^ tiL u t 



DOG LICENSES 




J 



NEW VOTER REGISTRATIONS 



3,500 
3,000 
2,500 
2,000 
1,500 
1,000 \ 
500 




-o- 



Ol rM 



CN 


ro 


■<J- 


ld 


io 


r^ 


00 


(Tl 


O 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


o 


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t t i S: fi: S: i i t i 



31 



TOWN COUNSEL 



During 2011, Town Counsel made numerous appearances before State Courts and 
Administrative Boards. Formal legal opinions were researched and rendered to Town officials. 
Court challenges to decisions by the Town's boards and commissions were defended by Town 
Counsel. 

Town Counsel successfully defended the Town and the Conservation Commission in two 
actions filed by abutters to the new Bancroft School construction project. 

Town Counsel successfully represented the Zoning Board of Appeals at the 
Massachusetts Appeals Court which upheld the Board's denial of a special permit regarding the 
division of property on Central Street. 

Town Counsel had conferences with the Town Manager and other Town officials on 
almost a daily basis. Town Counsel reviewed all warrant articles, drafted many of them, and 
attended all Town Meetings. Advice was given to Town officials and to Town Meeting on the 
legal basis for warrant articles. Town Counsel attended meetings of various Town Boards and 
Commissions which held hearings on various requests from applicants. During the period 
covered by this report, contracts were drawn and reviewed and numerous deeds, easements, 
releases and agreements were drafted and recorded. 

A particularly noteworthy document was the Grant Agreement with the Andover Youth 
Foundation for construction of a Youth Center. 

Advice was given regarding the State's conflict of interest law. Responses to public 
records requests were prepared. Documents were drafted to submit to the Massachusetts School 
Building Authority for the Bancroft Elementary School construction project. 

Special Labor Counsel advised the Town Manager and Board of Selectmen on the 
negotiation and drafting of bargaining agreements with employees. 



32 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 

The mission of the Andover Police Department is to protect our future and the quality of 
life in Andover. We are empowered to protect life and property. However; with the changing 
times of increasing social programs, our agency has become more service-oriented to the 
community. To continue our mission, we all maintain an open door policy to the community, 
working with their suggestions, needs and thoughts so that we may preserve the way of life that 
we all enjoy in Andover. 



MISSION STATEMENT 

The Andover Police Department is committed to providing the highest level of public 
safety and service to the citizens and business people within the community. The members of the 
Department are empowered to enforce the laws of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and the 
Bylaws of the Town of Andover, to ensure that the peace and tranquility of our neighborhoods 
are maintained and that crime and the fear of crime are reduced. The Department emphasizes 
integrity, honesty, impartiality and professionalism from its members creating an environment 
that values differences and fosters fairness and flexibility in our mission. The Department 
encourages citizen input and interaction that will assist in developing sound partnerships between 
the community and the Police. Working together will protect our future and enhance the quality 
of life for everyone within the Town. 

OPERATIONS DIVISION 

The Department handled 35,927 incidents in 2011 - a 4% increase from 2010. There 
were 416 arrests (13% decrease), 338 larcenies (32% increase) and 36 burglaries (51% decrease). 
The Department also responded to 63 calls of domestic abuse - a 40% decrease over last year. 

The Department issued 5,653 motor vehicle citations during the year which is a 9% 
increase from 2010. There were 949 motor vehicle accidents handled by the Department which 
is 3% increase. The reduction in vehicle citations is a direct relation to staffing at minimum 
manning levels on patrol shifts. 95% of the night patrol shifts are at the minimum allowable 
staffing level therefore reducing proactive selective traffic enforcement. The result is the 
inability to follow up on speed complaints from citizens on a timely basis. 

The Police Department continued to work closely with other Town departments, state and 
federal agencies and the community throughout the year. The Sub-Station, located on 
Grandview Terrace, remains closed for budgetary reasons, however, the Department continued 
its partnership with the residents at the Andover Housing Authority and the Youth Services 
Division through the New Horizons for Youth Program which is now funded within the 
Department budget. 

The Department continues to have great success with a School Resource Officer assigned 
to the Greater Lawrence Technical High School. Funding for this position is subsided by the 
Technical School. 



33 



The Department also participated in numerous events including the Holiday and 
Memorial Day Parades, the Fourth of July celebrations, Safety Saturday, Andover Days, the 
Feaster Five Road Race on Thanksgiving Day as well as numerous other road races held 
throughout the year. 

The Department is also involved in numerous regional initiatives and is an active member 
in the North Eastern Massachusetts Law Enforcement Council (NEMLEC) which is a 
consortium of 54 Police Agencies and 2 sheriff departments. We also participate in the Boston 
Area Police Radio Network (BAPERN) which allows for interoperable radio communications 
with other agencies as well as collective purchases for public safety equipment. 

SPECIAL SERVICES DIVISION 

RECORDS SECTION 

The Records Division provides support services to all divisions within the Police 
Department. This service enables information to flow efficiently throughout the Department as 
well as to the entire community. 

The Police Department received more than $98,667.00 in new grant money during 201 1. 
These grants allow the Department to serve the community by providing funding for personnel 
and other resources. Emergency equipment such as shelters, body armor, gas masks, 
defibrillators and other emergency communication equipment were also purchased with this 
grant money. Highway Safety grants allowed for extra patrols and selective enforcement around 
high accident locations. E-9-1-1 grants allowed the Department to train and certify all 
dispatchers in Emergency Medical Dispatching. 

The Court Section processed a total of 416 arrests and 502 summonses. This included 
tracking all Police Department cases from inception to disposition and coordinating officers' 
appearances in court. In addition, this section assists in tracking District Court cases for other 
Town Departments such as the Health Division, Building Division, etc. 

DETECTIVE DIVISION 

The Detective Division is responsible for the follow-up of investigations conducted by 
the agency. The Detective Division also oversees the Substance Abuse Unit. This unit was 
created in response to the community's request for the Police Department to take a more active 
role in combating drugs and alcohol in the Town. The Division also has one investigator 
assigned as a Juvenile Officer. The Juvenile Officer works closely with the schools and courts in 
processing Juvenile cases. 

The Detective Division continued to be actively involved in follow-up investigations 
throughout the year. The Division was instrumental in solving and identifying the perpetrators 
of numerous serious crimes as well as following the cases through the judicial system. 

The Detective Division followed up and investigated 36 burglaries and 338 larcenies. 



34 



The Division also investigates internet criminal activity. They recognize this new aspect 
of Internet crime as a major problem to our community and caution all parents and residents of 
the Town to be vigilant in combating this increasing problem. 

ANIMAL CONTROL 

The Animal Control Officer answered 1034 calls for service in 201 1. He responded to 
250 dog complaints and impounded 58 dogs and 2 cats. He also removed 244 deceased animals. 
In addition to these removed animals, there were 45 deer struck and killed by motor vehicles in 
Town. 

EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 

The Town's Emergency Management is directed by the Chief of Police and serves as the 
local link to the Federal and State Emergency Management Agencies (FEMA/MEMA), the 
Department of Homeland Security and the FBI's Joint Terrorism Task Force. It also includes a 
network of HAM radio operators that are on standby should the need arise for auxiliary radio 
services. A Citizen Emergency Response Team (CERT) has also been established and is 
providing residents with training and equipment that will allow them to be better prepared in 
times of crisis. 

The Chief of Police is the Town's Liaison with the Regional Local Emergency Planning 
Committee (LEPC) and is responsible for coordinating the Town's response to any hazardous 
materials incident. 

The Chief of Police is also the current Chairman of the Commonwealth's Northeast 
Homeland Security Regional Advisory Council (NERAC) which covers 85 communities in the 
region. 

The Auxiliary Police assisted the regular officers of the Police Department many times 
throughout the year. They are particularly active during the holidays and on Halloween. They 
are a very dedicated group of volunteers and the Town is fortunate to have their services as a 
resource. 

TRIAD - CRIME PREVENTION PARTNERSHIP/SENIOR CITIZEN LIAISON 

The Department has an officer assigned as a liaison to the Senior Center to assist the 
Town's senior population with quality of life and crime prevention issues and response to 
emergency situations. The liaison is also counsel to the TRIAD Council which is a partnership 
between the Essex County District Attorney, the Essex County Sherriff, the Andover Police 
Department and the senior citizens of the community. 



35 



POLICE STATISTICS 



70 
60 
50 
40 
30 
20 
10 



STOLEN VEHICLES & BICYCLES 




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340 

320 

300 

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260 

240 

220 

200 

180 

160 

140 -\ 

120 

100 



236 



216 214 



217 



185 



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36 



FIRE RESCUE 

The mission of Andover Fire Rescue is to serve the citizens of the community and its 
visitors by protecting them from the dangers created by man-made and natural emergencies. 



Andover Fire Rescue provides professional services such as fire suppression, EMS, 
technical rescue, and hazardous materials response. The organization aggressively attempts to 
minimize the risks associated with these incidents through effective fire prevention and 
investigation, code enforcement, public education and injury prevention programs. The 
Department is dedicated to assisting those in need regardless of the severity of the problem. 

VALUE STATEMENT 

The values of Andover Fire Rescue are service to those in need and community 
involvement through the professionalism, integrity, and dedication of its personnel. 

FIRE RESCUE and EMS OPERATIONS 

There are two basic sub-divisions within the Operations Division of Andover Fire Rescue 
- Fire Rescue and Emergency Medical Services. 

The Operations Division operates on four shifts led by a Deputy Fire Chief who is 
responsible for the oversight of all activities on a particular shift. Those responsibilities range 
from incident response and training, ensuring there is adequate personnel coverage and 
appropriately protecting the community on a given day. 

The Operations Division has primary responsibility for responding to emergency and 
urgent calls for help from the public. Services provided include combating all types of fires, 
providing emergency medical care to the sick and injured, containing and mitigating the effects 
of leaks and spills of hazardous materials, rescuing those who are physically trapped in such 
situations as motor vehicle accidents, industrial accidents or collapsed structures, rescuing 
persons caught in swift moving water, mitigating the hazards associated from downed power 
lines or natural gas leaks and providing aid in situations where those in the community need 
special assistance such as lock out/in situations, or animal rescues. 

In addition, all of the men and women of Andover Fire Rescue participate in presenting 
public fire safety and emergency preparedness educational programs, safety inspections, 
maintaining equipment, apparatus and facilities and continuous training. 

Andover Fire Rescue operates out of three fire stations with three EMT Engine 
Companies, one EMT Ladder Company and two Basic Life Support (BLS) ambulances 
providing 24/7 coverage. The fire stations are located on North Main Street, Greenwood Road 
and at the intersection of Clark Road and Andover Street. 



37 



Several specialized pieces of equipment (such as boats and a trench rescue trailer) are 
located throughout the community and staffed on an "as needed" basis by personnel normally 
assigned to the engine companies. 

Andover Fire Rescue has one reserve engine, one reserve ladder and two reserve 
ambulances among its fleet. The reason for the reserve apparatus is to ensure that the Town is 
appropriately protected when a "front line" truck is out of service for repairs or preventative 
maintenance, and to maintain the Insurance Services Office (ISO) Class 3 rating. 

The Department is comprised of sixty-eight personnel including four Deputy Chiefs, 
twelve Lieutenants and forty-eight firefighters. Suppression personnel work a 24-hour schedule 
with one of the four group's on-duty each day. 

One of the Deputy Chiefs serves as the Training Officer for Andover Fire Rescue and has 
the responsibility of coordinating and/or delivering all training-related programs in relation to the 
myriad of services provided by the Fire Rescue personnel. It ranges from the review of initial 
training that newly hired recruits receive while attending the Massachusetts Firefighting 
Academy, specialized rescue training recertification or continuing education and training to the 
entire organization. 

The delivery of Emergency Medical Services training is provided by Paramedic and EMT 
certified personnel from outside agencies or from within the organization. Extensive Federal and 
State regulations relative to the provision of emergency medical services and the appropriate 
documentation and administrative requirements, necessitate special focus and attention. 

FIRE RESCUE and EMS RESOURCES 

Andover Fire Rescue has three fire stations - each has one or more staffed companies as well 
as specialized and/or reserve equipment. 

Station 1 , Central Station -32 North Main Street (Downtown area) 

~ Staffed companies: Engine Company, Ladder Company, ambulance, Deputy 

Chief 
~ Specialized apparatus: 2 rescue boats, trench rescue trainer and air support 

vehicle 
~ Reserve apparatus: engine, ladder truck 2 ambulances 

Station 2, Ballardvale Station - Clark Road and Andover Street 
~ Staffed company: Engine Company 
~ Specialized apparatus: 1 Rescue boat 

Station 3, West Station - Greenwood Road (West Andover area) 

~ Staffed companies: Engine Company, ambulance 

~ Specialized apparatus: 2 rescue boats, fire alarm bucket truck 

Each of the four platoons consists of seventeen positions with a minimum daily 
staffing level of fifteen Firefighter/EMT's and Command staff. 



38 



■ Command Staff: One Deputy Chief 

■ Engine Companies: One Lieutenant, one driver/operator and one firefighter 
Ladder Company: One driver/operator 

■ Ambulance: Two Emergency Medical Technicians 

Andover Fire Rescue currently has Memorandums of Understanding (MOUs) with 
several communities to provide mutual aid, automatic mutual aid and other response needs in the 
event that the on-duty resources are overwhelmed by an incident. These agreements contain the 
provision of service by Andover Fire Rescue to other communities in return for service to the 
community of Andover. 

FIRE PREVENTION 

The following five primary objectives measure the success of the work done by the Fire 
Prevention Office: 

Reduce fire loss and injuries through the administration of risk-based community 
education programs. 

Manage risk associated with fire and environmental emergencies through successful 
implementation to engineering, inspection, code compliance and hazardous materials 
management. 

Ensure citizens can escape a fire safely, that suppression forces have the means to control 
a fire with minimal risk of injury and that damages to physical resources area minimized 
in an emergency through proactive prevention efforts in new and existing buildings. 
Investigate fire and hazardous materials incidents to understand causes and effects and 
apply lessons learned to improving our community's safety programs. 
■ Ensure that the Department is meeting the service demands of the community and 
providing excellent customer service. We strive to meet the interests of the Fire 
Prevention responsibility while attempting to meet the interests of the residents. 

The Fire Prevention Officer also supports the Incident Commander at all escalating fire 
and rescue incidents by fulfilling the staff function of Safety Officer. The Fire Prevention 
Officer responds directly to the scene to coordinate and address any safety and personnel 
accountability concerns that may arise during the mitigation of the incident. 

The Department annually inspects three or more family dwellings, schools, theaters and 
all public, municipal, commercial and industrial occupancies. All nursing homes, rest homes, 
hospitals infirmaries and inn holders are inspected on a quarterly basis. Fire drills are conducted 
at each public and private school quarterly and public sector training is conducted per their 
request. Facilities requiring assistance in developing evacuation plans are also afforded the 
guidance necessary in preparing the plans. All necessary State and Local permits for storage of 
flammables, installation of oil burners, fireworks and pyrotechnic displays, storage of gunpowder 
or blasting agents and the daily blasting or open burning permits are issued by Fire Rescue. 



39 



FIRE INVESTIGATION 

Andover Fire Rescue is responsible for conducting fire scene investigations to determine 
origin and cause. Fire Rescue has a Deputy Fire Chief who is specially trained in performing fire 
and arson investigations to determine whether the fire was accidental or arson in nature. Fire 
Investigators thoroughly examine fire scenes, interview victims, witnesses and potential 
suspects. The investigators are also responsible for collecting evidence and processing the 
evidence to determine the cause of the fire. 

Andover Fire Rescue has a Deputy Chief who teams up with members of the Andover 
Police Department, Massachusetts Fire Marshal's Office, Massachusetts State Police and the 
Essex County District Attorneys Office in the prosecution of arson cases. All entities involved 
are required to prepare detailed reports, present evidence and testify in Court for fire cause cases. 

FIRE PROTECTION 

Andover Fire Rescue provides services ranging from the education of elementary school 
children to the rescue of elderly citizens from nursing home fires. Installation and maintenance 
of all fire alarm wiring of all coded fire alarm boxes is also provided. 

SPECIALIZED RESCUES 

In addition to fire and emergency medical services, the Department performs numerous 
rescue missions. These include incidents involving stalled elevators, trench collapse rescue, 
confined spaces, high/low angle rope rescues, surface water and ice rescues. 

HAZARDOUS MATERIALS RESPONSE 

The Department, in cooperation with the District Hazardous Materials Team, mitigates 
all hazardous materials incidents. The District 6 Team is comprised of members from various 
departments from Billerica to Gloucester. Andover Fire Rescue maintains records of any and all 
buildings that store hazardous materials over the threshold amounts established by the 
Environmental Protection Agency. These records are required to be resubmitted to the 
Department on an annual basis prior to March 3 1 st . 

EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES 

Andover Fire Rescue provides first response to all medical emergencies due to accidents or 
medical ailments. The surrounding communities of North Andover, Tewksbury, North Reading, 
Reading, Billerica, Methuen and Salem, NH provide back up mutual aid ambulance service. In 
addition, the Lawrence General Hospital Paramedic Unit is requested when the emergency 
dictates the need for Advanced Life Support (ALS) based on stringent protocols established 
through collaboration between Andover Fire and Lawrence General Hospital. Andover' s 
ambulance service has recently upgraded its license from a Basic Life Support status to an 
Enhanced Life Support status as the result of placing Automatic External Defibrillators on all of 
its emergency vehicles. 



40 



FIRE STATISTICS 



FIRE CALLS 



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900 
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41 



PLANT & FACILITIES DEPARTMENT 

The mission of the Plant & Facilities Department is to provide a responsive, well planned 
and cost effective maintenance operation and capital improvement program for all Town and 
School buildings, parks and grounds, vehicle maintenance, cemetery, forestry and other areas 
within their responsibility. 



The Plant & Facilities Department provides scheduled and non-routine maintenance 
services to all Town and School buildings (over 1.35 million square feet), parks and grounds, 
cemetery, forestry and vehicle operations. Additionally, the Department is responsible for the 
following: 

Implementation of all major buildings and grounds capital projects including new building 

construction projects, landscape and field projects and driveway and parking areas. 

Town and School building and field rental functions. 

The Town's fuel depot. 

Spring Grove Cemetery operations. 

Compliance with environmental, health and safety regulations. 

Custodial services to all Town buildings. 

Town-owned traffic and streetlights. 

Building security. 

Bald Hill leaf composting facility. 

ADMINISTRATION 

The Department is managed by a Director who is supported by four Superintendents, an 
Executive Secretary, a Construction Project Manager, a Work Control Center Coordinator, two 
part-time Accounts Payable Clerks, a Business Manager, a Facilities Services Supervisor and a 
diverse group of skilled and semi-skilled Maintenance Tradespersons, Vehicle Mechanics, 
Custodians and Grounds and Tree Workers. 

ADMINISTRATION ACCOMPLISHMENTS/HIGHLIGHTS 

The New Bancroft School Design Development and Construction Documents Phases 

were completed. The CM at Risk firm was selected, the Final Design review and 

selection of the OPM are in process. 

Several additional roof replacement projects were completed which include Memorial 

Hall Library (slate roof), West Middle School, Wood Hill Middle/High Plain Elementary, 

West Fire Station, Rec Park, Pomps Pond and the Holmes Road building. All roof 

replacements for Town and School buildings are complete. 

More than 70 Summer and Fall projects were completed at multiple Town and School 

buildings and sites. 

Administration of the Bald Hill Compost Site Permit Program: 

~ F Y20 1 1 Revenue of $ 1 6,732 in Permit Sales 
. ~ FY20 1 1 Revenue of $7,0 1 5 from Sale of Mulch 

~ The above $23,747 in revenue is used together with operating costs of $20,000 

42 



(not including in-house labor) to pay for the operation of Bald Hill. 
Energy Conservation/Cost Avoidance: 

~ Continued implementation of our Energy Reduction Plan in order to reach a 20% 

energy reduction as part of our Green Communities designation. 
~ Investigated Net Metering Solar PV opportunities. A number of proposals have 
been received and evaluations are in progress by the Town and an outside 
consultant. We expect an agreement to be entered into in 2012. 
~ Obtained Town Meeting authorization for Town to enter into long term solar 

energy contracts 
~ Received professional assessment of solar PV feasibility at four (4) Town/School 
owned sites. We expect development RFPs to be issued in 2012. 
Tree City USA designation for the 12th consecutive year by the National Arbor Day 
Foundation. 

BUILDING MAINTENANCE AND MECHANICAL/ELECTRICAL DIVISIONS 

The Building Maintenance and Mechanical/Electrical Divisions are supervised by two 
Superintendents and provide all maintenance services including electrical, mechanical, 
plumbing, carpentry, painting and security to all Town and School buildings. The two 
Superintendents also function as Project Managers on a variety of Town/School capital 
improvement projects. Additionally, these divisions provide mail delivery to all buildings and 
maintain traffic signals and Town-owned street light poles. 

2009 2010 2011 

School Labor Hours 20,457 17,700 18,009 

School - Total Labor & Material Cost $1,129,900 $1,073,547 $1,175,389 

Town Labor Hours 7,309 6,193 7,270 

Town - Total Labor & Material Costs $687,817 $626,655 $609,113 

BUILDING MAINTENANCE AND MECHANICAI7ELECIRICAL ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

BANCROFT ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

Additional structural repairs completed 
Roof snow removal 

DOHERTY MIDDLE SCHOOL 

Converted room 1 14 to a regular classroom 

HIGH PLAIN ELEMENTARY/WOOD HILL MIDDLE SCHOOLS 
Completed the installation of a new PVC roof 
Roof snow removal 

■ Masonry re-pointing at Wood Hill Middle School . . 

ANDOVERHIGH SCHOOL/COLLINS CENTER 

■ Removed carpeting and installed new vinyl floor tiles in 2 offices 

■ Provided air conditioning to a special education classroom 

■ Provided air conditioning to the newly computerized Language Lab 

43 



Converted 1 classroom HVAC controls to direct digital with ventilation demand 

control. Installed demand controlled ventilation in Field House and Dunn Gym which 

will result in additional energy savings. 

Upgraded Metasys controls to web based system 

Facilitated a number of kitchen equipment additions and rearrangements 

Initiated new Loading Dock design 

Initiated new exterior Centralized Freezer design 

Initiated design to relocate the Copy Center to the High School 

Replaced bathroom partitions in 2 science wing men's rooms 

Cleaned and re-striped Field House rubber floor 

Installed perimeter security system in the Collins Center 

Replaced deteriorated concrete stairs at the Collins Center 

SANBORN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

Replaced the second of two boilers. 

Roof snow removal 

Built paved emergency access walkways to emergency egress doors 

Installed snow guards on roof 

SHAWSHEEN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

De-Leaded and re-painted 6 entryways and 12 doors 
Installed new roof drain at the Shawsheen modular building 

SOUTH ELEMENTARY 

Installed access control and CCTV system 
Installed new ADA compliant playground 
Roof snow removal 

WEST ELEMENTARY SCHOOL 

Reduced classroom HVAC noise levels for a hearing impaired student 
Replaced VCT tile in kindergarten corridor 
Installed snow guards on roof 
Roof snow removal 

WEST MIDDLE SCHOOL 

Removed lab benches in rooms 307 and 308 

Reoriented chairlift to accommodate student's particular needs 

Replaced sound systems in Cafeteria and Hart Room 

Facilitated the relocation of the computer room to the Media Center 

Renovated Room 401, including addition of classroom unit ventilator 

Renovated classrooms 404 and 405, restoring them to original music room service 

Installed additional electrical outlets in nineteen (19) classrooms 

Subdivided Room A-l for special needs student use 

Upgraded gas piping in kitchen to current code requirement and installed new equipment 

Roof replaced under the Green repair program (MSB A Grant) 

Gymnasium windows removed and replaced under the Green Repair program (MSBA Grant) 

Masonry re-pointing under the Green Repair program (MSBA Grant) 



44 



ALL SCHOOLS 

Selection of Pare Corporation to perform a Site Master Plan of all school sites except 
Bancroft and Shawsheen Schools. Items to be addressed include ADA compliance, 
lighting, drainage, site circulation, parking, muster areas, etc. This multi-year plan will 
result in a school site being reconstructed yearly. 
Fire alarm system testing and maintenance 
- AHERA (bi-annual asbestos) inspections 
Screened and recoated all gymnasium floors 

TOWN PROJECTS 

BALD HILL STICKER FEE PROGRAM 

$16,732 in revenue from permit sales in FY201 1 

BLANCHARD STREET 

Abatement and demolition of 3 Blanchard Street 

Bid for the design of the Blanchard Street Athletic Fields project 

COMPUTERIZED MAINTENANCE MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (CMM) 
New vehicle maintenance software system implemented. 

MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 

Installed new carpeting in all floors 

Designed reconfiguration and repair plan for handicap ramp and rear stairs 

Replaced underground oil storage tank 

Installed gas log in lobby fireplace 

Installed new gutters and snow guards 

Design for bidding for masonry repairs 

PEARSON STREET PROPERTIES 

Ongoing support to temporary Youth Center building 

PUBLIC SAFETY BUILDING 

Performed shooting range lead abatement 

SENIOR CENTER 

■ New walk-in freezer installed 

Design completed and bid for interior folding partition adjacent to aerobic floor area 

TOWN HOUSE 

Completed design work for window replacement 

TOWN OFFICES 

Lintel repairs and masonry re-pointing - Ongoing 
TOWN YARD 

■ Ongoing support to the Town Yard Task Force & Town Yard project 

YOUTH CENTER 

■ Support with initial plan, design and cost estimate 

45 



NEW ROOFING WORK - INSTALLATIONS COMPLETED 

Memorial Hall Library - Slate roof 

Wood Hill/High Plain 

West Middle School replacement under the Green Repair program (Grant) 

Rec Park 

Pomps Pond 

Holmes Road building 

West Fire Station 

PARKS & GROUNDS, CEMETERY and FORESTRY DIVISIONS 

The three Parks & Grounds Divisions (Parks & Grounds, Cemetery and Forestry) are 
independent and interdependent. They operate under the supervision of one Superintendent and 
share some equipment and work together on special projects. The three divisions perform many 
tasks seemingly unrelated to their principal horticultural maintenance duties, such as providing 
support to parades and other holiday events, litter control, trash removal, recycling, flagpole 
maintenance, fence/gate/backstop repairs, drainage projects, snow removal and repairing park 
benches and tables. 

PARKS & GROUNDS, FORESTRY AND CEMETERY STATISTICS 

Schools Town 

Man Hours 6,081 18,518 

Labor & Materials $199,074 $717,517 

Fields Revolving Fund Revenue FY2011 FY2012 

Actual Estimate 



$81,458 $80,500 



PARKS & GROUNDS DIVISION 



This division maintains over 2.75 million square feet of ball fields and 1 .4 million square 
feet of lawn areas located on all School and Town building sites and other Town properties 
including Ballardvale Playground, Upper and Lower Shawsheen, the Bowling Green, Town- 
owned parks, playgrounds and designated islands, triangles and other parcels throughout the 
Town. Ball fields are prepared (groomed and lined) for all secondary school athletic events. Turf 
maintenance consists of mowing, aerating, watering, over-seeding, liming, fertilizing and weed 
and insect control. This division also maintains small trees, shrubs and shrub beds on Town 
property and is responsible for snow removal at all Town buildings. 

CEMETERY DIVISION 

Spring Grove Cemetery on Abbot Street is owned and operated by the Town, contains 
approximately sixty acres and is approximately 75% developed. During 201 1, there were 43 full 
burials, 23 cremations and 45 gravesites sold for total revenue of $54,423. Cemetery operations 
and maintenance includes burials, mowing, trimming, turf care, pruning of shrubs and small 
trees, leaf pickup, Town- wide snow removal and other tasks, including grounds maintenance and 
special projects at other Town facilities. 



46 



FORESTRY DIVISION 

The Forestry Division is responsible for the maintenance of all Town-owned trees. Forestry 
Division work includes: pruning trees, clearing storm damage, flat clearing areas of undesirable 
vegetation and removing obstructions at intersections and curves for improved visibility. The 
Forestry Division also performs roadside mowing throughout the Town, maintains the Bald Hill 
compost site and plows snow for the Department of Public Works. 

201 1 was an extremely trying year for Andover residents and Town employees as they dealt 
together with the wrath of Hurricane Irene and the Halloween Northeaster. The damage caused 
by Hurricane Irene was widely covered by the news media but the Halloween storm caused even 
more damage locally. 

Following the Halloween Northeaster, the Forestry Division, with the help of the Parks & 
Grounds and Cemetery crews, worked with other Town Departments to address the 
unprecedented damage by assessing storm related tree hazards along 200 miles of roadways and 
School and Town facilities. 

These three divisions cleared downed trees and limbs to reopen roadways and responded to 
more than 300 resident requests for tree, limb and debris removal. Working with the DPW they 
helped facilitate the removal of residential storm debris by opening two sites in Town for 
residents to dispose of storm debris from their yards. 

The Plant & Facilities administrative staff supported these efforts, logging more than 230 
resident calls and emails, offering contact information for NGRID, Verizon and Comcast and 
making calls when necessary for residents who were without power and/or telephone service. 

PARKS & GROUNDS, CEMETERY and FORESTRY ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Multiple fertilizer applications - Town and School fields 

Irrigation systems - performed spring and fall maintenance to all Town and School systems 

Applied diamond mix to all Town and School baseball diamonds 

Lower and Upper Shawsheen Field - aerated and seeded the field three times during 

growing season 

South School Fields and Wood Hill and High Plain Fields- aerated and seeded twice 

during growing season 

Snow removal at seven Town buildings 

Deicing all sidewalks at Town owned buildings 

Received Tree City USA designation for the twelfth consecutive year 

Removed ten hazard trees on Cemetery property, continued pruning of low hanging limbs 

throughout the Cemetery 

Responded to 146 requests for tree work from Town residents 

Responded to 22 emergency tree calls from the Andover Police Department 

Planted six new public shade trees during the spring of 201 1 

Bald Hill Recycling Facility - Supervised site monitors and provided support to the 

composting operation, which produced 2,200 cubic yards of processed compost 

Coordinated the installation of the holiday decorations on Main Street (Nov. 201 1) 

Celebrated Arbor Day on April 29, 201 1 at Wood Memorial Park 

47 



The Forestry Division mowed roadside vegetation along 35 miles of Town roads 

22 stumps were ground out, the chips were removed and the areas were loamed & seeded 

Assisted the Department of Public Works with plowing during snow storms 

Repaved 2,300 linear feet of roadway at Spring Grove Cemetery 

Continued weed eradication program throughout the Cemetery grounds 

Continued shrub removal adjacent to head stones throughout the Cemetery grounds 

VEHICLE MAINTENANCE DIVISION 

The Vehicle Maintenance Division is supervised by a Superintendent, who is also 
responsible for purchasing and materials management for all Plant & Facilities operating 
divisions. This division provides maintenance to all Town and School vehicles and major pieces 
of equipment including fire apparatus, police cruisers, DPW trucks and heavy equipment, Plant 
& Facilities trucks and heavy equipment, Town/School emergency generators and other support 
vehicles. The Superintendent of the Vehicle Maintenance Division also coordinates the 
purchasing of all new Town vehicles. 

VEHICLE MAINTENANCE ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Implemented new fleet maintenance software system. 

Updated vehicle diagnostic software, yearly project. 

Provided preventive maintenance and general repairs to 155 Town vehicles, 63 major 

pieces of equipment, 18 emergency generators for School and Town buildings and 56 

smaller pieces of equipment. 

Completed 1,028 work orders totaling 4,662 man hours and $602,910 in labor and 

materials. 

Provided administrative support to vehicle purchases for Town departments. 

Supported the Department of Public Works snow removal operations (equipment 

maintenance, installation and removal of sander units and snow plowing). 

Maintained and repaired all fire apparatus, including assisting with federally-mandated 

inspections of the ladder trucks' hydraulic and pump systems. 

VEHICLE MAINTENANCE STATISTICS 

2009 2010 2011 

Gasoline 
Diesel 
Total Gallons 



FACILITIES SERVICES DIVISION 

The Facilities Services Division is managed by a Supervisor and is responsible for all Town 
custodial services, including support to the Library, Public Safety, Town House, Town Offices, 
and Senior Center. This division also schedules the use and rental of all School buildings, Town 
and School fields, and the Town House function hall for non-profit groups, private organizations, 
individuals, and Town and School activities. The Field House, Dunn Gymnasium, and fields at 
Andover High School and West Middle School are scheduled by the School Athletic 
Department. 

48 



85,648 


81,608 


81,432 


46,571 


42,464 


46,165 


132,219 


124,072 


127,597 



FACILITIES SERVICES ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

Continued support to Town and School energy conservation initiatives. 

Continued program to improve custodial efficiency and cost savings with new labor 

saving equipment and cleaning products. 

Ongoing custodial training on methods and procedures. 

Coordinated meetings with leaders of all private youth sports and Town officials to 

support field maintenance, scheduled programs, and special projects. 

RENTAL ACTIVITY 

The rental numbers reflect the actual permits issued and entered into the accounting system. 
For every rental request received, a permit is issued and an invoice is generated. 

SCHOOLS 

School rentals continued to fill the ten schools in Town however, growth was seen in the 
Department of Community Services, Youth Services and School enrichment program uses. From 
December through April vacation only two schools were available for use in the evening. All 
schools are available for gym use only after 6:00PM and the open schools accommodate mostly 
Town and School programs. Weekend use of schools is not permitted during this timeframe. 

FIELDS 

Town fields were rented to capacity each season in 201 1 . The High School, Department of 
Community Services and Andover Youth Services programs continued to expand. All Youth 
and Adult Leagues were once again asked to maintain their programs at their current size, as 
there is no field space available for program expansion. 

ANDOVER TOWN HOUSE 

The function hall at the Andover Town House is available for rental seven days per week. 
In addition to various private rentals, the Department of Community Services is the most 
frequent weekday user, and also uses the hall for various evening and weekend events. Andover 
Youth Services regularly schedules concerts, dances, and other events at the Town House. The 
Andover Senior Center also hosts social events at the Town House each year. 

FACILITIES SERVICES STATISTICS 

2009 2010 2011 

Schools 

Town Buildings 

Fields 

Total Permits Issued 730 730 698 



594 


601 


566 


63 


83 


74 


73 


63 


58 



49 



PLANT AND FACILITIES STATISTICS 



700 
650 
600 
550 
500 
450 
400 
350 
300 
250 
200 
150 
100 
50 




BUILDING 
RENTAL PERMITS 



615 i-n-i rr\A Cr\1 




. 571 Mi ■• ™ ' ' S6f 




-m 
J: 


1 






"83 


/4 




485 


70 

n 


63 
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-95 

1 


4« 

1 




318 


59 

EL 


^79 



DTOWN RENTALS □ SCHOOL RENTALS 



VEHICLE FUEL CONSUMPTION 



120,000 reo- 

110,000 

100,000 

90,000 

80,000 

70,000 

60,000 

50,000 

40,000 

30,000 

20,000 

10,000 




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110 
100 

90 

80 

70 

60 

50 

40 

30 

20 4 

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SALE OF GRAVE SITES 



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50 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 

The mission of the Department of Public Works is to continuously improve our quality of 
life by providing the finest potable water, state-of-the-art disposal of our wastes (liquid and 
solid) and provide safe travel on our road network. 



ENGINEERING DIVISION 

The Engineering Division performed work in 201 1 for various construction projects such 
as: sewer construction on Lincoln Street, parking lot construction on Pearson Street, drainage 
improvements off Mary Lou Lane, design of upcoming sewer and drainage improvements on 
Williams Street and drainage improvements on Summer Street, Salem Street and Jenkins Road. 

Assistance was provided to the Highway Division during road paving work, various 
drainage, and sidewalk repairs and also to the Water/Sewer Division during various water and 
sewer repairs including construction of water main replacement on Burton Farm Drive and 
Tanglewood Way. 

Work was also performed to continue implementation activities as part of the Town-wide 
program required for compliance with EPA's Phase II Storm water Management regulations, 
activity reports from various Town departments involved in the program were documented and 
utilized for preparation of the annual Stormwater Management report which was submitted to the 
EPA in April. 

Maintenance of the GIS system was performed to continue development of the drainage, 
water and sewer utility layers and various maps were created for other Town departments. 

The design of proposed roads and utilities on new Subdivision and Site Plans were 
checked for the Planning Board and inspections of road and utility construction was performed in 
new developments such as: Avalon at St. Claire, Taylor Cove, Crystal Circle and Northfield 
Commons. Plans for the Bancroft Elementary School replacement were reviewed for proposed 
site and utility construction. 

Street opening permits for the installation and repair of various underground utilities by 
Columbia Gas Company, Verizon, National Grid, Comcast and other private contractors were 
issued and utility markouts and inspections were performed. This year included new gas mains 
on River Road, Stevens Street, Haverhill Street, Morton Street, Shawsheen Road and several 
other locations. Also, State-mandated Trench Permits were issued as required for various trench 
excavations. 

The Engineering Division also provided and maintained records of various utilities, street 
excavations, residential and industrial site development, street layouts and CH90 road paving. 



51 



ENGINEERING DIVISION STATISTICS 





2009 


2010 


2011 


Storm Drain Design & Construction (ft.) 


1,507 


1,274 


L 895 


Sewer Main Design & Construction (ft.) 





210 


1,196 


Water Main Design & Construction (ft.) 





4,000 


5,160 


Sidewalk Design & Construction (ft.) 


330 


324 


390 


Streets Resurfaced (miles) 


4.7 


5.6 


3.8 


Street Opening Permits Issued & Inspected 


179 


291 


157 


Subdivision/Site Plans reviewed (# plans/# lots) 


14/35 


8/18 


11/11 


Subdivision/site Construction Inspections/Tests: 








Water mains (ft.) 


4,381 


3,539 


5,724 


Sewer mains (ft.) 


694 


1,796 


974 


Drain lines (ft.) 


454 


3,434 


6,569 


Sidewalks (ft.) 


1,314 


638 


1,410 


Roads Paved: 




1,152 
1,993 


4,086 
469 


2,421 
1,516 


GIS utility layer edits 


10 


13 


10 


Trench Permits issued (new 2009) 


49 


70 


46 



HIGHWAY DIVISION 

The Highway Division is responsible for road maintenance which includes rebuilding and 
resurfacing approximately 200 miles of existing roads. The Division is also responsible for the 
maintenance of the Town's sidewalk infrastructure. 

During the Fall, Spring and Summer months, two sweepers are continuously kept busy 
cleaning Winter sand off all streets and cleaning road construction areas. A few days per week 
the sweepers start work at 5:00 A.M. to take advantage of low traffic and parking conditions 
especially in business areas. 

The Division also assists the Engineering Division in inspecting new roads prior to 
acceptance as public ways. The Division is responsible for the cleaning and maintenance of all 
storm water culverts and drainage systems including catch basin and pipe cleaning as well as 
maintenance of water courses on public property impaired by beaver dams. 

The Highway Division is the lead agency responsible for snow and ice removal and flood 
control measures - other Town divisions assist in these operations. 



52 



HIGHWAY DIVISION STATISTICS 





2009 


2010 


2011 


Number of streets resurfaced 


8 


6 


14 


Total number of miles of road resurfaced 


4.7 


4.95 


5 


Total number of feet of curbs constructed 


13,500 


10,000 


2,175 


Catch basins cleaned 


1530 


1781 


1903 


Storm drains/culverts cleaned 


189 


226 


89 


Catch basins repaired 


61 


72 


58 


Storm drains repaired 


18 


32 


26 


Snow storms 


10 


5 


8 


Sanding events 


18 


14 


16 


Signs repaired/installed 


338 


259 


124 


Masonry wall repairs 


17 


6 


8 


Sidewalk Design & Construction (If) 






4750 



WATER TREATMENT PLANT 

During 2011, the treatment plant processed more than 2.6 billion gallons of water - a 
daily average of 7.23 million gallons - to produce over 2 billion gallons of finish water delivered 
to the distribution system. To augment available water supplies, 1.4 billion gallons were 
diverted from the Merrimack River to Haggetts Pond through the Fish Brook pump station. The 
Fish Brook station was online for a total of 189 days over the course of the year. The chart 
below illustrates the breakdown of total water consumption. 

WATER TREATMENT PLANT STATISTICS 





2009 


2010 


2011 


Gallons of water treated (in billions) 


2200 


2548 


2.640 


Average daily gallons pumped (in million gal.) 


6.2 


6.9 


7.2 


Maximum day (in million gallons) 


11.56 


13.70 


13.57 



The Treatment Plant staff partnered with the Executive Office of Energy and 
Environmental Affairs and U.S.EPA, in their Energy Management Round Table for Water 
Utilities. As a result of this partnership the Water Treatment Plant was named a Leader in Energy 
Efficiency and Clean Energy, by both agencies. An energy evaluation was performed system 
wide in cooperation with National Grid, which will result in an energy management and 
efficiency plan to optimize energy use and costs in the years ahead. 

The Water Treatment Plant Laboratory maintains yearly State Certification for potable 
and non-potable water analyses for chemical and biological testing and analyzes over 1000 
revenue generating samples per year for neighboring towns while reporting hundreds of in-house 
results. 



53 



During the 4 compliance periods of 2011, all state required water testing was completed 
with no violations. This testing included volatiles organic compounds, secondary contaminants, 
synthetics organic compounds, disinfection byproducts, perchlorate, nitrites, nitrates, inorganic 
contaminants and bromate. Weekly bacteria testing of the treated water and distribution system 
were all negative for microbiological contaminants including total coliform and E. Coli. 

The Treatment Plant is also a member of the Northeast Merrimack Valley Chemical 
Consortium, a group of over 40 cities and towns combining their buying power to order 
treatment chemicals in bulk for much lower prices. 

All operators maintained current licensing, including five operators holding 4C licenses, 
three holding 4T licenses and two holding 3D licenses. Mandated five year review and update of 
the Drought Management Plan and Emergency Response Plan were completed. In 2011, major 
projects completed included replacement of emergency lighting systems, battery back up 
systems, and fire alarm panels system wide. Total replacement of two pre-treatment unit sludge 
collection systems was also completed. 

WTP staff also held seats on the New England Water Works Association (NEWWA) 
Disinfection Committee, Residuals Committee and Safety Committee, as well as contributed to 
classes offered by NEWWA on various pertinent topics. WTP staff also collaborated with the 
Greenscapes North Shore Initiative to bring the Greenscapes 2010 Program to Andover in 
fulfillment of Water Management Act and Stormwater Management requirements. 





cu.ft 


gallons 


Percent 
Usage 


Percent 
Change 


Residential 


98,756,937 


738,701,889 


40% 


-11.21% 












Commercial 


39,646,909 


296,558,879 


16% 


-5.78% 












Industrial 


38,745,753 


289,818,232 


16% 


-7.20% 












Irrigation 


23,730,104 


177,501,178 


10% 


-18.35% 












Agricultural 


67,450 


504,526 


0.03% 


-24.79% J 












Municipal 


1,290,432 


9,652,431 


1% 


-53.27% 












North 
Reading 


45,616,446 


341,211,016 


18% 


5.88% 












Total 


247,854,031 


1,853,948,152 




-8.22% 



54 



WATER DISTRIBUTION 

The Water Distribution Division consists of six (6) licensed distribution operators that are 
responsible for the maintenance and repair of the water infrastructure. The distribution system 
consists of 250 miles of water mains, 6" to 24" in diameter, 2,100 fire hydrants for fire 
suppression service, 1 1,000 water service accounts, 4,800 water gate valves and 5 water storage 
tanks. 

WATER DISTRIBUTION STATISTICS 





2009 


2010 


2011 


Hydrants Repaired 


189 


150 


172 


Hydrants Replaced 


9 


9 


14 


Hydrants Inspected & Serviced 


275 


210 


246 


Hydrants Flushed 


230 


167 


275 


Water Main Breaks Repaired 


26 


18 


13 


House Service Leaks Repaired 


15 


11 


11 


House Services Renewed 


16 


20 


11 


New Water Meter Accounts/Installations 


68 


39 


41 


Old Water Meters Replaced (Town) 


121 


28 


440 


Water Meters bench checked 


12 


6 


4 


Water Shut Offs/Turn On 


285 


418 


105 


Gate & Service Boxes Adjusted 


96 


33 


141 



SEWER DIVISION 

The Sewer Division is responsible for the operation and maintenance of thirteen (13) 
wastewater pumping stations and the entire system of sanitary sewers. The sewerage system 
includes 150 miles of sanitary sewers, 6,200 connections and 3,300 sewer manholes. The raw 
sewage discharge from the Shawsheen Village Pumping Station is transported by means of a 
force main and 48" gravity system through the City of Lawrence to the Greater Lawrence 
Sanitary District's Regional Treatment Plant in North Andover for treatment. 

SEWER STATISTICS 





2009 


2010 


2011 


Sewer Main Blocks Cleared 


6 


4 


6 


Sewer Main Rodded - Regular Maintenance 


140 


62 


137 


Sewer Mains Repaired/Replaced 


2 


2 


6 


Sewer Mains Rodded - leased Flusher 


32 


43 


49 


Sewer manholes repaired /replaced 






5 



55 



SOLID WASTE / RECYCLING 

Andover's refuse is transported and processed at the Regional Waste-to-Energy Plant, 
Wheelabrator, located in North Andover, where the refuse is incinerated to generate electricity. 
The Solid Waste Division oversees the mandatory curbside recycling program for 
newspapers/magazines, junk mail, office paper, cardboard, telephone books, paperboard, steel/tin 
metal containers, glass, #1 thru #7 plastics and aluminum containers. The Town negotiated to 
earn a paper credit when the New England index ("Yellow Sheet") price for news #6 is above 
$3 0/ton. We earned a total credit of $3 1 ,2 1 6 last year. 

SOLID WASTE / RECYCLING STATISTICS 





2009 


2010 


2011 


Tons of residential refuse collected 


9,874 


9,867 


9,506 


Tons of mixed residential paper 


2,185 


1,917 


2,189 


Tons of corrugated containers 


350 


332 


340 


Tons of glass recycled 


896 


898 


1,020 


Tons of steel/tin containers recycled 


53 


53 


60 


Tons of #1 thru #7 plastics 


53 


53 


60 


Tons of aluminum materials 


53 


53 


60 


Tons of leaves & grass clipping composted 


6,875 


6,525 


6,675 



56 



PUBLIC WORKS STATISTICS 



STREET BERM CONSTRUCTION 



26,000 

24,000 

22,000 

20,000 

18,000 

16,000 

t 14,000 

£ 12,000 

10,000 

8,000 

6,000 

4,000 

2,000 






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2,800 
2,600 
2,400 
2,200 
2,000 
1,800 
1,600 
1,400 
1,200 
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PUBLIC WORKS STATISTICS 



BASINS, DRAINS & CULVERTS 
CLEANED 




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SEWER MAINS CLEANED & MAINTAINED 








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6,000 

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58 



MEMORIAL HALL LIBRARY 

Memorial Hall Library is a community partner dedicated to helping the Town ofAndover 
and its citizens realize their full potential. Library patrons experience Memorial Hall Library as 
a responsive, vital resource meeting their individual needs and offering a memorable and 
personal library experience. Lives are enriched through a lifelong relationship with ideas, art, 
literature, information and technology. 



201 1 was an exciting year of change for the Memorial Hall Library. The year ended with 
sharply increased circulation and a beautifully renovated main Reading Room. The Library's 
increasing usage, both in terms of items circulated and number of visitors, is due to the following 
factors: 

■ An improved main Reading Room with the addition of a new paint color, outside views, 
new face-out book shelving, improved magazine shelving, comfortable chairs and 
additional tables; 

The convenience of shelf-pickup of holds and self-checkout of materials; 
More available parking spaces; 

Increased awareness of what the Library has to offer due to the huge influx of visitors 
during the Halloween snowstorm in October; 
Removal of DVD rental fees; 
More customer-friendly circulation policies; 
Quality programming for children, teens and adults; and 
A new MVLC-shared automation system which offers improved patron account features. 



OTHER NEW SERVICES/ 

IMPROVEMENTS 

Working fireplace 

Projection improvement in Memorial Hall 

Re-landscaped the Main Street entrance 

New DVD and paperback shelving 

Improved display and access to magazines 



LIBRARY DATA 

Total Items 
Circulation 
Attendance 
Adult/Teen Programs 
Attendance 
Children's Programs 
Attendance 

Reference Transactions 
Computer Signups 
Number of Volunteers 
Use of Meeting Rooms 



VERY POPULAR SERVICES 

Ability to place requests in the online catalog 

Teen/Children's collections and programs 

Museum Passes 

Downloadable content 



2011 

237,978 

505,204 

452,075 

293 

6,691 

473 

10,476 

65,961 

89,368 

148 

687 



zines Public 


computers 


2009 


2010 


253,511 


253,391 


530,425 


509,284 


407,121 


445,861 


312 


299 


7,539 


7,020 


445 


461 


8,133 


8,884 


67,362 


67,195 


73,570 


76,124 


242 


242 


749 


692 



59 



LIBRARY STATISTICS 



400,000 
350,000 
300,000 
250,000 
200,000 
150,000 
100,000 
50,000 



BOOKS & PERIODICALS 



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100,000 
95,000 
90,000 
85,000 
80,000 
75,000 
70,000 
65,000 
60,000 
55,000 
50,000 
45,000 
40,000 
35,000 
30,000 



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175,000 

150,000 

125,000 

100,000 

75,000 

50,000 

25,000 



NON-PRINT CIRCULATION 





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60 



DEPARTMENT OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY 

The mission of the Department of Information Technology is to act both as a catalyst for 
innovation as well as to provide planning, coordination and management in all areas of 
information systems and technologies in support of the operational missions of all Town of 
Andover departments and the Andover Public School District. 



The Department of Information Technology provides centralized information and 
technology support and services to all Town departments and the Andover Public Schools. The 
central IT Department is led by the Chief Information Officer (CIO) who reports to the Town 
Manager and the Superintendent of Schools. 

Accomplishments for 201 1 include: 

Completed the hiring of the new Chief Information Officer. 

Completed the organization and technological integration of Town, School, Library and 
Public Safety IT teams and networks. 

Introduced iPad technology into several classrooms to develop a pilot for enhanced 
digital learning. 

Developed a preliminary strategic IT plan. 

Initiated an on-line service call tracking system. 

Completed negotiations for lowering the cost of ownership for all Microsoft technology. 

Completed the transition of the Town/School accounting system to Microsoft database 
platform. 

Introduced the MIMAP GIS portal. 

Continued the expansion of classroom "Smartboard" technology initiative. 

Consulted with Department Heads, School Administrators and IT staff on a regular basis 
to identify, address and plan for department and program specific technology needs. 



61 



COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT & PLANNING 

BUILDING DIVISION 

The mission of the Building Division is to ensure the health, safety and welfare of the 
Town's residents and visitors, as well as to protect the value of the historic district and historic 
structures in the Town through the enforcement of State and local laws, by-laws and regulations. 

The Building Division is charged with the enforcement of The Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts Building Code, 780 CMR, Architectural Access Board Rules and Regulations, 
521 CMR, The Zoning Act, Chapter 40A of the Massachusetts General Laws, the Andover 
Zoning Bylaw, Article VIII, Section 33, Demolition of Historically Significant Buildings, 
Section 36, BallardVale Historic District Bylaw and Section 37, Chimneys, of Article XII of the 
Town of Andover Code of Bylaws, as well as other applicable Town and State laws and 
regulations. The Building Division reviews all documentation (plans and specifications) 
submitted with applications for permits and issues all permits required for construction and other 
applicable activities for which permits are required by law. The Division performs all required 
site inspections as well as Code mandated safety inspections. The Building Division responds to 
customer inquiries, complaints and emergencies. Finally, the Building Division assists other 
Divisions of the Department of Community Development and Planning, as needed, in their 
permit processing and enforcement and attends, when necessary, Zoning Board of Appeals, 
Planning Board and other Commission meetings. 

BUILDING DIVISION STATISTICAL INFORMATION 



Permit Type 


2009 


2010 


2011 


New Dwellings 


16 


25 


36 


Additions/Alterations to Single 
Family Dwellings 


755 


909 


950 


New Multi-Family Dwellings 


1 


3 


1 


Additions/Alterations to Multi- 
Family Dwellings 


10 


14 


13 


New Commercial & Industrial 
Buildings 


1 


2 





Additions/Alterations to 
Commercial and Industrial 
Buildings 


129 


109 


120 


Schools/Public Buildings 


20 


14 


11 


Swimming Pools 


11 


18 


21 


Signs, Chimneys, Woodburning 
Stoves, Raze Permits 


71 


92 


78 


Certificates of Inspection 


59 


50 


42 


Zoning Verification 


118 


97 


108 


Total Fees Collected 


$739,696 


1,076,325 


872,836 


Total Estimated Value 


$55,919,813 


$80,596,147 


$64,597,352 



62 



ELECTRICAL 

The purpose of the Massachusetts Electrical Code is safeguarding the general public and 
property from the hazards arising from the use of electricity. The Electrical Inspector is 
responsible for reviewing and granting permits and scheduling inspections on a daily basis for 
residential, commercial and industrial jobs, assisting the Police and Fire Departments in the 
investigation of accidents and fires. Electrical work includes, but is not limited to, wiring for 
lighting, power, fire alarms, security alarms, telephone and other similar devices, installation of 
equipment for emergency power, generators, transformers, switch gear equipment, panel boards 
and similar equipment. The Electrical Inspector also reviews violations of the Electrical Code 
and inspects the corrective work for protection of the users and cooperates with the various 
electric companies that service the area. 

2009 2010 2011 



Electrical Permits 


911 


1151 


1304 


Fees Collected 


$83,474 


$127,209 


$149,076 


PLUMBING AND GAS 









All plumbing and gas fitting installations are controlled through enforcement of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts State Uniform Plumbing and Gas Code, formulated by the 
Board of State Examiners of Plumbers and Gas Fitters under Massachusetts General Laws, 
Chapter 142. 

The Plumbing and Gas Inspector issues permits for the installation of gas piping, 
plumbing and sewer installations and repairs. The Inspector assists the Fire Department with gas 
related fire emergencies. Inspections are conducted as necessary to ensure public safety and 
compliance with State Codes. Complaints and violations are also investigated and corrected or 
reported to the proper authorities. 



2009 2010 2011 



Plumbing Permits 


533 


696 


698 


Plumbing Fees Collected 


$34,199 


$46,732 


$49,230 


Gas Permits 


458 


625 


637 


Gas Fees Collected 


$23,111 


$33,089 


$34,969 



63 



CONSERVATION DIVISION 

The mission of the Conservation Commission is to protect Andover's natural resources and 
to act as trustees in perpetuity of the Town 's conservation land. 



The Conservation Division is responsible for the protection of Andover's rivers, lakes 
and wetlands and provides staff support to the Andover Conservation Commission. The 
Commission's principal duties include enforcement and administration of the Massachusetts 
Wetlands Protection Act and the Andover Wetlands Protection Bylaw (regulation of residential, 
industrial and commercial development activity in or near flood plains, water bodies, and 
wetland areas). The Commission also is responsible for the acquisition and maintenance of 
Town-owned Conservation Land. The Conservation Commission consists of seven volunteer 
members who are appointed annually by the Town Manager to staggered three-year terms. 

In the coming year, the Commission and Conservation Overseer Coordinator will host a meeting 
for the network of Conservation trail volunteers. The Commission will continue to work on 
restoration of the Shawsheen River including opening the lower reaches by removing the 
Balmoral Dam in Shawsheen Square. The Commission is currently looking into improving the 
public access and enjoyment areas along the Merrimack River, the passive recreation interests of 
the conservation land on the former Reichhold site and other Town reservations. 

Conservation Land Improvement & Community Outreach 

The Conservation Division had a great year for land improvement of our nearly 2000- 
acres of Conservation Land. Volunteers cleared new trails and re-opened others throughout our 
Reservations. The Commission is currently working with local dog owners to establish a dog 
walking park on High Plain Road. 

The Commission continues to enjoy one of the largest partnerships with local scout 
organizations in the state. This year several advanced Scout projects were completed including 
the construction of a sixty foot bridge at the new Foster's Pond Reservation, a new 100-foot 
boardwalk was constructed at Rachel Road, benches were installed on Fishbrook North, cleanup 
was completed in the park at Rogers Dell and a Tewksbury Boy Scouts Troop built new benches 
at Pole Hill. There are currently a total of eight Eagle Scout projects and three Girl Scout Golden 
projects scheduled for 2012. The Commission built several rustic camping areas for the Boy 
Scouts, Girl Scouts and other group programs and has established a popular monthly overnight 
camping series that is open to the general public. With the assistance of volunteers from the 
South Church, the Free Christian Church, students from Phillips Academy and the Pike School 
and the Andover Trails Committee, new community pathways have been built on several 
reservations under the supervision of the Commission's Special Project Manager Robert 
DeCelle. 



64 



CONSERVATION DIVISION STATISTICS 


2010 


2011 




Conservation Commission Meetings 


27 


23 


PUBLIC HEARINGS & PUBLIC MEETINGS 


131 


142 


ABBREVIATED NOTICE OF RESOURCE AREA DELINEATION 


2 


3 


ORDERS OF CONDITIONS ISSUED 


16 


26 


AMENDED ORDER OF CONDITIONS ISSUED 


2 


3 


CERTIFICATE OF COMPLIANCE ISSUED 


26 


14 


DETERMINATIONS OF APPLICABILITY ISSUED 


54 


46 


EXTENSION PERMITS 


17 


1* 


NOTIFICATION OF SATISFACTORY COMPLETION OF WORK 


22 


21 


FINDINGS OF SIGNIFICANCE ISSUED 


14 


19 


ENFORCEMENT ORDERS ISSUED 


6 


20 


EMERGENCY CERTIFICATIONS 


5 


16 


APPEALS 


- 


6 


SUPERIOR COURT APPEALS 


- 


3 


CESSATIONS 


- 


8 


OVERSEER APPOINTMENTS 


- 


10 


ACRES OF CONSERVATION LAND ACQUIRED 


14.5 





WETLAND FILING FEES COLLECTED 


$16,775 


$13,000 


FINES (TICKETS) COLLECTED 


$3,000 


$200 



*Note: This figure is low due to the fact that the State's Permit Extension Act was signed into law 
extending any existing permit or those in effect between August 15, 2008 through August 15, 2010, 
therefore, granting a two year automatic extension by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. 



65 



HEALTH DIVISION 

The mission of the Andover Board of Health is to promote and protect the public health 
including the physical, mental, emotional and social wellness of all the people. 

The Health Division is responsible for ensuring the protection of the public and 
environmental health. The inspectional staff supervises the inspection and public health 
education programs in matters dealing with the State Sanitary Code and the State Environmental 
Code, including complaint investigation, wastewater disposal, food safety, swimming pool 
operations, recreational camp programs, and many other services. The Public Health Nursing 
staff is primarily responsible for all medical clinical administrative matters, including 
communicable disease investigations, vaccination programs, and health promotion programs. 
The Director of Public Health serves as staff supervisor, ensuring that public health programs are 
offered in a coordinated manner, and is the liaison to various boards. The Director designs, 
programs, and implements policies as proposed by the Andover Board of Health to meet the 
health needs of the community. The Board of Health consists of three volunteer members 
appointed by the Town Manager for staggered three-year terms. 

Issues of note from 201 1 include: 

The Public Health Nurses continues their successful Shingles Vaccination Program 

through a generous grant from the Andover Home for Aged Persons. This program has 

served over 585 residents over the age of 60 and has been held out as an example to area 

communities. 

The Health Division is the host agency for the Greater River Valley Medical Reserve 

Corps which is part of the National Citizen Corps Program. There are approximately 196 

volunteers from the seven-member communities who assist with health-related responses 

in the community. 

A poor economy often makes the Division's job harder as residents and businesses defer 

routine maintenance due to financial issues. This result is the need for more enforcement 

action. 



HEALTH DIVISION STATISTICS 

Board of Health Meetings 
Plan Reviews 
Food Inspections 
Environmental Inspections 
Complaints Received 
Administrative Hearings 
Total Permits Issued 
Fees Collected 



2009 



2010 



2011 



12 


12 


11 


243 


269 


263 


453 


278 


416 


346 


322 


284 


114 


138 


126 


2 


4 


4 


1337 


1309 


1438 



$140,034.48 $145,244.11 $134,255.03 



66 



HEALTH CLINIC STATISTICS 2009 

Outreach Clinics 

Attendance 

Senior Center Clinics 

Attendance 

Office Visits 

Home Visits 

Recreational Camps for Children/Clinical Inspection 21 

Influenza Immunization 

Pneumonia Immunization 

Cholesterol Screening Clinics 

Cholesterol Screening Attendance 

Mantoux Tuberculin testing 

Positive Reactor Follow Up 

T.B. Clinic Case History, Appts. & Follow-Up 

Latent T.B. Infection Reports 

Zostavax (Shingles) Vaccine Clinics Attendance 

*(Influenza Immunization figures include H1N1 immunizations.) 

COMMUNICABLE DISEASES 



2010 



2011 



20 


21 


20 


209 


236 


213 


50 


51 


49 


531 


544 


478 


280 


255 


235 


27 


20 


10 


>n 21 


18 


17 


3485* 


1776 


1893 


13 


20 


6 


5 


3 


4 


25 


27 


24 


11 


12 


15 


1 


8 


16 


17 


31 


54 


11 


27 


35 


78 


80 


92 



Animal Bites 


25 


31 


33 


Babesiosis 


1 


1 





Chicken Pox 


11 


8 


5 


Campylobacter 


7 


5 


12 


Cryptosporidiosis 


1 


3 


3 


Dengue Fever 





1 


1 


E.coli 0157.H7/Shega toxin 


1 


1 


1 


Ehrlichiosis/HGA 


3 


6 


6 


Giardia 


3 


5 


3 


Hepatitis A 


1 








Hepatitis B 


6 


10 


14 


Hepatitis C 


13 


14 


20 


Influenza A 


14 


1 


4 


Invasive gr A Strep 





1 


2 


Legionellosis 





1 


1 


Lyme Disease (Confirmed/Probable) 


44 


39 


17 


Lyme Disease (Suspect) 


76 


27 


55 


Meningitus (Viral) 





2 


1 


Pertussis 


1 





2 


Salmonella 


9 


6 


5 


Strep Pneumonia 


3 


2 


2 


Group B Strep 


1 





3 


Tuberculosis (Active) 


1 





1 


Tuberculosis (Suspect) 





1 


2 


Yersiniosis 








2 


Suspect Disease Requiring Follow-up 


14 


26 


22 



67 



HEALTHY COMMUNITIES TOBACCO CONTROL PROGRAM 

The Healthy Communities Tobacco Control Program is a State-funded entity. The 
Program is a collaborative made up of Boards of Health from surrounding communities charged 
with the responsibility of enforcing State tobacco regulations and laws and Andover's bylaws 
that prohibit the sale of tobacco products to minors. With Andover as the lead agency, the 
collaborative recently grew with the latest round of funding and membership now includes 
Amesbury, Billerica, Dracut, Georgetown, Groveland, Haverhill, Lynnfield, Methuen, 
Middleton, Newbury, Newburyport, North Andover, North Reading, Rowley, Salisbury, 
Tewksbury and Topsfield. 

Previous funding allowed for quarterly checks to ensure that retailers were not selling 
tobacco products to minors, however, current funding now only allows for checks to be 
conducted once a year along with physical inspections of the retailers. 

GREATER LAWRENCE BIOTERRORISM PREPAREDNESS COALITION 

The Greater Lawrence Public Health Coalition is comprised of seven community health 
departments including Andover, North Andover, Lawrence, Methuen, North Reading, Reading 
and Lynnfield working together to improve both regional and community capability to respond 
to public health emergencies. The Town of Andover serves as the fiscal agent for the Coalition. 
In February of 2012, Reading left the coalition, and in August of 2012, Wilmington will join it. 

Coalition activities are funded by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Cooperative 
Agreement on Public Health Preparedness and Response for Bioterrorism through a grant 
awarded by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health. Additionally, the coalition 
continues to speak regionally to public health issues, including food protection, housing issues 
and vector borne diseases. 

GREATER RIVER VALLEY MEDICAL RESERVE CORPS 

The Greater River Valley Medical Reserve Corps (GRV MRC) was formed in 2007 and 
consists of the same seven communities as the Preparedness Coalition. The Medical Reserve 
Corps is a component of the Federal Citizens Corps and local units, such as the GRV, exist to 
assist communities in both emergency and non-emergency situations. Units are community- 
based and function as a way to organize and utilize both medical and non-medical volunteers. 
These volunteers supplement existing local emergency and public health resources. Activities 
are funded by grants from the CDC, Massachusetts Department of Public Health and other 
National/Federal grant sources. The GRV MRC currently boasts a membership of approximately 
1 96 volunteers. 



68 



PLANNING DIVISION 

The mission of the Planning Division is to ensure the orderly growth and development of 
the Town through sound planning practices and through the implementation of the 
recommendations of the Master Plan. 

Economic Development 

Downtown: The Planning Division implemented several downtown initiatives: Amended 
parking regulations in the General Business and Mixed Use Zoning District to be more flexible 
and business friendly. Downtown welcomed several new businesses: Orange Leaf, Nest, 
LeBlanc's Fine Wine, Festejos Decorations, the Ivory Corset and Bobbles and Lace. 

Town Yard: The Planning Division's long range economic initiatives for the downtown include 
the Town Yard relocation and redevelopment project. The Town Yard Task Force (created in 
2007) is charged with evaluating the reuse and redevelopment of the Town Yard and to consider 
relocating the existing facility that is in very poor condition. Utilizing grant funds, consultant's 
evaluated the property, the market, and potential redevelopment. The final report recommends 
relocating the existing facility and to prepare the area for redevelopment through a controlled 
process that reflects the character of a Central Business District. Please visit the website: 
http ://andoverma. gov/planning/to wnyard/ for more information. 

Economic Development Council : An Economic Development Council (EDC) will be appointed 
in 2012. The EDC will be charged to develop and implement a proactive economic development 
strategy that addresses issues relating to economic development, business retention and job 
creation. Their focus will be to ensure that businesses thrive in Andover as well as attract 
businesses interested in locating here. The Council will be comprised of business and building 
owners and managers. 

Housing 

The Board of Trustees for the Affordable Housing Trust Fund (AHTF) awards 
approximately $60,000 each year in grant money through efforts of the Planning Division and 
the North Shore HOME Consortium. Since inception, over $245,000 has been awarded to 
Andover and has created 10 permanently affordable housing units scattered throughout Town. 
The Planning Division continues to monitor the existing affordable housing stock so that units 
are not lost. Each time there is a resale of an existing affordable unit, the Planning Division is 
actively involved to maintain Andover' s official Subsidized Housing Inventory with the State. 

Franciscan Overlay District 

To help manage change and provide for the immediate and future needs of the aging 
population, the Andover Planning Board and Board of Selectmen seek to study the feasibility of 
creating an overlay zoning district encompassing the present Franciscan Center and abutting 
properties along River Road. With over 8,600 of the 34,000 residences in Town being over 55 
years of age, the Town has a unique opportunity to proactively address the community need of 
providing housing alternatives. 

69 



The Task Force has been charged to foster and develop an overlay district for the present 
Franciscan Center and abutting properties along River Road. The district shall closely examine 
key issues affecting the aging population; alternative housing options, affordability, existing 
zoning & constraints, economic development, transportation, impact to community services, 
protection of sensitive habitat and neighborhood & building character. 

Sustainability 

In collaboration with the Andover Green Advisory Board and the Plant & Facilities 
Department, the Planning Division has organized an in-depth investigation of leasing municipal 
land for solar energy facilities. An agreement would allow for the installation of ground 
mounted solar photovoltaic on several strategic Town-owned properties at no cost to the Town 
with the opportunity for substantial financial return. In addition to the financial benefits, the 
Town's "Solar Team" is extending the reach of this project by working with the Sustainable 
Andover Internship Program. Interns are developing a curriculum to be shared with all Andover 
schools and other communities. 

Master Plan 

The Planning Division worked towards the adoption of the new Master Plan in January, 
2012 following two years of research, meetings and planning. The Master Plan was created in- 
house by staff, the Planning Board and a Steering Committee. The updated Master Plan 
describes the Town's vision for the future and establishes a foundation for future growth. It will 
be used to prioritize action items, a plan for change and contain sections on Community 
Sustainability, Public Health and the Environment. Boards and Commissions will use the Master 
Plan as a framework for decision making. 

Planning Division - General Responsibilities 

The Planning Division staff worked on Open Space Preservation, created Geographical 
Information System (GIS) maps for various Town departments, negotiated with numerous 
subdivision and site plan proposals to achieve the best possible development on the Town's 
diminishing vacant lands, continued to encourage Low Impact Development techniques for all 
new development proposals to enhance compatibility with existing neighborhoods and mitigated 
environmental impacts to the greatest extent possible. In 2011, the Planning Board held 21 
public meetings and advertised and conducted 30 Public Hearings. Revenues collected in 2011 
totaled $8,992. 



70 



ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS 

The Andover Zoning Board of Appeals is authorized to function under the General Laws 
of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Chapter 40A, applicable sections of Chapter 40B and 
the Town's Zoning Bylaw. The Board meets on the first Thursday of each month in The Hall, 
2 nd Floor, Memorial Hall Library, 2 North Main Street, Elm Square. The Board of Selectmen 



appoints five regular members and four associate members, 
are the result of applications in the following areas: 



The public hearings by the Board 



■ A Variance from the requirements of the Zoning Bylaw; 

■ A Special Permit under the Zoning Bylaw; 

A person aggrieved by the decision of the Inspector of Buildings or other 
Administrative Official; 

■ A modification or an extension of a decision; or 

Permission to construct low or moderate income housing within the Town 
(Comprehensive Permit M.G.L. Chapter 40B). 

Prior to the hearings, applications are reviewed and pertinent plans and sketches are 
requested, legal advertisements are published and abutters are notified as required by law. The 
Chairman, in conformity with the Board of Appeals Rules and Regulations, conducts public 
hearings. Following the hearings, the members of the Board, when deemed necessary, view each 
property in question and hold a deliberation meeting thereafter. Based on the evidence presented 
at the hearing, and the applicable laws, a decision is rendered, signed and filed with the Town 
Clerk and recorded at the Registry of Deeds upon completion of the statutory appeal period. 



ZONING BOARD OF APPEALS STATISTICS 





2009 


2010 


2011 


Public Hearing Meetings 


18 


13 


26 


Deliberations Only 


3 


2 





Cases Filed 


46 


46 


57 


Cases Approved 


29 


35 


47 


Cases Denied/Moot 


10 


4 


5 


Cases Withdrawn 


4 


5 


2 


Continuances 


3 


3 


2 


Fees Collected 


$13,884 


$13,400 


$37, 925 



71 



1000 
950 
900 
850 
800 
750 
700 
650 
600 
550 
500 



BUILDING STATISTICS 



SINGLE FAMILY 
ADDITIONS & ALTERATIONS 



948 



950 



-875" 



^P j 880 



-627- 



909 



_832_ 



768 755 



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NEW DWELLINGS 




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BUILDING PERMITS 




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PERMIT FEE REVENUE 



$1,900,000 

$1,700,000 

$1,500,000 

$1,300,000 

$1,100,000 

$900,000 

$700,000 

$500,000 I 

$300,000 



$100,000 



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72 






PLANNING AND PUBLIC HEALTH STATISTICS 



160 

150 

140 

130 

120 

110 

100 

90 

80 

70 

60 

50 

40 

30 



PLANNING BOARD 
PUBLIC HEARINGS 




J 



VACCINATIONS 

(2009 Includes 1,224 H1N1 Vacs.) 



4,250 
3,750 
3,250 
2,750 
2,250 
1,750 
1,250 f 

750 

250 



tMn^-Lnvorxooo^o 

OOOOOOOOi-H 



PLANNING DIVISION 
PLAN REVIEWS 



60 

50 

40 

30 

20 \ 

10 



33 



27 



28 



22 



27 



OO00OOO0>-l!-l 



□ Preliminary Subdivision 
■ Site Plan Reviews 



□ Definitive Subdivision 
DANR Plans 



J 



PUBLIC HEALTH 

COMMUNICABLE DISEASE 

SURVEILLANCE 




73 



DIVISION OF COMMUNITY SERVICES 

Community Services provides Andover residents with a myriad of social, educational, 
cultural, and recreational opportunities while embracing diversity and accessibility for all ages. 
Community Services strives to rate the pulse of the community and incorporate those ideas into 
valued programs for its citizens now and into the future. 



Community Services, better known as DCS, was established years ago as a traditional 
recreation department. As Andover grew, the department embraced a wider mission. Today, the 
Division is comprised of five full-time staff, hundreds of part-time adult and student employees, 
vendors and volunteers who provide over 500 programs, events and trips for our residents each 
year. The DCS office is located on the second floor of the Andover Town Offices, 36 Bartlet 
Street, and offers customer service from 8:30 A.M. - 4:30 P.M., Monday through Friday. Online 
registration for DCS programs is available 24/7 through the website at www. ando verma. go v/dcs . 

Daytime, after-school, evening, online and Summer vacation programs are held 
throughout town. DCS utilizes Andover' s fine public and private facilities including the public 
schools, the Greater Lawrence Technical High School, Kid's Club and the Old Town Hall for its 
programs. Special events and concerts are held in The Park, tennis lessons at Recreation Park, 
adult co-ed softball leagues on Town fields and swimming and boating programs at Pomps Pond. 
Outdoor sports programs for children are held on fields throughout the town. 

DCS continues to make improvements to Recreation Park and Pomps Pond. Improve- 
ments include upgrades to the waterfront area, repairs to the softball fence, landscaping and 
trimming paths in the woods to enhance the general appearance of the complex. Pomps Pond 
was designated as a drop-off spot for tree debris as a result of the October 201 1 snow storm. The 
wood chips, produced from the debris, will be used to create additional parking spots at the 
Pond. 

Customer service has been improved by streamlining many of the procedures and 
updating the appearance of the office. More than 32% of all DCS registrations are being 
completed online allowing for after-hour and weekend registrations. The convenience of online 
registration benefits both the participants and the staff. As Andover continues to grow and 
change, DCS adapts and changes to meet the needs of the community. You may now find 
Community Services on Facebook and Linkedln and follow them on Twitter. 

DCS PROGRAMS 

Community Donations 

Opportunities to help neighbors in need include the Mitten Tree, providing mittens at the 
holidays, Holiday Gift Baskets, providing comfort to Andover' s elderly and Camperships for 
children enrolled in DCS Summer programs. Andover residents are generous when they donate 
to the camperships by "rounding up" when registering for a DCS program. 



74 



Classes & Programs 

A comprehensive program booklet is mailed to Andover residents in early January, June 
and September. Information for all programs, trips and special events for the upcoming season 
are found in the booklets. The current booklet and registration information can also be found at 
www.andoverma. gov/dcs . 

Community Trips 

Each season DCS offers trips to a variety of locations. Some favorites include New York 
City shopping at the holidays, Washington DC for the Cherry Blossoms, Foxwoods Casino, 
Martha's Vineyard and Fenway Park. Children's Summer trips include Canobie Lake Park, 
Miniature Golf, Wingaersheek Beach and Water Country. 

Special Events 

DCS coordinates special events throughout the year which have become memorable 
family favorites. These programs are offered at minimal cost to residents and include a Spring 
Egg Hunt, Spring and Fall Town Yard Sales, a free Summer Concert Series, Preschool Park 
Events, the Father/Daughter Holly Ball and North Pole Calling. 

Sports Leagues 

Preschool leagues include Fall and Spring Kickin' Kids Soccer, Spring Sandlot T-Ball, 
and Winter Lil' Hoopsters Basketball. Over 500 pre-school age children participated in these 
leagues this past year. 

Elementary and middle school children participate in youth basketball, the Bob French 
League and girls 7 & 8 grade travel basketball in the Winter. In the Spring, a Lacrosse league for 
ages 5-8 is offered. Over 600 elementary and middle school children participated in these 
programs this past year. 

Adult Co-ed Softball Leagues are organized through DCS. Andover residents and 
business employees have the opportunity to join one of the 24 teams in the Summer and 12 
teams in the Fall. Approximately 900 adults participate in this league each year. 

Arts Programs 

DCS art programs are offered throughout the year for all ages. Children's programs 
feature opportunities in theater arts with Jubilee, Children's Studio for the Arts and Summer 
Theater Ensemble. Additionally, there is a host of art, dance and music lessons for both children 
and adults. 



75 



Summer Program 

DCS offers a variety of exciting programs to keep the children of Andover engaged 
during their Summer vacation. Listed below are just a few of the many programs offered: 

• Drop-In Playground - Held at Rec Park and Pomps Pond, is available to children 
entering grades 1-6. It offers seven weeks of age-appropriate activities such as 
swimming, sports and arts & crafts. 

■ All Day Discovery - Held at South School, Rec Park and Pomps Pond is a full day, 
seven- week program for children entering grades K - 6. They participate in tennis, 
swimming, boating, arts & crafts and a weekly field trip. 

Sports Programs include Warrior Tennis, Warrior Football, Warrior Baseball, 
Warrior Soccer, Beach Volleyball, Track, Fencing and Golf. 

Programs for Younger Children include Beach Buddies and Swim Lessons held at 
Pomps Pond and various sports programs including Gymnastics, Cheerleading, Pee- 
Wee Tennis and Kid's Sports held at various locations throughout the Town. 

RECREATION FACILITIES 

Recreation Park 

This large scenic park off Abbot Street is open to the public for a wide variety of seasonal 
recreational activities. Facilities include four lighted tennis courts, a ball field with lights for 
night games, lighted in-line skate rink, picnic areas, children's play area, a sledding hill and 
restrooms. Whether you're looking to host a relaxing family picnic or an action packed birthday 
party, Recreation Park is the perfect place for your event. 

Pomps Pond 

Located off Abbot Street, Pomps Pond offers a spacious beach area, picnic grounds, 
children's playground area, canoeing and kayaking rentals, sailing and recreational and 
instructional swimming. The complex, open mid-June through mid-August, includes a 
bathhouse with showers, restrooms, changing facilities, concession stand and first aid station. 
Andover residents may purchase beach stickers at the pond. Non-residents are charged the daily 
rate. Over 350 residents purchased stickers in 2011. Typically 150 people per day enjoy the 
Pond. An Early Bird discounted rate for season stickers is offered each spring. Mark your 
calendars to stop by the DCS office to purchase yours, and you too can enjoy this natural beauty. 



76 



DCS STATISTICS 



Total DCS Revenues - FY11 
$964,226 



$206,753 

21% 




□ Fall Programs 

M Winter/Spring Programs 

□ Summer Programs 
II Pomps Pond 



$486,879 
51% 



$220,731 

23% 



DCS REVOLVING FUND 
REVENUES & EXPENDITURES 



$550,000 
$500,000 
$450,000 
$400,000 
$350,000 
$300,000 
$250,000 
$200,000 
$150,000 
$100,000 
$50,000 
$0 



& 



f f 



& 



s# 



A*" A* V A** A* A A** A** A**° s£> 
X^ X^ x^ x^ x^ x^ x^ x^ 



D Revenues 



O Expenditures 



77 



DIVISION OF ELDER SERVICES 

The mission of the Division of Elder Services is to identify, develop, implement and 
advocate for programs and services designed to enhance the quality of life and independence of 
elders in the community, and to provide a focal point in the community (Senior Center) where 
these programs and services can be easily accessed by elders and their families. 

The Growing Community of Residents of "Senior" Status 

As the number of Andover residents presently or soon to be 60+ steadily increases, Elder 
Services faces the challenge of identifying resources for an increasingly diverse elder population 
and asks: How prepared are we to meet the various needs of a population whose ages range from 
60 to 1 00+? What resources will be needed to support our oldest seniors living independently in 
the community? Will we, as a community, be ready as more residents seek assistance, either for 
themselves or for family members? They continue to create and provide specialized programs 
and services in fulfillment of its mission as laid out by the Council on Aging following the 
charge of the March 12, 1966 Town Meeting: 

Identify the total needs of the community's elderly population; 

Educate the community and enlist support and participation of all citizens about these 

needs; 

Design, promote or implement services to fill these needs or coordinate existing services 

in the community; 

Promote and support any other programs which are designed to assist the elderly in our 

community; and 

Enlist and develop capable volunteers and professional leadership for the purposes stated 

in this Article (#35). 

To accomplish these goals, programs are designed to promote good health and nutrition, 
access to services and community life, financial and personal independence, combat isolation as 
well as creative Intergenerational programs serving both seniors and young people from pre- 
school to college age. An emphasis on Health, Wellness & Nutrition programs provides a variety 
of opportunities to maintain, enhance and improve health. Continuing goals and objectives focus 
on improving social services, transportation, educational and recreational programs, 
intergenerational and volunteer opportunities and expanding community outreach. 

Challenges 

According to the 2010 Census, 6,447 Andover residents are over the age of 60 - an 
increase of 28% over the 2000 Census count of 5,045 (The State average increase is 16%). One 
in six residents are over 60 - one in three are over 50. Those who are over 85 as well as those 
who have recently or will soon attain "senior status" are the fastest growing groups. 

Increased costs and decreased funding is compounded by an increased need for services. 
As staff struggles to maintain core services with fewer resources, they have increased efforts to 
off-set related costs. Advocacy, grant writing and outside fundraising are increasingly important. 
Elder Services is especially grateful to the 'The Friends of the Andover Senior Center' for their 
support, however, their dissolution on December 3 1 st has had a tremendous financial impact. 

78 



Fees for services cover most program costs and are supplemented by coordinating 
programs with other agencies. Programs developed cooperatively with the Andover/North 
Andover YMCA, Elder Services of the Merrimack Valley and other community organizations 
provide access to a variety of programs and services that would otherwise be limited by both 
space and economic constraints. 

Increased Need 

Requests for services tend to increase in difficult economic times. Direct services, 
including Medical Transportation and Meals on Wheels, have seen increases. There has also 
been a dramatic increase in requests for general information from both seniors themselves and 
their family members. Staff has expanded its outreach efforts to provide information on a variety 
of resources. The need for supportive services provided by the Geriatric Nurse Specialist to meet 
increased mental health needs of the elder population continues to increase. Those aged 85+ are 
the fastest growing group receiving services. It is expected that these trends will continue as 
people continue to live longer and remain in the community rather than seeking long-term care. 
Cutbacks in funding and services at the Federal and State levels and the negative effects of the 
economy continue to impact the elderly population first and often most severely. 

Accomplishments 

Presenting a different image to the community other than whatever stereotype "Senior 
Center" creates has been of particular importance given the dramatic and projected increase in 
the population age 60+. In an effort to re-shape the Senior Center's image, staff is redesigning 
the Senior Center web page, creating a logo and is in the process of changing its name using 
ASC instead of the Andover Senior Center in conjunction with the phrase "Andover Celebrates 
Experience". 

The TRIAD Council held several forums during the year including "Emergency 
Preparedness". They handed out "Grab & Go" bags as well as a "Senior Safety Day" and photo 
ID's. "Sexting and Cyberbullying" was presented to help grandparents better understand issues 
affecting their grandchildren as participants in social networks. They also worked to promote the 
Andover Police Department's drug collection for the safe disposal of expired and unused 
medications. A "Teens Today" forum was held to increase awareness of the home medicine 
cabinet as a primary source for medications and the misuse of prescription drugs by teens. 

The Council on Aging developed their five-year plan focusing on: 

■ Outreach - building a positive profile, community involvement and housing options 

■ Physical Space - maximize the efficiency and use of ASC, parking and partnerships 

■ Services - explore areas for expansion, transportation, volunteers and "whole person" 
model 

Volunteer services continue to grow with over 300 volunteers providing services in all 
Town and School Departments through the "SCRPT" Program, a senior tax work off program. 
The value of their services to the Town is over $800,000. 



79 



ELDER SERVICES STATISTICS 



ELDER SERVICES REVOLVING FUND 
REVENUES & EXPENDITURES 



$160,000 



$140,000 
$120,000 
$100,000 

$80,000 

$60,000 

$40,000 -flrp 

$20,000 
$0 



fS - 









A^ A* A** A^ A^ A^ A# A^ A^ A^ 

X X X X X X X X X X 



D Revenue 



D Expenditure 



$550,000 
$500,000 
$450,000 
$400,000 
$350,000 
$300,000 
$250,000 
$200,000 



VALUE OF ELDER SERVICES 
VOLUNTEER SERVICE 



$494,019 



$391,045 



$474,780 



$474,541 y 



* $439,600 $4^27 



^$427,916 



$368,498 . 



$347,910 



$362,505 



CN^ ,CV> 



V -vN v 



JO JO JO JO JO jv>- JO" jo- J> j- 

X* X* X* X* ^^ X* X ^^ X* X 



J 



$425,000 
$400,000 
$375,000 
$350,000 
$325,000 
$300,000 
$275,000 
$250,000 
$225,000 
$200,000 
$175,000 
$150,000 
$125,000 
$100,000 



TAX VOUCHER PROGRAM 
VALUE TO TOWN 




A^ A# A^ A^ A* A^ A^ A^ A^ A*> 

X X X X* X X^ X X* X X 



35,000 
30,000 
25,000 
20,000 
15,000 
10,000 
5,000 




SENIOR MEALS SERVED 



_ _ 



<$> ^ ^ £ £ £ A* % ^ ^ £> 



□ On-Site Lunches H Meals-on-Wheels 



80 



DIVISION OF YOUTH SERVICES 

Andover Youth Services (AYS) aims to provide young people useful experiences to 
promote healthy growth and development. It is our goal to build a network of affordable, 
accessible, safe, and challenging youth programs that appeal and respond to the diverse 
interests of young adolescents and their families. 



The Andover Youth Services (AYS) vision for a better community begins with the 
education and empowerment of youth. With this in mind, AYS provides Andover youth and 
families with programs that focus on: personal, social, cognitive and creative competence, 
vocational awareness, health and physical well-being, leadership and service and the 
development of social skills. AYS receives ideas and concepts directly from the young people 
and then empowers them to make them happen. By interacting alongside young people, whether 
it is handing out fliers or creating plans for a new Skate Park, the programs that AYS creates and 
implements are immediate reflections of what the youth want and need. 

Additionally, AYS continues to be an advocate for youth development in the community 
and a bridge between youth and the network of support services. Andover' s young people face 
many challenges. The mission of AYS is to develop and maintain a program that has the ability 
to be flexible and encourage all youth to use their creativity, spontaneity and energy in positive 
ways. 

Andover Youth Services has the most successful recreational, educational, social and 
support program for the 11-18 year old age group in Andover and adjacent communities. The 
AYS staff is at the forefront of youth development programming which is evident by many 
programs in neighboring towns that try to imitate the success of the AYS program. 

Prominent accomplishments in 201 1 include: 

■ A proposal granting $2 million towards the construction of a Youth Center was passed by 

overwhelming numbers at the Special Town Meeting in December. 

■ The AYS Green Team completed several municipal projects for the Plant and Facilities 

Department saving thousands of taxpayer dollars to complete these unbudgeted projects. 

■ AYS secured a donation of a $75,000 half pipe for the Andover Community Skate Park 

and then removed, transported and reassembled it at the park. 

These examples exemplify the resourcefulness of the AYS staff, the ability to work 
constructively with all Town departments and the ongoing effort to provide the best services to 
the citizens of Andover. 



81 



AYS STATISTICS 



YOUTH SERVICES REVOLVING FUND 
REVENUES & EXPENDITURES 



$360,000 

$320,000 

$280,000 

$240,000 

$200,000 

$160,000 

$120,000 

$80,000 

$40,000 

$0 






O 



□ Revenues 



D Expenditures 



82 



VETERANS SERVICES 

The mission of the Veterans Services Office is to do whatever is necessary to provide 
Andover veterans with benefits, entitlements and services whether they be medical, administrative, 
financial or quality of life. 



The Veterans Services Office provides or coordinates all State and Federal financial, medical 
and administrative benefits to Andover' s 3,000 veterans and their families. 

State Benefits - In 201 1 the Office responded to numerous Public Assistance requests from 
veterans for fuel, food, housing, burials medical needs and other under Massachusetts General Law 
Chapter 115 (M.G.L. CI 15). The numerous requests for Public Assistance are due to the current 
economic conditions and aging veteran population. The Public Assistance program is paid for by the 
Town and reimbursed 75% by the State under M.G.L. CI 15. Veterans' Public Assistance increased 
in F Y-20 1 1 . The Veterans Office managed re-occurring Public Assistance Cases, for veterans and/or 
their families, throughout the year; culminating in over $94,000 disbursed to veterans and their 
dependents. 

Federal Benefits - Obtaining Federal Benefits for local veterans is a priority in the office to 
include service connected disability claim processing. Andover residents receive over $2 million 
dollars in tax-free Federal veterans' benefit dollars annually - mostly through service connected 
disabilities and widows' pensions. 

The Office also planned and coordinated the patriotic ceremonies in observance of Veterans 
Day, Memorial Day, Flag Day, September 1 1 th and placed flags on the graves of veterans buried in 
Andover. Band concerts and other civic activities during the year were also handled by the Veterans 
Services Office. 

Highlights of 201 1 include dedicating the 9/1 1 Plague on September 1 1 th which will forever 
memorialize the names of four Andover residents killed on 9/1 1 . The on-going project to document 
our veterans' history continued with the publishing "Heroes Among Us - Book 3", a book spot- 
lighting our living WWII Veterans who served in the Pacific Theater. Additionally, the office was 
active in the local coordination of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts Afghanistan/Iraq "Welcome 
Home Bonus Program" which pays service members deployed to combat zones a $ 1 ,000 bonus and 
those called to active duty outside combat zones $500. A focus for the Veterans' Service Director 
was to continuously improve the Veterans' Office record keeping and update where possible. As 
such, there is on-going project comparing Andover Revolutionary War records to the existing 
Veterans Office Records. 

Fifty-nine Andover veterans died during 2011. These veterans served from WWII through the 
Vietnam War. Several of these veterans fought in more than one war. The Director of Veterans 
Services also serves as the Town's Graves Registration and Burial Officer. 



83 



KEY SERVICES 

State Veteran Public Assistance Benefits (Massachusetts General Law C115 / MGL C115) 

Outreach, Intake and Counseling, Public Assistance Disbursements and Semi-Annual Audits 

Federal Veteran Benefits (Veterans Administration / VA) 

Disability Claim Processing, Elderly Aid and Attendance, Health Care, Burial and Widow's Pension 
Processing and Grave Marker Applications 

Graves Registration 

Veteran Funerals, Family Burial Counseling, Necrologies and Records Management for over 7,000 
Veterans (living and deceased) 

Committees and Coordination 

Patriotic Holiday Committee, Elder Services, Red Cross Armed Services Committee, and local 
Veterans' Groups (The American Legion and Disabled American Veterans) 

Patriotic Programs and Ceremonies 

Memorial Day, Veterans Day, Patriotic Concerts, September 1 1 th Remembrance, Annual Veterans' 
Luncheon and other 

Memorial Care 

Monument oversight, dedication as needed and Veterans' Grave flags (10 cemeteries and over 3,600 
veteran graves) 



84 



ANDOVER VETERANS DEATHS 



Name 

Anderson, William D. 
Bawkum, Robert E. 
Becker, Henry C. 
Blackwell, Edward G. 
Blake, Samuel 
Blinn, Paul F. 
Brainerd, Frederick D. 
Caldwell, James Jr. 
Clukey, Richard W. 
Collins, William C. 
Cotton, Martin 
Dane, Donald J. 
Dargoonian, Benjamin 
Eckman, Alfred B. 
Faigel, Harold M. 
Finn, John J. 
Fitzpatrick, George F. Jr. 
Forster, Raymond R. 
Froburg, Frederic A. 
Gray, William Jr. 
Grecoe, John H. Jr. 
Gurry, Edward E. 
Henderson, Ernest J. 
Holland, Robert C. 
Kendall, Phillip E. 



Branch 


Service Era 


Coast Guard 


WWII 


Navy 


WWII & Korea 


Navy 


WWII & Korea 


Navy 


Korea 


Army & Air Force 


WWI & Korea 


Army Air Force 


WWII 


Army Air Force 


WWII 


Army 


WWII 


Army 


WWII 


Navy 


WWII 


Air Force 


Vietnam 


Army 


WWII 


Army 


WWII 


Army 


WWII 


Air Force 


Vietnam 


Navy 


WWII & Korea 


Army 


Vietnam 


Army 


Korea 


Navy 


Vietnam 


Marine Corps 


Vietnam 


Navy 


Korea 


Navy 


WWII 


Navy 


Korea 


Navy 


WWII 


Air Force 


Korea 



85 



Name 

LaRochelle, Raymond E. 
Little. Harold 
Lyons. John F. 
MacMillan, James A. 
Manning. John F. 
Mascott, Frederick H. 
Melia, Martin J. 
Morrissey. Edward J. 
Muise, Myron H. 
Redfern, Robert D. 
Retelle, James F. 
Romano. Fhomas 
Sanft. Sidney 
Scuito. Stephen R. 
Seacole. Martin A. 
Serley, Frederick R. 
Sheehan. Edward M. Jr. 
Squibb. Irwin M. 
Sullivan. Robert A. 
Swain, Franklin P. 
Teichert. Frederick E. 
Tetreault, Joseph G. 
Thomson, Alexander Jr. 
Townsend, William F. 
Trott, James E. 
Tsepas, Thomas E. 



Branch 


Service Era 


Navy 


Vietnam 


Army 


WWH & Korea 


Air Force 


Korea 


Navy 


WWII & Korea 


Navy 


Korea 


Marine Corps 


Korea 


Arm\' 


Vietnam 


Navy 


wwn 


Arm}- 


Korea 


Navy 


Vietnam 


Army Air Force 


WWII 


Army 


wwn 


Army 


wwn 


Navy 


wwn 


Marine Corps 


Vietnam 


Army 


Korea 


Air Force 


Korea 


Army 


wwn 


Army 


wwn 


Army 


Korea 


Navy 


wwn 


Army 


wwn 


Navy 


Vietnam 


Navy 


Korea 


Army Air Force 


wwn 


Army 


Vietnam 



86 



Name 

Turgiss, Wallace E. 
Twigg, Robert H. 
White, James 
White, Robert B. 
Wobesky, Norman A. 
Wood, Peter T. 
Zollner, Robert S. 



Branch 


Service Era 


Army Air Force & Air Force WWII & K( 


Air Force 


Vietnam 


Navy 


WWII 


Army 


Vietnam 


Army 


WWII 


Navy 


WWII 


Army Air Force 


WWII 



87 



Annual Report 2012 
Andover Public Schools 

"Every Child, Every Day, Every Way" 

Mission 

The mission of the Andover Public Schools, in partnership with the entire Andover community, 
is to educate by engaging and inspiring, students to develop as self-reliant, responsible citizens 
who are thinkers, problem solvers, and contributors prepared to participate in an evolving global 
society. 

Core Values 

High Achievement for All * Teaching Excellence * Innovation * Respect * Responsibility 



I am pleased to present 2011-2012 Annual Report for the Andover Public Schools. As you read 
the annual school report, you will note that the strength of our school district is in the quality of 
our students, teachers, support staff, school leaders, parents, and our community. 

Operations 

The Andover Public Schools consists of six elementary schools, three middle schools and a high 
school. In addition, the Andover Public Schools is a member of the Greater Lawrence Education 
Collaborative (GLEC) for special education and the Town of Andover is one of the founding 
members of the Greater Lawrence Regional Vocational Technical School. The day-to-day 
operation of the Andover Public Schools is under the leadership and supervision of the 
Superintendent, Dr. Marinel D. McGrath. The Andover School Committee consists of five (5) 
members, each elected in a non-partisan ballot by the people of Andover for terms of three (3) 
years. Members of the school committee and their terms of office are: Ann W. Gilbert, 
Chairperson, 2012; Paula Colby-Clements, Vice Chairperson, 2013; David Birnbach, 2012; 
Richard Collins, 2013; and Dennis Forgue, 2014. 

The goal of the Andover Public Schools is to provide an engaging and balanced education that 
challenges all students through our focus on high expectations, academic achievement, and 
education of the whole child which we believe is the shared responsibility of the family, the 
school district, and the community. The curriculum of the schools has been designed to align 
with the state frameworks and the development of globally-engaged learners. The school district 
goal is to provide engaging and comprehensive curricula that challenges all students, raises their 
achievement level, and enables them to meet or exceed Andover, the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts and international learning standards by fusing the "3Rs and 4Cs" (critical 
thinking/problem solving, communication, collaboration, and creativity/innovation). 

The 2011-2012 enrollment for the Andover Public Schools (APS) totaled 6,206 students with 
2,909 students in our six elementary schools grades pre-kindergarten through grade five, 1,510 
students in the three middle schools grades six through eight, and 1,787 students in the high 
school grades nine through twelve. 



88 



Andover Public Schools - By the Numbers - Selected Statistical Information 

October 1,2010 Enrollment 6,178 

October 1,2011 Enrollment 6,206 



AHS Graduation Rate - Class of 201 1 (Source: MA DESE) 



Post-Secondary Education - 


2011 


95.4% Continuing Education 


4- Year College 




88.5% 


2- Year College 




4.2% 


Post Graduate 




2.7% 


Dropout rate 




1.1% 


- GED 




0.9% 


% still in school 




2.2% 


% non-grad completers 




0.4% 


SAT Scores: Class of 20 11 






SAT by Mean 




1919 out of 2400 


SA T by Subject Area 






Critical Reading 




625 


Mathematics 




666 


Writing 




628 


Advanced Placement - Class of 201 1 




426 Student and 766 Exams 


- Average score 


3.5 out of 5.0 


AP Scholars 




117 


National Merit Scholarship ) 


Program 




Class of 20 12 




4 Semi-Finalists; 17 Commei 



2011-2012 Highlights 

Recognitions - Andover High School 

■ National Intel School of Distinction in Mathematics. 

■ AP® District Honor Roll for Significant Gains in Advanced Placement® Access and Student 
Performance. 

■ Mass Recycle' s 201 1 GOLD Award for their outstanding efforts to increase recycling and 
eliminating waste. 

Curriculum and Instruction 

■ Of special note is the High School faculty's work in curriculum development and their 
preparations for work on the New England Association of Secondary Schools and Colleges 
(NEASC) self-study year. 

■ Recognition of Andover High School as Continuation of AHS Senior Exhibition - a selective, 
independent, academic project in which students must submit proposals, engage in a rigorous 



89 



investigation of the topic, create an original product, and defend their work before a faculty 
panel. 

■ Began the alignment of the Andover math curriculum to the National Common Core Standards 

■ Continued to address educational equity and access issues with a focus on the growing English 
Language Learners' population to ensure we are serving all populations well. 

■ Adopted and implemented a new reading program, Wilson Fundations Program for students in 
K-3 which is based on scientific research and aligned to the Massachusetts Curriculum 
Frameworks. The program supplements our current programming in the areas of phonics, 
spelling, penmanship and writing. K-3 teachers participated in a staff development program 
relative to program implementation during the early release days. 

■ Increased in-school tutorial opportunities for those students in need of intervention. 

■ Appointed a K-12 mathematics program advisor, Katherine Richard, to work with teachers to 
improve teaching practices. 

■ Implemented the revised K-5 wellness curriculum/program. 

■ Wood Hill Middle School 8 grade engineering class students designed a prosthetic arm for a 
12 year old girl in Afghanistan which was able to perform fine and gross motor skills. 
Students followed the Engineering Design Process to solve the problem and were put into 
groups of 4-5 students with one being the Project Manager. They developed a disability 
awareness activity, cross cultural comparison activity, and made a presentation on artificial 
limb presentation. 

New Program Initiatives and Planning 

■ Completed the APS Strategic Plan which was approved by the School Committee on 
November 17, 2011. 

■ Implemented five (5) iPad pilots in grades K-12 to infuse technology and 21 st century skills 
into classrooms to ensure we are effectively engaging our digital learners. 

Extracurricular Activities and Athletics 

■ Andover High School offers over 40 clubs and co-curricular activities such as Mock Trial, 
Project teamwork, Students Against Destructive Behavior, Drama Guild and Show Choir. An 
active National Honor Society provides after school tutoring and organizes an annual scholarship 
benefit. 

■ Art, music, and drama students continue to distinguish themselves. Several Andover students 
won Boston Globe Key Awards in art, MA Drama Guild One-Act Festival ensemble and 
individual awards at the New England One-Act Festival, and students were selected to 
represent Andover at District and All-State Band and Chorus. 



90 



■ Sixty percent (60%) of AHS students participate in the athletic program, which offers thirty- 
three (33) sports. Fifteen hundred (1500) roster spots were filled by student-athletes who took 
advantage of the opportunities for learning through the athletic program during the school 
year. Andover had an outstanding 201 1 athletic season. The Boys Outdoor Track team 
earned the All State Championship in 201 1 . The following teams earned Division I State 
Championships: Girls Basketball (3 r consecutive title), Boys Skiing, Field Hockey and Girls 
Swimming and Diving (10 l consecutive title). The following teams earned Merrimack 
Valley Conference Championships in 201 1: Girls' Basketball, Girls' Skiing, Girls' Indoor 
Track, Boys' Tennis, Girls' Tennis, Girls' Lacrosse, Girls' Outdoor Track, Girls' Cross 
Country, Girls' Swimming and Diving, Field Hockey, and Girls' Soccer. Overall, the 
athletic teams won 1 Merrimack Valley Conference titles and one North Shore League title 
out of the 33 AHS varsity sports. 

Personnel 

■ Bid farewell to APS faculty and staff who retired from dedicated service in June 201 1 
James Batchelder (AHS), Patricia Gleason (West El), Arthur Iworsley (West El), 
Katherine Iworsley (High Plain), Peggy Cain (AHS), Anna Sullivan (AHS) David Gangi 
(AHS), Donna Pappalardo (AHS) Clarissa McDermott (West El) Evelyn Wroebel (West 
El), Theresa Palardy (Doherty Middle), William Kolbe (AHS), Rosemary Webb (Sanborn), 
Paul Ragnio (AHS), Illeana Kleponis (AHS), Anna Levinson (West Middle), Susan Curtis 
(West Middle), Mary Ellen Dahlstrand (High Plain), Sue Cullen (Instructional Assistant - 
AHS) and Diana Davison (Crossing Guard). 

■ Welcomed Nancy A. Duclos, Assistant Superintendent for Curriculum and Instruction; Paul 
P. Szymanski, Assistant Superintendent for Finance and Administration; Joyce Laundre, 
Director of Student Services; and Paul Puzzanghera, Chief Information Officer (CIO) for the 
Schools and Town. 

Professional Development 

■ Began partnership with Merrimack College with the institution of the Fellowship Program, 
an initiative that places, graduates students in one year teaching internships in the schools. 

■ Dedicated the six (6) early release days at the elementary level to staff development in the 
areas of reading, writing, and mathematics and at the middle school level to staff 
development in the area of project-based learning in the context of middle school philosophy. 

■ Continued third year implementation of the "Teaching for Understanding" framework by the 
Project Zero from Harvard University based upon the teachings of Dr. David Perkins and Dr. 
Howard Gardner at West Middle School. Teachers use common planning time to design 
interdisciplinary studies that not only engage students but also connect to students' lives to 
provide deeper, longer-lasting and more meaningful understanding of essential concepts and 
skills. Faculty shared their units with colleagues during faculty and department meetings. 

■ Began training program for special education teachers and a subject area teachers on the 
essential components of co-teaching and will be demonstrating strategies to the rest of the 
West Middle School faculty in the upcoming year. 



91 



■ Doherty Middle School English Language Arts and special education staff worked with a 
reading and educational diagnostician to incorporate language-based strategies across 
curriculum and grade levels, Twelve (12) members of the staff visited other schools to 
observe classes and investigate alternate middle school schedules. 

■ Hosted a 2 Vz day institute for middle school teachers focused on building a repertoire of 
assessment methods that teachers can use in the classroom as evidence of student learning. 
Examined the difference between formative and summative assessments, including 
traditional and authentic, project-based methods; created learning targets that focus on 
essential skills and knowledge that students need; and began to develop assessments and 
rubrics to match those targets. 

Community Service 

■ Students at each school support several local charities and participate in community services 
activities. Examples include, but are not limited to: a coat drive sponsored by Anton's 
cleaners, food donations to Merrimack Valley food pantries, Neighbors in Need (food), Holy 
Family Hospital (pajamas), Leahy School in Lawrence (books), Lazarus House (food), 
Japanese tsunami relief, Guatemala (children's toys), Coats for Kids, Turkey s4 America, 
Sanborn School's Harvest Festival deliveries to Andover senior citizens, Jump Rope for 
Heart, and a support to schools in western Massachusetts that were damaged in the June 201 1 
tornadoes, and the Jimmy Fund fight against childhood cancer. 

■ The Jimmy Fund drive, which was dubbed Sox-cessful became an Andover community 
event. Together the three middle schools raised over $20,000. Perhaps what was most 
special about this event was that our students respectfully declined an offer to have a 
member of the Red Sox team visit stating that meeting a member of the Red Sox was not 
why they engaged in the program. 

Human Resources 

■ Continues to explore ways to replace high cost services with less traditional, but equally 
effective tools. For example, recruitment advertising through newspapers, particularly the 
Boston Globe, is expensive and while it cannot be eliminated altogether, there have been 
substantial efforts made to develop alternative ways to develop applicant pools. Our 
emphasis has shifted substantially to recruiting through professional list serves, targeted 
recruitment fairs such as the Merrimack Valley School Educator's Consortium Teacher 
Recruitment Fair (held this year at Merrimack College) and the Massachusetts Partnership 
for Diversity in Education Recruitment Fair. 

■ Supported the "Today's Students: Tomorrow's Teachers" initiative to recruit, mentor and 
train culturally diverse and economically challenged students from Andover High School 
from high school through college and place them as teachers and leaders in their 
communities. 



92 






Plant and Facilities 

■ The New Bancroft School Design Development and Construction Documents Phases were 
completed. The CM at Risk firm was selected; the Final Design review and selection of the 
OPM are in process. 

■ Converted 1 AHS classroom HV AC controls to direct digital with ventilation demand 
control. 

■ Installed demand controlled ventilation in AHS Field House and Dunn Gym which will result 
in additional energy savings. 

■ Installed perimeter security system and replaced deteriorated concrete stairs at the Collins 
Center. 

■ Replaced the second of two boilers at Sanborn School. 

■ Installed new ADA compliant playground at South School. 

■ Reoriented West Middle School chairlift to accommodate student's particular needs. 

■ Replaced West Middle School roof, gymnasium windows, and masonry re-pointing through 
the MSBA Green Repair Grant Program. 

■ Selected Pare Corporation to perform a Site Master Plan of all school sites except Bancroft 
and Shawsheen Schools. Items to be addressed include ADA compliance, lighting, drainage, 
site circulation, parking, muster areas, etc. This multi-year plan will result in a school site 
being reconstructed yearly. 

A look ahead to FY 13. . . 

The Andover Public Schools will develop a comprehensive Staff Evaluation Plan for 
implementation in September 2013 in response to the new regulations that were approved by 
the MA Department of Elementary and Secondary Education in June 201 1. 

The School Committee will negotiate the new Educator Evaluation Regulations with the 
Andover Education Association. 

Begin training of school-based data teams to improve instruction and to compile consistent 
assessment information on student growth. 

Begin implementation of intervention strategies for general education students who are 
struggling academically and/or behaviorally. 

Creation and training of school-based data teams in an effort to improve instruction and to tie 
assessment information to intervention information. 



■ 



93 



-^.::::~y.:::\ :: ire'ess :^frii:r^:7_re ::: z_'_ sch: :.s r.i :e^;.:e: 5:.i:::r-5 :: surrcr: cur 
l;z\:~-~- :.i5f:::::: ::u::i::" e 



Closing 
No rercr: of this kind would be complete without taking the opportunity to thank the many 
people who have been so thoroughly supportive of our schools this past year. On behalf of the 
students., faculty", ad m inistration, and School Committee. I thank the PACs and PTOs. the 
Andover Coalition for Education (ACE), the Andover Fund for Education (AFE). the Andover 
Rotary Club, the Andover Service Club., the athletic and extracurricular booster clubs, the 
Andona Society, and the many generous parents and residents who have given of their time and 
money to support our schools. 

I am also grateful to our faculty", staff, principals, assistant principals, and the District Leadership 
team for their devotion to the children and youth of Andover. Finally, we are most appreciative 
to the townspeople of Andover, the Andover Board of Selectmen and Finance Committee who 
have see" as through difficult times and who continue to support our efforts to make the 
Andover Public Schools the very best they can be. Thank you! 

In closing, our initiatives continue to advance the coherence and quality of our educational 
program. There are many goals yet to realize. Our professional staff must have the resources if 
we are to continue to be competitive with similar school districts in mamtaining. developing, and 
sustaining a high quality educational program for all of our students in the Andover Public 
Schools. 

Respec~.il>.' subrruuei. 



5urerJi:e~deu: ::S::.:z.s 



94 



GREATER LAWRENCE TECHNICAL SCHOOL 



The Greater Lawrence Technical School is a regional vocational secondary institution 
with a campus in West Andover encompassing twenty-six acres. The school educates students 
from Andover. Lawrence. Methuen and North .Andover and. in addition, accepts qualified 
students from other communities through the School Choice Program. There are currently 
twenty-two underclassmen from Andover attending the school and fifteen employees of Greater 
Lawrence Tech reside in Andover. 

GLTS is accredited by the New England .Association of Schools and Colleges. In 2011. 
sixty-five percent of the senior class went on to continue their education in either a four or two 
year college following graduation while the remaining students combined either college with 
full-time employment or made a direct impact on the workforce of the Merrimack Valley. 
College-bound graduates increased twenty-four percent versus the graduating class of 2007 
(41%). 

Greater Lawrence Technical School continues to adapt the career areas to meet the ever- 
changing needs of the twenty-first century labor market. The eighteen career opportunities 
offered to students through a three-academy model include Automotive Collision Repair. 
Automotive Technology. Barbering, Biotechnology. Carpentry. Cosmetology. Culinary .Arts. 
Dental Assisting. Electricity; Electronics & Pre-Engineering. Graphic Communications. Health 
Careers. HVAC, Information Technology.. Marketing. Metal Fabrication & Joining 
Technologies. Office Technology and Plumbing. Our school has been one of the pioneers in the 
state regarding a successful academy model. 

GLTS prepares students for lifetime employment through nationally and state recognized 
licensure and certification programs including: Building Supervisors License, Board certified 
Cosmetology. NATEF, ASE. Refrigerant Recover}" and Recycling License. SP2. Mass IM 
Certification and License, .American Culinary Federation License, ServSafe™. State Board of 
Electricians, OSHA Safely Certification, Print Ed Certification. Art Collaborative, Graphic Arts 
Education and Research Foundation, CPR. First .Aid. CNA. EKG Technician License, Home 
Health Aide. NCC.AP, Paid Feeders Program. A- Cat.5. Cisco, Hilti CertificatiorL State Board 
of Plumbing. Water Pex & Trac Piping Certification, and Gastite Certification. The Cooperative 
Education component of Greater Lawrence Technical School allows students to use their 
knowledge and skills at worksites in the Merrimack Valley which include many employers in 
Andover. 

While the school continues to be a community of learners dedicated to service and 
excellence. Greater Lawrence Technical School maintains its mantra "Demand More, Expect 
More, Achieve More'*. This has been reflected in the improvement in MCAS scores, the 
phenomenal success of the athletic teams and the continued medal winning prowess of both 
DECA and SKILLS USA on the State and National level. 

Residents of Andover have benefitted from many of the consumer friendly services 
offered to the public through our technical programs. At Greater LawTence Technical School. 



95 



residents have had their cars repaired, received a haircut or manicure, enjoyed lunch in one of 
our two restaurants, had brochures printed, and countless other services which have made life 
easier for townspeople each day. In addition, the residents of Andover continue to use the school 
facility by way of enrollment in classes offered through Community and Youth Services and 
athletic venues for both youth and varsity sports teams, which include the swimming pool, 
gymnasiums and fields. Greater Lawrence Technical School continues to be the site for most 
Andover teens receiving their Lifeguarding and Water Safety certifications. More than sixty 
Andover groups and individuals have utilized the rental option created by The District 
Committee. 

Greater Lawrence Technical School continues to offer Adult Education to the Greater 
Lawrence community, which began in September 2009. Classes offered include Computer 
Applications, GED, Spanish, English, Trade and Technical, Fitness, CPR, ServSafe™, Cooking 
and Crafts. We are currently offering 55 classes, and are planning to add a Culinary Training 
Program and Cosmetology Program in 2012. We are partnering with Gould Construction 
Institute in offering professional development for Electrical and Sheet Metal areas. We have 
also partnered with Andover Community Services to offer cooking classes to the community 
here at Greater Lawrence Technical School. 

GLTS enjoys a close working relationship with the Andover Police Department. Since 
the 2007 - 2008 School Year, an Andover patrolman has been employed by the District as a 
School Resource Officer. The officer's presence during the school day, and at after-school and 
sporting events, has had a positive impact on the entire school community. 

The Greater Lawrence Technical School District Committee is made up of seven 
members from the four sending communities of Andover, Lawrence, Methuen and North 
Andover. In addition to representation on the District Committee, Andover is also represented 
by a resident on both the school's Advisory Board and The School Council. District Committee 
representation is determined by the number of students attending from that community. A listing 
of the Committee members and the city/town they represent can be found in this document's 
Directory of Committees and Boards. 



96 



ANDOVER HOUSING AUTHORITY 



The Andover Housing Authority was organized in June 1948. Monthly meetings are held 
on the third Thursday of every month at the Stowe Court Community Room, 1 00 Morton Street, 
except during the months of January, May and October when meetings are held at the Frye 
Circle Community Room at 256 North Main Street. Board Members and the Executive Director 
are as follows: 

James Cuticchia - Chairman Calvin Deyermond - Vice Chairman 

Francis O'Connor - Treasurer Daniel T. Grams - Assistant Treasurer 

Janice Burkholder - Member Christine Poschen-Metzemaekers - Ex. Director 

The Andover Housing Authority has 33 buildings of State-aided housing for 
senior/disabled people comprised of 218 units on six different sites - Chestnut Court, Grandview 
Terrace, Frye Circle and Stowe Court. There are 56 units of family housing located on Memorial 
Circle. In addition, the AHA owns one house under the Mass. Chapter 689 Program for 
developmentally disabled adults and administers three Alternative Housing Vouchers under the 
Massachusetts (AHVP) Leased Housing Program for a total of 285 State units. 

State-funded Programs - Income Limits are as follows: 

1 person - $45,100 3 people - $58,000 5 people - $69,600 7 people - $79,000 

2 people -$51,550 4 people - $64,400 6 people - $74,750 8 people - $85,050 

Apartment Turnover 

Senior/Disabled Program - 26 Units or (12%) Average Rent: $298 (including utilities) 

Family Program - 3 units or (5%) Average Rent: $414 (including utilities) 

(including transfers to larger or smaller units and reasonable accommodation moves) 

State-funded Grants - Capital Improvements 

$1 1 1,566 awarded by DHCD for the replacement and installation of 222 toilets. 
$33,000 awarded by Action Energy for 94 Chestnut Court boiler/water heater 
replacement co-generation system. 
■ $663,479 awarded by DHCD in conjunction with approved CIP funds for: Site work and 
window replacement at Frye Circle; Roof replacement (as needed) at Chestnut Court; 
Boiler replacement at Stowe Court; ADA requirements as presented and Group home 
roof replacement at 94 Chestnut Court. 

State-funded Grant - New Horizons for Youth Program 

An after school homework program for Memorial Circle children funded through the Andover 

Police Department. 

Federally-funded Programs 

The AHA administers 127 Vouchers under the Section 8 Housing Choice Voucher Program 

through HUD. Section 8 Income Limits are as follows: 

1 person - $3 1 ,950 3 people - $39,750 5 people - $47,700 7 people - $54,750 

2 people - $35,350 4 people -$44,150 6 people -$51,250 8 people- $58,300 

97 



COMMISSION ON DISABILITY 

Tlie mission of the Andover Commission on Disability is to address Andover's needs for 
the Town, its residents, visitors, friends, employers and families relative to disability. The 
Commission is an advisory board appointed by the Board of Selectmen to advocate on disability- 
related issues. TJie majority of the Commission members must be disabled or directly related to 
disability. Included in the Co??unissio?j 's goals are enhancing the participation of people with 
disabilities in Town activities, research into the needs and problems of residents with 
disabilities, the provision of information, referral and technical assistance to individuals and 
organizations in matters pertaining to disability, the monitoring of local, regional, state and 
federal programs for disabled residents and the support of training related to disability to people 
who reside or work in the Town of Andover. 



In keeping with its mission - to address Andover's needs relative to disability - the 
Commission has maintained its focus. An advisory board appointed by the Board of Selectmen, 
the Commission on Disability" is an acknowledged and consistent advocate of disability-related 
issues in the Town of Andover. 

During 201 1. the Commission continued to work closely with the Planning Division, the 
Plant and Facilities Department and the Department of Public Works to monitor and ensure that 
new and newly-renovated construction is in compliance with the mandates of the Americans 
with Disabilities Act of 1990. In addition, accessibility issues for playgrounds and conservation 
areas were also a concern reviewed with planning groups. The Commission also monitors Town 
roadways and passageways to provide equal access for all residents. Throughout the year, 
Commission members gather data that is then presented to the appropriate Town department 
responsible for the particular location or project. Ongoing, the Commission responds to citizen 
complaints regarding lack of access which then become points of negotiation with local business 
and property owners. 

ACOD has been promoting a development concept in new construction known as 
"Concrete Change". This concept encourages the development of homes with basic access for 
the disabled such as zero-step entrances and entrances that are wide enough to accommodate 
wheelchairs. Instructional fliers regarding this concept have been placed in various locations 
throughout the Town. The fliers promote basic access in new construction and provide 
photographs of how this access works to the advantage of homeowners. 

Regarding Handicap Parking, Project Lifesaver and Emergency Preparedness, the 
Commission maintains its support of the Police Department particularly with the needs of 
disabled citizens in mind. The Commission's educational thrust has been to sponsor specialized 
teaching methods on disabilities such as New Kids on the Block and to supplement equipment 
for Special Education students. ACOD's modest budget is directed to one-time only proposals 
or new program initiatives for special needs individuals. 

The Commission's website can be found at htrp: andoverma. gov, boards disability It is 
intended to inform residents of new programs and services for the disabled as w T ell as areas of 
concern needing to be addressed. 



98 



PRESERVATION COMMISSION 

The Andover Preservation Commission endeavors to fulfill its mission to advise the Town 
concerning the preservation of its historic and archeological resources. 



During the year, the Preservation Commission was active in the following areas: 

DEMOLITION DELAY BYLAW 

The Preservation Commission heard demolition requests for eleven properties. Seven structures 
were deemed historically significant. Two historically significant buildings were razed. Five 
buildings are in demolition delay periods prior to demolition. Four buildings were determined 
not to be historically signficant and razed. 

REVIEW OF PLANS 

Thirty-seven applications were submitted to be reviewed for historic design compatibility. Ten 

of those applications required no formal review. 

DIMENSIONAL SPECL\L PERMIT HISTORIC PRESERVATION 
One request was submitted for review. 

LOCAL HISTORIC DISTRICTS 

The Andover Preservation Commission and the Ballardvale Historic District Commission work 

cooperatively on issues of mutual interest. 

DESIGN REVIEW BOARD 

The Commission remains vitally interested in the historic buildings and character of downtown 

and Main Street corridor to Rt. 495. 

WEST PARISH GARDEN CEMETERY COMMITTEE 
See westparishgardencemetery.org for more information. 

HERITAGE EDUCATION PRESERVATION AWARDS 

The 21 th Annual Andover Preservation Awards were held on May 17. 2011 at Memorial Hall 
Library in cooperation with the Andover Historical Society and the Ballardvale Historic District 
Commission. Nine outstanding examples of historic preservation were awarded in the 
community this year. 

PROJECTS OF NOTE 

■ Historic Building Survey Project - mnr.m/7/.org historicpreservation 

The historic preservation website is a digitized version of the general survey of Andover' s 
historic buildings from the late 1 7th century through the early 20th century. The website, 
hosted by Memorial Hall Library, allows researchers and Town departments internet 
access to this information as well as maps of the Town's historic districts., information on 
house renovation and links to other resources. As a work in progress, it will be modified 



99 



as new information becomes available. Phase 2 of this project will broaden the survey to 
include appropriate 20 th century buildings. 

Preservation Restrictions 

The Commission continues to develop goals and pursue opportunities to better preserve 
Andover's historic resources. Preservation restrictions are an approval requirement of the 
Dimensional Special Permit for Historic Preservation. The Commission encourages 
individual homeowners to consider Preservation Restrictions or easements for the 
protection of their historic properties. Two properties received Preservation Restriction 
approval from the Massachusets Historical Commission this year. 

Historic Restoration/Rehabilitation Information 

Acting in our advisory capacity, the Commission is developing and offering educational 
materials to the public. These resources help individual building owners understand the 
meaning of historic preservation, instructs them on the selection of appropriate materials 
and directs them to appropriate alternatives when cost is an issue. As always, the 
Commission will advise building owners on their historic preservation projects. All new 
information will be available on the website. 



100 



ANIMAL INSPECTION 



2009 



2010 



2011 



Number of dogs quarantined for biting 

Number of animals tested for rabies 

Number testing positive for rabies 

Number of cats quarantined for rabies exposure 

Number of dogs quarantined for rabies exposure 

Number of barns inspected 

Number of beef cattle 

Number of beef steers 

Number of beef herds 

Number of horses 

Number of donkeys 

Number of sheep 

Number of goats 

Number of swine 

Number of swine herds 

Number of llamas 



18 


13 


10 


7 


5 


6 











35 


47 


25 


14 


26 


14 


15 


20 


19 





2 


3 





1 








1 


1 


68 


86 


77 


5 


5 


5 





4 








20 


17 


100 


77 


60 


1 


1 


1 


27 


27 


34 



The annual Rabies Immunization Clinic was held on Saturday, April 3, 2011 at the 
Andover Animal Hospital on Lowell Street. 



101 



MARGARET G. TOWLE FUND 

Under the terms of her will, the late Margaret G. Towle. long-time resident of Andover, 
bequeathed the residue of her estate to the Town of Andover. to be held and administered by it as a 
permanent trust fund. This trust is now known as the Margaret G. Towle Fund. Mrs. Towle 
stipulated in her will that the income from this fund "be devoted to the assistance of the procurement 
of assistance for worthy persons residing in the Town of Andover who may be in need of aid, 
comfort or support on account of old age. disability or unemployment." 

The Fund is administered by a group of three Trustees, chosen by the Town Manager with the 
approval of the Board of Selectmen, which has disbursed the income from the Fund in accordance 
with the terms of Mrs. Towle's will. The cases are referred to the Trustees by private charitable 
groups and organizations, the Clergy and interested individuals. 

During 201 1, the Trustees acted on fourteen cases, disbursing S 13,940.66. Only the income 
of the Fund is available. The principal of S345.825.50 and a substantial portion of the current 
income are invested under the direction of the Trustees. All disbursements are made by the Town 
Treasurer upon vouchers approved by the Trustees. 

Balance of Income as of Dec. 31, 2010 
Receipts - 20 1 1 



590,987.30 
14.582.54 


5105,569.84 
13.940.66 



Disbursements - 201 1 

Balance of Income as of Dec. 31.2011 91.629.18 



JOHN CORNELL FUEL ASSISTANCE FUND 

The John Cornell Fuel Assistance Fund was established by Article 17 of the 1893 Annual 
Town Meeting. Five thousand dollars was left to the Town to be used for the needy and poor to 
purchase wood or coal. In 1995 the trust documents were modified by the Probate Court of 
Massachusetts to permit the use of all Types of fuel for heating, cooking or electrical purposes. Three 
Trustees, with staggered terms approved by vote at the Annual Town Meeting, administer the funds. 
The Trustees approved three applications during the year. 



Balance on hand 6 30 10 S53, 161.36 

Income -FY-2011 829.22 

Expenditures - FY-20 1 1 1.200.00 

Balnea is :: 6 3 ." 1 1 S54.798.83 



102 



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103 



TOWN OF ANDOVER, MASSCHUSETTS 

COMBINED STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENDITURES AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCES 

ALL GOVERNMENTAL FUND TYPES AND EXPENDABLE TRUST FUNDS 

FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING 6/30/2011 

Proprietary Fund Type 
Water Sewer Capital Special 
General Fund Enterprise Enterprise Projects Revenue 



Internal 
Service 



Fund Type 

Expendable 

Trust 



Revenues: 

Motor Vehicle Excise 

Other Excise 

Penalties and Interest on Taxes and Excises 

Payments in Lieu of Taxes 

Fees 

Charges for Services - Water 

Charges for Services - Sewer 

Departmental Revenue - School 

Departmental Revenue - Library 

Other Departmental Revenue (dist to non recu 

Utility Liens 

Licenses and Permits 

Special Assessments 

Fines and Forfeits 

Investment Income 

Other 

Intergovernmental 

Real/Personal Property Taxes 

Tax Titles 
Offset 

DCS 

Elder Services 

Rentals 

Off Duty Admin Fee 

Cemetery Internment Fees 

Ambulance Fees 
Trust Fund and other 



Expenditures 

General Government 

Community Service 

Municipal Maintenance 

Public Safety 

Water Enterprises 

Sewer Enterprise 

Public Works 

Library 

School 

Insurance 

Health Insurance 

Debt Service 

Unemployment Comp 

Retirement 

State and County Assessments 

Other 



Other Financing Sources (Uses) 



Long Term Bond Issuance 

Health Insurance Appropriation 
Art 05, 2010 201 1 Capital Projects 
Adj of MSAB Funds- 2010 
Reserve Fund #6 Trans to Special I 
Art 43, 201 1 Vehicles 
Art 18, 2011 Fund 6343 
Art 21, 2011 Fund 6344 
Art 20, 2011 OPEB Funding 
Art 38. 201 1 Wood 
Water Enterprise Indirects 
Sewer Enterprise Indirects 
Receipts Reserved - Wetland Filing 
Receipts Reserved - Parking Recei 
From Perpetual Cares 



Excess (Deficiency) of Revenues over 
(Under) expenditures and other 
Financing Sources (Uses) 



Fund Balance July 1, 2010 
Fund Balance June 30, 201 1 



4,531,283.16 

1,767,063.06 

409,888.18 

160,994.70 

29,799.90 

0.00 

0.00 

262,822.55 

13,099.91 

734,194.42 

0.00 

1,501,638.17 

0.00 

440,928.34 

94,811.55 

0.00 

10,294,441.00 

103,110,919.48 

250,935.47 

550,261.00 
122,793.59 
70,346.01 
70,346.01 
52,678.00 
1,052,352.13 



6,931,522.97 

3,325,369.38 

254,449.09 

105,777.63 77,926.93 

1,558.62 1,721,496.99 

3,075.39 6,446.19 



2,509.59 



313,296.60 



16,870.517.10 



446,938.00 



5,694,861.68 
1,656,443.23 
4,501,501.64 



487,427.53 
2,104.572.16 






Total 

(Memorandum! 

Only) 



4,531,; 

1,767,063.1 

409,888 

160,994; 

29,799.- 

6.931,522! 

3.325,369.: 

262,822 

13,099! 

988,643 

183,704 

1.501,638i 

1,723,055! 

440,928 

420,139 

16,870,517.1 

10,741,3791 

103,110,919.1 

250,935* 



0.00 










4,824,551.12 


464,516.92 


5,289,068* 


125,521,596.63 


7,296,383.70 


5,131,239.49 


446,938.00 


16,870,517.10 


4,827.060.71 


777,813.52 


160,871,549' 



14,258,639.15 






348,544.19 








14,607,183.31 


0.00 


3,435,042.23 




663,468.21 








4.098,510* 


0.00 




2,193.849.45 


339,280.16 








2,533,129.61 


5,714,338.26 














5,714.3382$ 


2,529,868.90 














2,529,86890 


61,866,194.09 






3,710,674.63 


10,937,475.86 






76.514,34458 


734,996.30 














734.996.3J 


19,759.50 














19.759.S 


11,820,643.97 














1 1 .820,643 97 


204,000.00 














2O4.000.M 


4,712,555.00 














4.712,555.00 


2,860.658.00 














2.860,658.00 


484,693.99 






561,875.63 


4,723.509.31 


18,513,000.77 


54,845.90 


24,337,925.60 


117,059,153.71 


3,435,042.23 


2,193,849.45 


8.215,84251 


15,660,985.17 


18,513,000.77 


54,845.90 


165.132,71974 


0.00 






7,550,000.00 








7,550,000.00 


(13,640,000.00) 










13,640,000.00 




0.00 


(1,246,000.00) 






1,246,000.00 








O.00 


(76,862.00) 






76,86200 








O.00 


I (23,412.00) 








23,412.00 






O.00 


0.00 


(35,000.00) 


(35,000.00) 


70,000.00 








0.00 


(35,000.00) 






35,000.00 








0.00 


(25,000.00) 






25,000.00 








0.00 


(300,000.00) 


(100,000.00) 








400,000.00 




0.00 


0.00 






31,000.00 






(31,000.00) 


0.00 


2,518,696.00 


(2,518,696.00) 












0.00 


3,313,512.00 




(3,313,512.00) 










0.CO 


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O.00 


278,864.00 








(278,864.00) 






0.00 


34,000.00 












(34,000.00) 


oc: 


(9,181,202.00) 


(2,653,696.00) 


(3,348,512.00) 


9,033,862.00 


(275,452.00) 


14,040,000.00 


(65,000.00) 


7,550,000.00 


(718,759.08) 


1,207,645.47 


(411,121.96) 


1,264,957.49 


934,079.93 


354,059.94 


657,967.62 


3,288,829.41 


4,997,198.04 


407,502.95 


2,801,017.74 


4,498,067.26 


4,334,437.46 


746,141.02 


7,826,457.45 


25,610,821.92 


4,278,438.96 


1,615,148.42 


2,389,895.78 


5,763,024.75 


5,268,517.39 


1,100,200.96 


8,484,425.07 


28.899.651 S 



















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113 



TRUST-CEMETERY -SPECIAL FUNDS 

IN CUSTODY OF THE TOWN TREASURER 

YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 2011 



FUND 



BALANCE 
July 1,2010 



DEPOSITS 



OTHER 



INCOME 



BALANCE 
June 30, 2011 



STABILIZATION 
CD. WOOD 
OPEBART21.2010 
ESTATE S.P. WHITE 
POLICE DRUG ACCOUNT 
TOWN 400TH CELEBRATION 



J. GREELEY 


5,000.00 


MARGARET G. TOWLE 


345,825.50 


MARGARET G. TOWLE 




JOHN CORNELL 


5,000.00 


DAVID & LUCY SHAW 


10,000.00 


W.L RAYMOND 


7.845.81 


AJ. LINCOLN 


5.000.00 


E.L RAYMOND 


1,302.77 


TAYLOR 


300.00 


SPRING GROVE 


932.825.77 


SPRING GROVE FLOWERS 




EMIUNE LINCOLN 


1.000.00 


EMMA J. LINCOLN 





CONSERVATION FUND 

SMART 1,000.00 

FARRINGTON 
BALLARDVALE 

ALLEN 200.00 

EMS BELL LIBRARY TRUST 
ELDERLY TAXATION FUND 
MUNICIPAL AFFORDABLE HOUSING 
DRAPER 

RICHARDSON 1,000.00 

A &AV LINCOLN 1.000.00 



RAFTON (INTEREST) 
RAFTON (PRINCIPAL) 

CONROY 

AMERICAN LEGION 

CHRIS MAYNARD BOOKS 

HOLT 



INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS 
INSURANCE 

UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION 
TOWN INSURANCE HEALTH 
WORKERS COMPENSATION 
TOTAL INTERNAL SERVICE FUNDS 
GRAND TOTAL ALL TRUST FUNDS 



598.50 



4,433,140.70 

1.193,490.66 

258,120.00 

16,222.76 

19,724.11 

9,389.23 

7,761.33 

345,825.50 
94,314.69 

53,161.36 

50.289.76 

56,941.70 

23.792.86 

3,084.49 

2,180.67 

1.010,779.33 

35,475.15 

2,100.38 
1.150.70 

68,514.27 

16,331.24 

2,019.38 

1,423.88 

246.00 

60,531.58 

13,927.77 

10,810.57 

18,081.94 

1 .590.68 

1,194.44 

598.50 
5,084.18 

1.837.00 

1.354.55 

5.142.28 

823.81 



400,000.00 



829.22 



14,937.00 



7,826,457.45 

242,157.85 
89,595.51 

402.210.25 
12,177.41 



166,217.89 

45,467.33 

45,889.10 

49.54 

10.09 

354.26 

293.79 

16,348.19 

2,008.25 

1,898.45 

2.150.06 

72.66 

116.44 

82.34 

22,084.15 

1,348.30 

79.28 
711.00 

1,918.99 

616.61 

76.32 

53.90 

9.37 

2,284 88 

1,350.98 

408.15 

682.60 

62.26 

44.79 

260.54 
69.35 
51.13 

194.51 
31.10 



18.461.04 
1.200.00 



65,000.00 
1.465.00 



15.00 
15.00 
25.00 
25.00 

14.017.55 



204,618.91 
4.826.714.21 13,640,000.00 
193.218.00 



739.12 

322.01 

1,448.46 



119,845.90 

42,188.00 

134.129.79 

18.174,990.98 

161,692.00 



4,599,358.59 

1.238,957.99 

704,009.10 

16,272.30 

18,653.93 

9,743.49 

8,055.12 

345.825.50 
92,201.84 

54,798.83 

52.188.21 

59.091.76 

23,865.52 

3,200.93 

2,26301 

982.800.48 

35.358.45 

2.179.66 
1,861.70 

70,433.26 

16.93285 

2.080.70 

1,452.78 

230.37 

48,79891 

15,278.75 

41.418.72 

18,764.54 

1,652.94 

1.239.23 

598.50 
5,543.92 

1,906.35 

1,405.68 

5,146.25 

854.91 



8,484,425.07 

200,708.97 

160,406.64 

695,381.94 

43,703.41 



746.141.02 


5.031,333.12 


13,833.218.00 


2,509.59 


18,513,000.77 


1,100,200.96 


8,572.598.47 


5 495 S59 n 


13 833.218.03 


315.806.19 


18 682 645.87 


9.584 525 03 



8.566,332.97 
6,265.50 



8 572 598.47 



114 



TOWN OF ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

ANALYSIS OF BONDS AUTHORIZED AND OUTSTANDING 

Activity for Fiscal 2012 Through 12/22/12) 



MUNIS ARTICLE 



PROJECT NAME 



AUTHORIZATION NEW BONDING 

JULY01.2011 AUTHORIZATION 



CLOSEOUT 



AUTHORIZATION 
December 22, 201 1 



BANS 

OUTSTANDING 

DUE 2012 



SEWER ENTERPRISE 

6170 ART 33 2006 REPAIR/REPLACEMENT SANITARY SEWER 
6192 ART 64 2007 SHAWSHEEN PUMPING STATION 
6216 ART 33 2008 SHAWSHEEN RIVER OUTFALL SEWER 
6220 ART 51 2008 SEWER MAIN CONSTRUCTION & RECONST 
6322 ART 32 2010 SEWER MAIN CONST & RECONST 
6328 ART 46 2010 SEWER LINE EXT - LINCOLN ST 



150,000.00 
550,000.00 
2,200,000.00 
300,000.00 
500,000.00 
225,000.00 



3,925,000.00 



225,000.00 



0.00 225,000.00 



0.00 



150,000.00 
550,000 00 
2,200,000.00 
300,000.00 
500,000.00 
0.00 



3,700,000.00 



0.00 



WATER ENTERPRISE 
6321 ART 31 2010 WATER MAIN CONST & RECONST 

6323 ART 33 2010 WATER TREAT PLANT GAC REPLACE 

6324 ART 34 2010 WATER TREAT PLANT - HVAC & EQUIP 

6341 ART 42 2011 WATER DISTRIBUTION IMPROVEMENTS 

6342 ART 44 2011 WTP VARIABLE SPEED PUMP (Split Funding) 



TOTAL ENTERPRISE FUNDS 



500,000.00 
700,000.00 
250,000.00 
500,000.00 
440,000.00 



2,390,000.00 



6,315,000.00 



400,000.00 
250,000.00 



0.00 650.000.00 



0.00 875,000.00 



0.00 



500,000.00 
300,000.00 
0.00 
500,000.00 
440,000.00 



1,740,000.00 



0.00 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 
LANDFILL CLOSURE 

6072 ART 44 1999 LANDFILL CLOSURE 
6214 ART 31 2008 LANDFILL CLOSURE 



1,700,000.00 
7,370,000.00 



0.00 800,000.00 



0.00 



900,000.00 
7,370,000.00 



8,270,000.00 



700,000.00 



700,000.00 



SCHOOL 

6315 ART 59 2009 BANCROFT FEASIBILITY STUDY * 
6326 ART 41 2010 SCHOOL BUILDING MAINTANCE 
6331 ART 3A 2010 BANCROFT SCHOOL PROJECT * 

6333 ART 16 2011 SCHOOL BLDG MAINTENANCE 

6334 ART 17 2011 WEST MIDDLE SCHOOL GREEN REPAIR 



260,800.00 

525,000.00 

43,835,000.00 

925,000.00 

1,250,000.00 



162,000.00 
525,000.00 



925,000.00 
655,000.00 



264,200.00 
730,382.00 

451,20600 



98,800.00 

-264,200.00 

43,104,618.00 

0.00 

143,794.00 



46,795,800.00 



0.00 2,267,000.00 1,445,788.00 



43,083,012.00 



525,000.00 
2,000,000.00 

2,525,000.00 



ROAD AND DRAINAGE 

6106 ART 12 2001 LAND ACQUISITION LOWELL JCTRD 
6215 ART 32 2008 BRIDGE REPAIRS 

6336 ART 24 2011 TOWN BRIDGE EVALUATION AND REPAIRS 

6337 ART 25 2011 PEARSON STREET PARKING LOT 
6339 ART 33 2011 STORM DRAIN IMPROVEMENETS 

6338 ART 26 2011 HIGH PLAIN @ FISHBROOK DESIGN 



800,000.00 
200,000.00 
100,000.00 

85,000.00 
300,000.00 

75,000.00 



100,000.00 
85.000.00 

200,000.00 
75,000.00 



1,560,000.00 



0.00 460,000.00 



0.00 



800,000.00 

200,000.00 

0.00 

0.00 

100,000.00 

0.00 



1,100,000.00 



0.00 



CONSERVATION AND LAND ACQUSITION 

6123 ART 23 2002 CONSERVATION FUND 

6329 ART 55 2010 CONSERVATION LAND - FOSTERS POND 



400,000.00 
260,000.00 



660,000.00 



0.00 



400,000.00 
260,000.00 



0.00 



TOWN BUILDINGS 

6180 ART 27 2007 TOWN BUILDING MAINT/IMPROVE 

6310 ART 34 2009 BALLARDVALE FIRE STATION STUDY 

6313 ART 57 2009 BLANCHARD ST BALLFIELDS 

6327 ART 42 2010 TOWN BLDG MAINT & RENOVATION 

6340 ART 34 2011 TOWN BUILDING MAINT AND RENOVATION 

MISCELLANEOUS 

6320 ART 30 2010 FIRE RESCUE AMBULANCE 
6325 ART 40 2010 DPW VEHICLES 
6335 ART 23 2011 DPW VEHICLES 



TOTAL GENERAL GOVERNMENT 
GRAND TOTAL 



300.000.00 
100,000.00 
325,000.00 
163,000.00 
500,000.00 



1,388,000.00 

225,000.00 
126,000.00 
300,000.00 



100,000.00 
100,000.00 
325,000.00 
163,000.00 
500,000.00 



0.00 1,188,000.00 

225,000.00 
126,000.00 
300.000.00 



0.00 



200,000.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 
0.00 



200,000.00 

0.00 
0.00 
0.00 



651,000.00 


0.00 651,000.00 


0.00 


0.00 


60,124,800.00 


0.00 5,366,000.00 


1,445,788.00 


53,313,012.00 


66,439.800.00 


0.00 6,241,000.00 


1,445,788.00 


58,753,012.00 



163,000.00 
163,000.00 
225,000.00 

225,000.00 
3,613,000.00 
3,613,000.00" 



* = Exempt - MSBA Reimb 
**= Non-Exempt - MSBA Reimb 



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119 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 
ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

STATEMENT FOR THE TWELVE MONTHS ENDING June 30, 2011 

CAPITAL ACCOUNT 
SUMMARY OF TRANSACTIONS 





1-Jul-2010 PRINCIPAL FUND 




Money Market Fund (CBPF) 
Securities @ Book 
Bonds @ Book 
Res.for Cost/Mkt. 


30-Jun-2011 


Money Market Fund CBPF) 
Securities @ Book 
Bonds @ Book 
Res.for Cost/Mkt. 


$0.00 Gain/loss from Sales of Securities 
$218,979.99 Transfers to/from Operating accts 
$25,000.00 Decrease from Sales of Bonds 
$0.00 Adjustment to lower of Cost/Market 


$8, 14a 89 

$10,095.00 

$0.00 

$0.00 


$0.00 

$237,221.88 

$25,000.00 

$0.00 




$243,979.99 Increase 


$18,241.89 


$262,221.88 




OPERATING ACCOUNTS 







(RESERVE FUND & CASH ACCOUNTS) 



INCOME 



Savings Account 

Checking Account 

Money Market Fund (CBRF) 



Capital Gains - MFs 


$0.00 






Gain/(Loss) - Sale of Securities 


$8,146.89 






Stock Dividends - Foreign 


$2,148.60 






$0.00 Dividends Received 


$4,972.00 


Savings Account 


$0.00 


$1 ,471 . 1 1 Interest Received-Bonds/Notes 


$435.83 


Checking Account 


$664.02 


$19,335.39 Interest Received-Broker/MM 


$5.96 


Money Market Fund (CBRF) 


$10,740.73 


Other income - royalty 








Other income 


$167.86 






Foreign tax withheld 


-$154.27 






$20,806.50 Income Total 


$15,722.87 


$11,404.75 


EXPENSES 







Foreign Taxes - paid 

Andover High School Projects 



$0.00 





2009/2010 


$0.00 




2010/2011 


$4,719.48 


Taxable interest 




-$0.06 


Misc. Operating Expenses 




$0.00 


Investment Counsel Fees 




$75.00 


Honorarium 




$600.00 


Office supplies 




$39.91 


Printing/Copying 




$58.70 


Other expenses 




$0.70 


Bank service charge 




$0.00 


Brokerage fees/taxes 




$1,389.00 


Expense 


Total 


$6,882.73 



Net Ordinary Income 



$8,840.14 



Net Income $8,840.14 

$264,786.49 TOTAL PRINCIPAL AND OPERATING ACCOUNTS 



$273,626.63 



120 



2:59 PM 
7/19/2011 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 

ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 01810 

CAPITAL ACCOUNT 

SECURITIES BOUGHT AND SOLD 
TWELVE MONTHS ENDED -June 30, 2011 



BEGINNING BOOK VALUE - 7/1/2010 



LESS: STOCKS/MUTUAL FUNDS- Sold/Exchanged 



8/16/2010 Sold 
12/14/2010 Sold 



15000.000 units Time Warner Inc 
500.000 shs Atmos Energy 

Total Sold 



ADD: STOCKS/MUTUAL FUNDS - Acquired 



7/13/2010 Bought 
10/15/2010 Bought 

12/9/2010 Bought 
12/14/2010 Bought 
12/23/2010 Bought 



BOOK VALUE 6/30/2011 



300.000 shs 
150.000 shs 
300.000 shs 



Walgreen Co. 
Devon Energy Corp 
Koninluke Philips EL 



200.000 shs Hewlett Packard 
400.000 shs Weyerheauser Co 

Total Acquired 



PROCEEDS COST GAIN/(LOSS) 

STOCKS & MUTUAL FUNDS 

218,979.99 



$17,844.75 $14,472.75 
$15,304.39 $10,529.50 

$33,149.14 $25,002.25 



Cost 

$8,430.65 

$9,987.74 

$8,949.65 

$8,530.85 

$7,345.25 

$43,244.14 

237,221.88 



$3,372.00 
$4,774.89 

$8,146.89 



BEGINNING BOOK VALUE - 7/1/2010 

LESS: BONDS/NOTES - Sold/Matured/Redeemed 

9/21/2010 Redeemed 25000 shs FFCB Bond 02.940% due 122115 



BONDS/NOTES 



$25,000.00 

25,000.00 



TOTAL Sold/Matured 
ADD: BONDS/NOTES - Acquired 
11/16/2010 Acquired 25000 shs FFCB Bond 00.500% due 11/16/12 



TOTAL Acquired 
Gain/loss 



BOOK VALUE -6/302011 



$25,000.00 
25,000.00 



$25,000.00 

$0.00 

$25,000.00 



TOTAL SECURITIES/MUTUAL FUNDS @ BOOK VALUE - 6/30/201 1 

RESERVE FOR LOWER OF COST/MARKET VALUE 

TOTAL SECURITIES/MUTUAL FUNDS @ ADJ. BOOK VALUE - 6/302011 

Broker - Cash/MM Reserve and Principal Funds- 6/30/2011 
TDBN Checking account 6/30/201 1 

TOTAL VALUE OF ASSETS - 6/30/2011 



$262,221.88 Gain/fLoss) 
$8,146.89 

$0:00 

$262,221.88 

$10,740.73 
$664.02 

$273,626.63 



2 
121 



3:01 PM 
7/19/2011 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 
Capital Account 

FUNDED PROJECTS 2010-2011 SCHOOL YEAR 
(01JuI2010-3QJun2011) 

PROJECT 

1. Literary men's reading project 

2. AHS Robotics Club (IstTech Challenge) 

3. Principal's Discretionary Fund ($4000.00 this year) 

3a plus $3000 left over from last year's Prin Discret fund 

to be used against the 2010 Summer Reading Initative, of which 
$2216.00 has been requested and spent in June 2010 (A) 

3b plus $950 left over from last year's Andover Band Fund $950.00 carry over 

NO money is to be carried over to the 2011-2012 school year 

Total $9,950.00 







Unexpended 


Approved 


Expended 


Balance 


at trustee's meeting 






29-Apr-2010 


asof30Jun11 


as of30Jun11 


$1,000.00 


996.48 


3.52 


$1,000.00 


1,000.00 


0.00 


$4,000.00 


2,723.00 - 


1,277.00 


$3,000.00 carry over 


(A) 


784.00 



0.00 



4,719.48 



950.00 



$3,014.52 



DETAILS OF MISC. OPERATING EXPENSE 

(01Jul10-30Jun11) 





1-Ju«010 




thru 




30-Jun-2011 


Copying/Printing Costs 


$58.70, 


Postage 


$0.00 


Office Supplies - Computer cartridges, paper (1/3) 


$39.91/ 


Other miscellaneous expenses 


$0.00 


Fidelity Insurance 


$0.00 


Treasurer's Honorarium 


$600.00 


Total 


698.61 



3 

122 



3:04 PM 
7/19/2011 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 
ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

FUNDS ANALYSIS AS OF: June 30, 2011 
CAPITAL ACCOUNT 

PRINCIPAL FUND 



CASH 

Money Market Fund 

STOCKS & BONDS 

25000 000 Shs FFCB Bond 00.500% due 11/16/12 (Bought 11/16/2010) 
150.000 Shs Devon Energy Corp (Bought 10/15/2010) 
300.000 Shs Koninluke Philips EL (Bought 12/9/2010) 
200.000 Shs Hewlett Packard (Bought 12/14/2010) 
400.000 Shs Weyerhaeuser Co (Bought 12/23/2010) 
300.000 Shs Walgreen Co (Bought 7/13/10) 
25000.000 Shs FFCB Call Bond 02.940% due 1221 15) (Soldi 9/21/10: cost $25000.00) 
250.000 Shs Merck & Co (Bought 5/21/10: cost 8196.20) 
250.000 Shs Encana Corp (Bought 5/21/10: cost 8287.65) 
300.000 Shs Analog Devices (Bought 4/29/10; cost 9436.46) 
200.000 Shs Best Buy (BoughTI 0/1 5/09; cost $7904.12) 
250.000 Shs Marathon Oil (Bought 10/16/2009: cost $8234.74) 
500.000 Shs Coming Inc (Bought 8/18/09:Cost $8190.25) 
200.000 Shs Barrick Gold Inc (Bought 9/4/2009:Cost $7020.21) 
200.000 Shs Southern Co 
15000.000 Shs Time Warner Inc (sold 8/16/2010) 
600.000 Shs Duke Energy Holding Corp 
300.000 Shs MDU Resources Group 
200.000 Shs Anadarko Petroleum Corp 
300.000 Shs Itnl Paper Co. 
200.000 Shs Novartis AG 
200.000 Shs Glaxo Smithkline PLC 
400.000 Shs Pfizer 
300.000 Shs CVS 

500.000 Shs. Atmos Energy Corp (sold 12/14/10). 
600.000 Shs General Electric 
300.000 Shs. Honeywell Intl. Inc. 
200.000 Shs. KJmberly Clark Corp. 
300 000 Shs. Unilever PLC 



TOTAL STOCKS & BONDS 



TOTAL MONEY MARKET & SECURITIES 

Reserve for Lower of Cost /Market 

Change in value of outside assets/accruals 
Accrued Interest 

TOTAL PRINCIPAL FUND 



RESERVE FUND 



BANKNORTH CD ACCOUNT 
MONEY MARKET CASH FUND 









Market Value 


Book 


Book 


Market 


Over/(Under) 


Value 


Value 


Value 


Book Value 


as of 


as of 


as of 


as of 


1^Jul-20tO 


3O-Jun-2001 


30Jun-2001 


3O-Jun-2011 


$19,335.39 


$10,740.73 


$10,740.73 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$25,000.00 


$25,001.00 


$1.00 


$0.00 


$9,987.74 


$11,821.50 


$1,833.76 


$0.00 


$8,949.65 


$7,704.00 


-$1,245.65 


$0.00 


$B,530.85 


$7,280.00 


-$1,250.85 


$0.00 


$7,345.25 


$8,744.00 


$1,398.75 


$0.00 


$6,430.65 


$12,738.00 


$4,307.35 


$25,000.00 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$8,196.20 


$8,196.20 


$8,B22.50 


$626.30 


$8,287.65 


$8,287.65 


$7,697.50 


-$590.15 


$9,438.46 


$9,436.46 


$11,74Z00 


$2,305.54 


$7,904.12 


$7,904.12 


$6,282.00 


-$1,622.12 


$8,234.74 


$8,234.74 


$13,170.00 


$4,935.26 


$8,190.25 


$8,19025 


$9,075.00 


$884.75 


$7,020.21 


$7,020.21 


$9,058.00 


$2,037.79 


$5,988.54 


$5,988.64 


$8,076.00 


$2,087.36 


$14,472.75 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$10,938.57 


$10,938.57 


$11,298.00 


$359.43 


$9,171.35 


$9,171.35 


$6,750.00 


-$2,421.35 


$8,922.47 


$8,922.47 


$15,352.00 


$6,429.53 


$10,173.46 


$10,173.46 


$8,946.00 


-$1,227.48 


$11,690.87 


$11,690.87 


$12,222.00 


$531.13 


$11,099.25 


$11,099.25 


$8,580.00 


-$2,519.25 


$10,219.25 


$10,219.25 


$8,240.00 


-$1,979.25 


$9,481.25 


$9,481.25 


$11,274.00 


$1,792.75 


$10,529.50 


$0.00 


$0.00 


$000 


$15,021 05 


$15,021.05 


$11,31600 


-$3,705.05 


$10,673.98 


$10,673.98 


$17,877.00 


$7,203.02 


$11,696.03 


$11,696.03 


$13,312.00 


$1,615.97 


$11,631.94 


$11,631.94 


$17,490.60 


$5,858.66 


$243,979.99 


$262,221.88 $289,869.10 


$27,647.22 



$263,315.38 $272,982.61 $300,609.83 

$0.00 $0.00 $0.00 

$16.80 



$263,315.38 $272,962.61 $300,626.63 



$0.00 
$0.00 



TOTAL RESERVE FUND 



$0.00 



$0.00 
$0.00 



$0.00 



$0.00 
$0.00 

$0.00 



$0.00 



$27,647.22 



$0.00 
$0.00 



$0.00 



CASH FUND 



CHECKING ACCOUNT - Banknorth 

TOTAL FUNDS 6/30/201 1 



$1,471.11 



$664.02 



$664.02 



$264,786.49 $273,626.63 $301,290.65 



$0.00 
$27,647.22 



123 



3:06 PM 
7/19/2011 



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124 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 

ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 01810 

SCHOLARSHIP ACCOUNT 

SECURITIES BOUGHT AND SOLD 
TWELVE MONTHS ENDED - June 30, 2611 



BEGINNING BOOK VALUE - 7/1/2010 

LESS: STOCKS/MUTUAL FUNDS- Sold/Exchanged 



PROCEEDS COST GAIN/(LOSS) 

STOCKS & MUTUAL FUNDS 

$224,020.81 



TOTAL Sold 
ADD: STOCKS/MUTUAL FUNDS - Acquired 



$0.00 



$0.00 



$0.00 



TOTAL Acquired 



BOOK VALUE -6/30/2011 



BEGINNING BOOK VALUE - 7/1/2010 

LESS: BONDS/NOTES - Sold/Matured/Redeemed 



None 



ADD: BONDS/NOTES'- Acquired 



None 



BOOK VALUE - 6/30/2011 



TOTAL Sold/Matured 



TOTAL Acquired 



0.00 
224,020.81 

BONDS/NOTES 



TOTAL SECURITIES/MUTUAL FUNDS @ BOOK VALUE - 6/30/201 T 

RESERVE FOR LOWER OF COST/MARKET VALUE 

TOTAL SECURITIES/MUTUAL FUNDS @ ADJ. BOOK VALUE - 6/30/2011 

Broker- Cash/MM Reserve Funds and Checking Account- 6/30/201 1 

Federated Capital Reserve MM Account -TROW - 6/30/201 1 

TDBN Cash Checking acct 6/30/201 1 



0.00 



0.00 
0.00 



0.00 
0.00 

0.00 



$224,020.81 

$0.00 

$224,020.81 

$47,115.16 

$11,932.50 

$0.00 



Total 

Gain/(Lo««l 
0.00 



TOTAL VALUE OF ASSETS - 6/3072O11 



$283,068.47 



6 

125 



3:11 PM 
7/19/2011 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 
ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS 

STATEMENT FOR TWELVE MONTHS ENDING: June 30, 2011 
SCHOLARSHIPS AND SPECIAL FUNDS 



DONAND DUNN FUND 

H.W.& M.P.BARNARD 

J.W.BARNARD 

ALICE M.BELL 

THOMAS BLACK 

EDNA G.CHAPIN 

FRED W.DOYLE 

WARREN F. DRAPER 

WILLIAM G.GOLDSMITH 

ELIZABETH T.GUTTERSON 

MYRON E.GUTTERSON 
ANDOVER GRANGE 
NATHAN C. HAMBLIN 
MARGARET F. HINCHCLIFFE 
PUNCHARD TRUSTEES 
ANDOVER SERVICEMEN 
HENRY WYATT 
A.F.B. & W.A. TROW 
to be apportioned in on 30jun201 1 
Retained earnings 
Roundoff error 



(A) 







Trow 


Apportioned 


Scholarships 






Misc 


Income 


Net Income 


to be Awarded 


Balance as of 


* Beginning 


Additions 


1-JUI-2010 


1-Jul-2010 


June 2011 


30Jun11 AFTER 


BALANCE 


to 


thru 


thru 


•tpnvcMd -4/25/2011 


additions and 


1-Jul-2010 


Principal 


30-Jun-201 1 


30-Jun-2011 




deductions 






to bo oddod *t end of year 

$444.30 




on 30Jun201 1 


$18,859.67 


$0.00 


$19,303.97 


$1,405.88 


$0.00 




$33.12 




$1,439.00 


$8,699.09 


$0.00 




$204.93 




$8,904.02 


$1,479.25 


$0.00 




$34.85 




$1,514.10 


$15,705.96 


$0.00 




$370.00 


$1,000.00 


$15,075.98 


$3,305.25 


$0.00 




$77.87 




$3,383.12 


$10,536.08 


$0.00 




$248.21 


$1,000.00 


$9,784.29 


$2,165.00 


$0.00 




$51.00 




$2,216.00 


$3,754.70 


$0.00 




$88.45 




$3,843.15 


$1,518.02 


$0.00 




$35.76 




$1,553.78 


$2,065.58 


$0.00 




$48.66 




$2,114.24 


$3,678.82 


$0.00 




$86.67 




$3,765.49 


$20,148.71 


$0.00 




$474.66 


$1,000.00 


$19,623.37 


$34,641.17 


$0.00 




SB1608 


$1,000.00 


$34,457.25 


$11,356.68 


$0.00 




$267.54 




$11,624.22 


$30,595.62 


$0.00 




$720.77 


$1,000.00 


$30,316.39 


$20,908.73 


$0.00 




$40257 




$21,401.30 


$91,685.96 


$0.00 


$3,087.87 




$2,000.00 


$92,773.83 


-$25.01 










-$25.01 


$282,485.16 


$0.00 




$4,495.44 


$7,000.00 


$283,068.47 



* The amounts shown lor each scholarship fund am actual as of01Jul2010. 

(A) $946.00 was added in to the Wyatt fund as of 27Aug201 $1 9962.73+$946.00=$20908.73 



SUMMARY-JNCOME/(EXPENSE)01Jul10-30Jun11 

Gross Income - Scholarship Fund 
Interest Income - Broker MM 
Dividend Income - Securities/MF 
Capital Gain Distributions - MF 
Gain/(Loss) on Sale of Securities 
Misc inc check error/return 



$0.20 
$5,418.73 
$0.00 
$0.00 
$0.00 



Expenses - Scholarship Fund 
Maintenance fee - Broker/MM for period 01Jul10-30Jun11 
Brokerage fees 

Net Income - Scholarship Fund 

0.023558017 
Apportion factor 



$0.00 
$923.49 



$4,495.44 <obeMwtonM30jun2Ul1 



Gross Income - Trow Fund 
Interest Inc Broker MM - Trow 
Div Inc MF - Trow 
Capital Gain Distrib - Trow 
Gain/Loss on Sale of Securities 

Gross Expanses - Trow Fund 
Maintenance fee - Trow for period 01Jul1O-30Jun11 
Brokerage fees 

Net Income - Trow Fund 



Total Net Income - 01Jul10-30Jun11 

Scholarships Awarded June 2011 

see above 



$0.05 

$3,552.15 

$0.00 

$0.00 

$0.00 
$464.33 



$3,087.87 U> be Wded ttrtOt, to Tro» 
fund30Jun2011 



$7,583.31 
$7,000.00 



Summer 2010 Golf Tournament 
Summer 2010 Golf Tournament 



Gross Income - H.P.Wyatt Fund 
Expenses - H. P. Wyatt Fund 

Net Income - H.P.Wyatt Fund 



$946.00 
$0.00 



$946.00 

to bo >IW cire*y to H P WyM fund 

dona 27Aug2010 



3:14 PM 
7/19/2011 



126 



TRUSTEES OF PUNCHARD FREE SCHOOL 



SCHOLARSHIP and TROW FUNDS 



VALUE of FUNDS 

6/30/2011 



TD BANKNORTH CHECKING ACCT. 

FEDERATED CAPITAL RES. MONEY MARKET FUND 

1 166.74 ShB Templeton Growth Fund (sold 10/9/08) 

5779.990 Shs Franklin US Gov Securities CIA (bought in 2 lots 10/9/08 &10/14/08) 

2,578.907 Shs. AMERICAN BALANCED FUND Class A 

885,319 Shs. CAPITAL INCOME BUILDER FUND (sold 452.080 shs 10/14/08 

14,529.012 Shs. FRANKLIN INCOME FUND Class A 

Total - Individual Scholarship Funds 

FED. CAP. RES. MONEY MARKET/ TROW FUND 

561.590 Shs Pioneer Cullen Value Fund (sold 561.590 shs 10/14/08) 

758.494 Shs. PIONEER EQUITY INCOME/TROW FUND Class A 

1325.311 Shs Franklin US Gov Securities CI A (bought 10/14/08) 

828.272 Shs Income Fund of America CI F-1 

4,100,601 Shs. PIONEER HIGH YIELD/ TROW FUND Class A 

Total - Trow Scholarship Funds 

RESERVE FOR LOWER OF COST/MARKET 

Total value of funds held (3OJun201 1) 



Book Vslue (BV) Book Value (BV) 
Uul-2010 30-Jun-2011 



Market Value (MV) 
30-Jun-201 1 



$0.00 


$0.00 


$46,545.99 

$0.00 
$37,221.14 
$47,329.79 
$22,766.70 
$36,100.00 


$47,115.16 

$0.00 
$37,221.14 
$47,329.79 
$22,766.70 
$36,100.00 


$189,963.62 


$190,532.79 


$10,972.36 
$0.00 
$20,068.18 
$8,535.00 
$15,000.00 
$37,000.00 


$11,932.50 

$0.00 

$20,068.18 

$8,535.00 

$15,000.00 

$37,000.00 


$91,575.54 


$92,535.68 


$0.00 


$0.00 


======= === 


===== 


$281,539.16 


S283.068.47 



$0.00 

$47,115.16 
$0.00 
$39,475.21 
$48,122.41 
$22,411.45 
$32,544.99 

$189,669.22 

$11,932.50 

$20,797.91 

$9,051.87 

$14,254.56 

$43,015.30 

$99,052.14 

$0.00 

$288,721.36 



3:16 PM 
7/19/2011 



127 



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128 



; QUESTION 1 

YES 

NO 

TOTALS 



ELECTION RESULTS FOR SPECIAL TOWN ELECTION ANDOVER MA 1/25/2011 
PREC 1 PREC 2 PREC 3 PREC 4 PREC 5 PREC 6 PREC 7 PREC 8 PREC 9 TOTALS 



318 


160 


212 


142 


149 


187 


159 


449 


219 


1995 


97 


124 


142 


125 


140 


106 


139 


154 


141 


1168 


415 


284 


354 


267 


289 


293 


298 


603 


360 


3163 



QUESTION 1 

Shall the Town of Andover be allowed to exempt from the provisions of proposition two-and-one- half, 
so called, the amounts required to pay for the bonds issued in order to pay costs of constructing a new 
Bancroft School on Bancroft Road, including the payment of related offsite improvements, and all other 
costs incidental and related thereto? 



129 



ELECTION RESULTS FOR ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION ANDOVER MASSACHUSETTS 3/22/2011 

PCT. 1 PCT. 2 PCT. 3 PCT. 4 PCT. 5 PCT. 6 PCT. 7 PCT. 8 PCT. 9 Totals 
MODERATOR - 1 YEAR TERM (1) 



SHEILA M DOHERTY 


190 


148 


157 


150 


143 


144 


185 


226 


196 


1539 


Blanks 


51 


40 


59 


38 


41 


31 


72 


74 


59 


465 


Misc. Others 


2 





2 


1 


1 





2 


4 


3 


15 


Totals 


243 


188 


218 


189 


185 


175 


259 


304 


258 


2019 


BOARD OF SELECTMEN-3 YEAR TERM (1] 


1 
















MARY KELVIE LYMAN 


193 


137 


158 


126 


133 


127 


178 


220 


183 


1455 


Blanks 


49 


48 


56 


60 


51 


46 


79 


81 


74 


544 


Misc. Others 


1 


3 


4 


3 


1 


2 


2 


3 


1 


20 


Totals 


243 


188 


218 


189 


185 


175 


259 


304 


258 


2019 


BOARD OF SELECTMEN 


- 2 YEAR TERM (1) 
















LARRY BRUCE 


21 


37 


38 


27 


40 


14 


21 


38 


24 


260 


DANIEL H. KOWALSKI 


85 


55 


66 


62 


55 


57 


133 


105 


93 


711 


PAUL J. SALAFIA 


117 


87 


100 


90 


82 


95 


101 


140 


123 


935 


Blanks 


19 


9 


14 


10 


8 


9 


3 


20 


18 


110 


Misc. Others 


1 

















1 


1 





3 


Totals 


243 


188 


218 


189 


185 


175 


259 


304 


258 


2019 


SCHOOL COMMITTEE - 


3 YEAR TERM (1) 


















DENNIS F. FORGUE 


94 


95 


109 


114 


80 


94 


143 


153 


153 


1035 


DONALD H. GOTTFRIED 


146 


82 


103 


70 


95 


73 


105 


142 


96 


912 


Blanks 


3 


11 


6 


5 


10 


8 


11 


9 


9 


72 


Misc. Others 
































Totals 


243 


188 


218 


189 


185 


175 


259 


304 


258 


2019 


HOUSING AUTHORITY 


- 5 YEAR TERM (1) 
















DANIEL T. GRAMS 


187 


135 


159 


131 


133 


132 


177 


216 


191 


1461 


Blanks 


56 


53 


59 


57 


52 


43 


82 


88 


67 


557 


Misc. Others 











1 

















1 


Totals 


243 


188 


218 


189 


185 


175 


259 


304 


258 


2019 



130 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 27, 28, 2011 



WARRANT 


ACTION 


ARTICLE NO. & DESCRIPTION 


TAKEN 


1. 


Election Results 


Reported 


2. 


Election - Not Required by Ballot 


Election 


3. 


Salaries of Elected Officials 


Approval 


4. 


FY-2012 Budget - $134,827,279 


Approval 


5. 


Capital Projects Fund FY-2012 
- Appropriation $1,246,000 


Approval 


6. 


Budget Transfers - $180,000 


Approval 


7. 


Supplemental Budget Appropriations 
- $620,000 


Approval 


8. 


Free Cash 


Withdrawn 


9. 


Unexpended Appropriations 


Withdrawn 


10. 


General Housekeeping, A through G 

A. Grant Program Authorization 

B. Road Contracts 

C. Town Report 

D. Property Tax Exemptions 

- Statute Acceptance 

E. Contracts in Excess of Three Years 

F. Accepting Easements 

G. Rescinding Bond Authorizations 


Approved 


11. 


Granting Easements 


Approved 


12. 


Unpaid Bills 


Withdrawn 


13. 


Chapter 90 Authorizations 


Approved 


14. 


Revolving Accounts 


Approved 


15. 


Transfer from Overlay Surplus 
-$342,911.97 


Approved 



ATTY. GENERAL 
APPROVED 



16. School Building Maintenance 
and Renovation - $925,000 



Approved 



131 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 27, 28, 2011 



WARRANT 

ARTICLE NO. & DESCRIPTION 


ACTION 
TAKEN 


ATTY. GENERAL 
APPROVED 


17. West Middle School Green Repairs 
-$1,540,407 


Approved 




18. Municipal Services Facility 
- $35,000 


Approved 




19. Conservation Land Acquisition Fund 


Withdrawn 




20. Grant Application for Fosters Pond 
Conservation Land 


Withdrawn 





2 1 . Renewable Energy Facilities - 

Feasibility Study for Municipal Land 
- $25,000 



Approved 



22. 


Long-term Renewable Energy Contracts 


Approved 


23. 


DPW Vehicles 
- $300,000 


Approved 


24. 


Town Bridge Evaluation and Repairs 
-$100,000 


Approved 


25. 


Pearson Street Parking Lot 
- $85,000 


Approved 


26. 


High Plain Road at Fish Brook 
Design and Engineering 
- $75,000 


Approved 


27. 


Jerry Silverman Fireworks 
-$12,000 


Approved 


28. 


Elderly/Disabled Transportation Program 
-$12,000 


Approved 


29. 


Insurance Recovery Transfer 


Withdrawn 


30. 


Funding OPEB Trust Fund 


Approved 



$400,000 



3 1 . Zoning By-law Amendment - Off 
Street Parking Requirements 



Approved 



May 11,2011 



132 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 27, 28, 2011 



WARRANT 

ARTICLE NO. & DESCRIPTION 

32. Street Acceptance - Winterberry Lane 

33. Storm Drain Improvements 
- $300,000 

34. Town Building Maintenance and 
Renovation 

35. Zoning By-law Amendment - 
Dimensional Special Permit/Historic 
Preservation 



36. 

37. 
38. 

39. 

40. 

41. 

42. 

43. 

44. 

45. 

46. 



Balmoral Fence & Masonry Repairs 

Parking Meter Replacement 

Spring Grove Cemetery Maintenance 
-$31,000 

Zoning By-law Amendment - OSRD 
Special Permit 

Zoning By-law Amendment - River 
Road Business Overlay District 

General By-law Amendment - Banners 
In General Business District 



ACTION 


ATTY. GENERAL 


TAKEN 


APPROVED 


Approved 




Approved 





Approved 
Defeated 

Withdraw 

Withdrawn 

Approved 

Defeated 

Withdrawn 

Approved 



Water Distribution Systems Improvements Approved 
- $500,000 



Water & Sewer Vehicles 
- $70,000 



Approved 



WTP Variable Frequency Drive Pump Approved 

- $499,099.95 



Acceptance Chapter 131, Sections 
27 & 28 of the Acts of 2010 

General By-law Amendment - Bow 
Hunting Ban 



Approved 
Defeated 



May 11,2011 



133 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 27, 28, 2011 



47. Zoning By-law Amendment - Political Approved May 1 1 , 201 1 

Signs 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING WARRANT 

Agreeably to a Warrant signed by the Selectmen on March 21, 201 1, to notify and warn the 
Inhabitants of said Town who are qualified to vote in Town Affairs to meet and assemble at the 
Richard J. Collins Field House, Andover High School, Shawsheen Road, in said Andover, on 

WEDNESDAY, THE TWENTY-SEVENTH DAY OF APRIL, 2011 

at seven o'clock P.M. to act upon the following articles: 

Pursuant to the foregoing Warrant, I the subscriber, one of the Constables of the Town of 
Andover, have notified the Inhabitants of said Town to meet at the time and place and for the 
purposes stated in said Warrant, by posting a true and attested copy of the same on the Town 
Hall, on each school house and in no less than five other public places where bills and notices are 
usually posted and by publication in the Andover Townsman. Said Warrants have been posted 
and published fourteen days. 

Ronald Bertheim, Constable 

April 6, 2011 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING APRIL 27, 2011 

The check lists were used at the entrance and four hundred and sixty seven (467) voters admitted 
to the meeting on the first night of the meeting. 

Sheila M. Doherty, Moderator, called the meeting to order at 7:00 P.M. 

The American Legion Post 8 presented the Colors. 

The Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag was led by Alex J. Vispoli, Chair of the Board of 
Selectmen. 

The Song "America," written by Samuel Francis Smith in Andover was sung by Andover 
resident Meghan Burke. 

The Colors were posted. 

The opening prayer was giving by the Reverend Jeffrey Gill, Christ Church, Andover. 

There was a moment of silence for the deceased that have worked and lived in the Town. 



134 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 27, 28, 2011 



Upon majority consent it was VOTED to admit non- voters to the meeting and escort non- voters 
to the non-voting section thereafter. Seventy-five (75) non-voters were admitted during the first 
night of the meeting. 

The Moderator announced various housekeeping issues to the meeting members, including 
turning off cell phones, no smoking, food or drinks (except water) in the Field House. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED by majority consent to dispense with the 
reading of the Warrant and return of service of the Constable and to refer to the Warrant Articles 
by number and subject matter. 

The Moderator announced the voting sections of the Hall. 

The Moderator introduced the stage participants to meeting members. 

The Moderator introduced Atty. Christopher Vrountas as the Town Meeting "Ombudsman", and 
reminded meeting members that he would help them with questions on Town Meeting 
procedures and amendments to articles. 

The Moderator outlined the Rules and Procedures of Town meeting to the Members, including 
that voters must be seated to be counted and must have their voter stickers visible and the use of 
Pro and Con microphones during the meeting. 

The Moderator took a vote to limit presenters of articles to five minutes of speaking time and 
speakers to three minutes. The motion passed by a majority vote. 



ARTICLE 1. To elect a Moderator for one year, one Selectman for three years, one Selectman 
for two years, one School Committee member for three years and one member of the Andover 
Housing Authority for five years. 

The Town Clerk reported the following were elected and duly sworn to office: 

Moderator One For One Year 



Board of Selectmen 



One For Three Years 



Sheila M. Doherty 
9 Juniper Road 

Mary Kelvie Lyman 
50 School Street 



Board of Selectmen 



School Committee 



One For Two Years 



One For Three Years 



Paul J. Salafia 

283 So. Main Street 

Dennis F. Forgue 

1 8 Reservation Road 



Andover Housing Authority 



One For Five Years 



Daniel T. Grams 
28 Corbett Street 



135 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 27, 28, 2011 



Election Not Required by Ballot 

ARTICLE 2. To elect all other officers not required by law to be elected by ballot, or take any 
other action related there. 

On request of the Town Clerk 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a majority vote that Richard J. 
Bowen, 12 Bannister Road, be elected Trustee of the Cornell Fund for three years. 



Salaries of Elected Officials 

ARTICLE 3. To establish the salaries of the elected officers for the ensuing year, or take any 
other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Clerk 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that the salaries of the 
elected Town Officers be established as follows: 

Town Moderator - $250.00 for each Annual Town Meeting and $60.00 for each 

Special Town Meeting except when it falls within the Annual 

Town Meeting. 
Selectmen - Chairman - $ 1 ,800.00 

Members- $1,500.00 
School Committee - Chairman - $ 1 ,800.00 

Members- $1,500.00 

The Moderator's salary was moved by Selectmen Major, the Town Clerk presided over the vote 
for the Moderator's salary. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

FY-2012 Budget 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to determine what sums of money the Town will 
raise and appropriate, including appropriations from available funds, to defray charges and 
expenses of the Town, including debt and interest, and to provide for a reserve fund for the 
Fiscal Year beginning July 1, 2011 and ending June 30, 2012, or take any other action related 
thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 



136 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 27, 28, 2011 



ARTICLE 4-2011 ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
FY 2012 Budget 
LINE 
ITEM DEPARTMENT APPROVED FY 2012 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate the following sums of money for 
PUBLIC SAFETY by a Majority Vote: 
PUBLIC SAFETY 

1 PERSONAL SERVICES 12,956,728 

2 OTHER EXPENSES 1,305,360 
TOTAL 14,262,088 

Includes $287,264 - parking receipts, $70,000 - detail fees, and $1,000,000 - ambulance collections 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Selectman Report: Approval 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate the following sums of money for 
GENERAL GOVERNMENT & COMMUNITY DELEOPMENT by a Majority Vote: 
GENERAL GOVERNMENT & COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT 

3 PERSONAL SERVICES 5,370,989 

4 OTHER EXPENSES 1,540,301 
TOTAL 6,911,290 

Includes $24,000 in receipts from wetland filing fees and $27,044 
water reserves and $27,044 sewer reserves. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Selectman Report: Approval 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate the following sums of money for 
PUBLIC WORKS by a Majority Vote: 
PUBLIC WORKS 

5 PERSONAL SERVICES 1,663,249 

6 OTHER EXPENSES 3,682,302 
TOTAL 5,345,551 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Selectman Report: Approval 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate the following sums of money for 
PLANT AND FACILITIES by a Maj ority Vote: 
PLANT AND FACILITIES 

7 PERSONAL SERVICES 3,110,159 

8 OTHER EXPENSES 1,342.341 



137 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 27, 28, 2011 



TOTAL 4,452,500 

Includes $68,475 in rental receipts; $60,000 cemetery fees. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Selectman Report: Approval 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate the following sums of money for 
LIBRARY by a Majority Vote: 
LIBRARY 

9 PERSONAL SERVICES 1,833,122 

10 OTHER EXPENSES 593,900 
TOTAL 2,427,022 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Selectman Report: Approval 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate the following sums of money for 
COMMUNITY/YOUTH SERVICES/ELDER SERVICES by a Majority Vote: 
COMMUNITY / YOUTH/ ELDER SERVICES 

1 1 PERSONAL SERVICES 1 ,2 1 6,3 8 1 

12 OTHER EXPENSES 444,479 
TOTAL 1,660,860 

Includes $550,000 and $55,000 in user fees and $69,300 in grants 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Selectman Report: Approval 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate the following sums of money for 
UNCLASSIFIED EXPENSES by a Majority Vote: 
UNCLASSIFIED EXPENSES 

13 COMPENSATION FUND 250,000 

14 RESERVE FUND 200,000 
TOTAL 450,000 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Selectman Report: Approval 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate the following sums of money for 
ANDOVER SCHOOL DEPT. by a Majority Vote: 
ANDOVER SCHOOL DEPT. 

15 PERSONAL SERVICES 49,176,074 

16 OTHER EXPENSES 13,608,503 



138 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 27, 28, 2011 



TOTAL 62,784,577 



Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Selectman Report: Approval 
School Committee Report: Approval 



Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate the following sums of money for 
SEWER by a Majority Vote: 
SEWER 

17 PERSONAL SERVICES 416,740 

18 OTHER EXPENSES 2,075,955 

TOTAL 2,492,695 

Includes $360,000 in sewer reserves 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Selectman Report: Approval 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate the following sums of money for 
WATER by a Majority Vote: 

WATER 

19 PERSONAL SERVICES 1,591,548 

20 OTHER EXPENSES 2,288,400 
TOTAL 3,879,948 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Selectman Report: Approval 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate the following sums of money for 
GREATER LAWRENCE TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL by a Majority Vote: 

2 1 GREATER LAWRENCE TECHNICAL H. S . 444,503 
TOTAL 444,503 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Selectman Report: Approval 

Upon Motion made and duly seconded, it was voted to raise and appropriate the following sums of money for 
FIXED EXPENSES by a Majority Vote: 
FIXED EXPENSES 

22 DEBT SERVICE 12,112,692 

23 GENERAL INSURANCE 661,613 

24 UNEMPLOYMENT COMP. 100,000 

25 RETIREMENT FUND 5,085,067 

139 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 27, 28, 2011 



26 HEALTH INSURANCE FUND 

TOTAL 



14,355,000 
32,314,372 



Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Selectman Report: Approval 



GRAND TOTAL 
less budgeted Revenues 
NET TOTAL 



137,425,406 
(2,598,127) 
134,827,279 



2011 ANNUAL TOWN MEETING SPECIAL ARTICLES 



SPECIAL ARTICLES FROM FREE CASH 



Article 7 



Article 18 
Article 21 
Article 27 
Article 30 



Supplemental Appropriations - FY 201 1 : 

FY 201 1 Public Works - Other Expenses 

FY 20 1 1 Health Insurance 

Municipal Services Facility 

Renewable Energy Facilities - Feasibility Study 

Jerry Silverman Fireworks 

Other Post Employment Benefit Trust Fund 

TOTAL 



$500,000.00 
$120,000.00 
$ 35,000.00 
$ 25,000.00 
$ 12,000.00 
$300,000.00 
$992,000.00 



SPECIAL ARTICLES - TRANSFER OF FUNDS 



Article 6 From Article 4, 20 1 ATM - FY 20 1 1 Debt Service 

To FY 201 1 Health Insurance 
Article 17 From Article 41 , 201 ATM School Building 

Maintenance & Renovation to West Middle School 

Green Repair 
Article 38 From Spring Grove Cemetery Perpetual Care 

To Spring Grove Cemetery Maintenance & Roads 
Article 44 For Variable Frequency Drive Pump 

From Article 34, 2005 Water Plant Improvements 

From Article 41, 2005 Fish Brook Pumping Station 

From Article 55, 2005 Salt Study 

From Article 35, 2007 Water Vehicle Replacement 

From Article 54, 2007 Salt Balance Study 

From Article 12, 2008 Fish Brook Pumping Station 



$180,000.00 

$290,407.00 
$ 31,000.00 



1,657.66 

16,173.89 

756.88 

164.65 

14,576.42 

25,770.45 



TOTAL 



$ 560,506.95 



140 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 27, 28, 2011 



RESCIND BOND AUTHORIZATIONS 



Article 10G Article 48, 2002 ATM Main Street Improvements 
Article 34, 2005 ATM Water Treatment Plant Imp. 
Article 2A, 2004 STM South Main Area Sewers 

TOTAL 



$ 500.00 

$ 648.00 

$1,000,000.00 
$1,001,148.00 



SPECIAL ARTICLES - GENERAL FUND BORROWING 



Article 16 School Maintenance & Renovation 

Article 17 West Middle School Green Repair Program 

Article 23 DPW Vehicles 

Article 24 Town Bridge Evaluation & Repairs 

Article 25 Pearson Street Parking Lot 

Article 26 High Plain Road at Fish Brook Design & Eng. 

Article 33 Storm Drain Improvements 

Article 34 Town Building Maintenance & Renovation 

TOTAL 



$ 925,000.00 
$1,250,000.00 
$ 300,000.00 
$ 100,000.00 
$ 85,000.00 
$ 75,000.00 
$ 300,000.00 
$ 500,000.00 
$3,535,000.00 



SPECIAL ARTICLES - WATER/SEWER FUND BORROWING 

Article 42 Water Distribution Systems Improvements $ 500,000.00 

Article 44 Water Treat. Plant Variable Frequency Drive Pump $ 440,000.00 

TOTAL $ 940,000.00 

UNEXPENDED APPROPRIATIONS 

NONE 

SPECIAL ARTICLES - CHAPTER 44 SEC. 53 Vi REVOLVING ACCOUNTS 



Article 14A Community Development & Planning Department 

Article 14B Memorial Hall Library - Lost/Damaged Materials 

Article 14C Health Clinic 

Article 14D Division of Community Services 

Article 14E Division of Youth Services 

Article 14F Field Maintenance 

Article 14G Division of Elder Services 

Article 14H Police Communications 

Article 141 Memorial Hall Library Audio /Visual 

Article 14 J School Photocopy Fees 

Article 14K Compost Program 

Article 14L Solid Waste 

Article 14M Storm water Management 

Article 14N Fire Rescue 



30,000.00 

20,000.00 

40,000.00 

625,000.00 

400,000.00 

100,000.00 

200,000.00 

50,000.00 

40,000.00 

20,000.00 

60,000.00 

40,000.00 

30,000.00 

200,000.00 



141 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 27, 28, 2011 

TOTAL $1,855,000.00 

SPECIAL ARTICLES FROM TAXATION 

Article 5 Capital Projects Fund FY20 12 $1,246,000.00 

Article 28 Elderly/Disabled Transportation Program $ 12,000.00 

TOTAL $1,258,000.00 

SPECIAL ARTICLES FROM WATER RESERVES 

Article 30 Other Post Employment Benefit Trust Fund $ 100,000.00 

Article 43 Water Vehicles $ 35,000.00 

TOTAL $ 135,000.00 

SPECIAL ARTICLES FROM SEWER RESERVES 

Article 43 Sewer Vehicles $ 35,000.00 

TOTAL $ 35,000.00 

SPECIAL ARTICLES FROM OVERLAY SURPLUS 

Article 15 From Overlay Surplus 

To Allowance for Abatements & Exemptions Account: 

FY2010 $ 242,911.97 

FY2011 $ 100,000.00 

TOTAL $ 342,911.97 

SPECIAL ARTICLES FROM PARKING RECEIPTS 

NONE 



A true record 
ATTEST 



Lawrence J. Murphy 
Town Clerk 



142 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 27, 28, 2011 



FY-2011 Capital Projects Fund Appropriation 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of 
$1,963,000 for the purpose of funding the Fiscal Year 2012 appropriation for the Capital Projects 
Fund or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote to raise by taxation and 
appropriate the sum of $1,246,000 for the purpose of funding the Fiscal Year 2012 appropriation 
for the Capital Projects Fund. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
School Committee Report: Approval 

Budget Transfers 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from amounts previously appropriated at 
the 2010 Annual Town Meeting as authorized by MGL Chapter 44, Section 33B, or take any 
other action related thereto. 

On request of the Finance Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote to transfer funds from 
the following 2010 Annual Town Meeting- Article 4 appropriations: 

$ 180,000 from FY 201 1 Debt Service 

And appropriate the sum of $180,000 for FY 201 1 Health Insurance 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Supplemental Budget Appropriations 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds a sum of money to 
supplement appropriations voted at the April 2010 Annual Town Meeting , or take any other 
action related thereto. 

On request of the Finance Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote to transfer $620,000 
from Free Cash and appropriate a sum of $500,000 to FY201 1 Public Works - Other Expenses 
and $120,000 to FY201 1 Health Insurance. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 

143 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 27, 28, 2011 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Free Cash 

ARTICLE 8. To see what amount the Town will vote to permit the Assessors to use in free cash 
to reduce the Fiscal Year 2012 tax rate and to affect appropriations voted at the 2011 Annual 
Town Meeting, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Finance Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted by a Majority vote that Article 8 be 
WITHDRAWN from the Warrant. 

Unexpended Appropriations 

ARTICLE 9. To see what disposition shall be made of unexpended appropriations and free cash 
in the treasury, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Finance Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted by a Majority vote that Article 9 be 
WITHDRAWN from the Warrant. 

General Housekeeping Articles 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote the following consent articles, or take any other 
action related thereto: 

A. Grant Program Authorization 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen and/or the Town 
Manager to apply for, accept and enter into contracts from time to time for the expenditure of 
any funds allotted to Andover by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts or the U. S. Government 
under any State or Federal grant program, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

B. Road Contracts 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Manager to enter into a contract with 
the Massachusetts Highway Department Commissioners or the Federal Government for the 
construction and maintenance of public highways in the Town of Andover for the ensuing year, 
or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 



144 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 27, 28, 2011 

C. Town Report 

To act upon the report of the Town officers, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

D. Property Tax Exemptions 

To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Section 4, Chapter 73 of the Acts 
of 1986 as amended by Chapter 126 of the Acts of 1988 to allow an additional property tax 
exemption for Fiscal Year 2012 for those persons who qualify for property tax exemptions under 
Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 59, Section 5, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Board of Assessors 

E. Contracts in Excess of Three Years 

To see if the Town will vote in accordance with the provisions of Massachusetts General 
Laws Chapter 30B, Section 12(b), to authorize the Town Manager or the Superintendent of 
Schools to solicit and award contracts for terms exceeding three years but no greater than five 
years, including any renewal, extension or option, provided in each instance the longer term is 
determined to be in the best interest of the Town by a vote of the Board of Selectmen or the 
School Committee, as appropriate, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

F. Accepting Easements 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen and the School 
Committee to accept grants of easements for streets, water, drainage, sewer and utility purposes 
or any public purpose on terms and conditions the Board and the Committee deem in the best 
interests of the Town, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

G. Rescinding of Bond Authorizations 

To see if the Town will vote to rescind unissued bond authorizations from prior Town 
Meetings, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Finance Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote to approve the consent 
agenda, Articles 10A through 10F. 



145 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 27, 28, 2011 



Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted under Article 10G to rescind the following 

unissued bond authorizations: 

$500 Article 48, 2002 Annual Town Meeting Main Street Improvements 

$648 Article 34, 2005 Annual Town Meeting Water Treatment Plant 

Improvements 
$ 1 ,000,000 Article 2A, 2004 Special Town Meeting South Main Area Sewers 

Article 10G Vote: Declared a 2/3 vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 



Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Granting Easements 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen and the School 
Committee to grant easements for water, drainage, sewer and utility purposes or any public 
purpose on terms and conditions the Board and the Committee deem in the best interests of the 
Town, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted to authorize the Board of Selectmen and the 
School Committee to grant easements for water, drainage, sewer and utility purposes or any public 
purpose on terms and conditions the Board and the Committee deem in the best interests of the Town. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 Vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 



Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Unpaid Bills 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to transfer from available funds a sum of money to 
pay unpaid bills for which obligation was incurred in prior fiscal years, or take any other action 
related thereto. 

On request of the Town Accountant 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted by a Majority vote that Article 12 be 
WITHDRAWN from the Warrant. 



146 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 27, 28, 2011 



Chapter 90 Authorizations 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town to acquire any necessary 
easements by gift, by purchase or by right of eminent domain for Chapter 90 Highway 
Construction or any other federal or state aid program for road or sidewalk improvements, or 
take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to authorize the Town to acquire any 
necessary easements by gift, by purchase or by right of eminent domain for Chapter 90 Highway 
Construction or any other federal or state aid program for road or sidewalk improvements. 



VOTE: 



Declared more than a 2/3 Vote by the Moderator 



A 2/3 vote required 



Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Revolving Accounts 

ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the following revolving funds for 
certain Town departments under Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 53E1/2 for 
the fiscal year beginning July 1, 201 1, or take any other action related thereto: 



Revolving Fund 


Authorized to Spend 


Use of Fund 


Revenue Source 


FY-20 12 Limit 


A. Community 
Development & 
Planning 
Department 


Division Heads 


Advertising legal 
hearing notice 
expenses for permit 
applications 


Applicant Fees 


$30,000 


B. Memorial Hall 
Library- 
Lost/Damaged 
Materials 


MHL Director 


Replacement of 
lost/damaged library 
materials 


Restitution 
payments /charges 
to borrower or 
_patron 


$20,000 


C. Health Clinic 


Public Health 
Director 


Clinic supplies and 
other expenses 


Clinic participant 
fees 


$40,000 


D. Division of 

Community 

Services 


Community 
Services Director 


Trips, ticket sales 
and special 
programs and 
activities 


Participant fees 


$625,000 


E. Division of 
Youth Services 


Youth Services 
Director 


All programs and 
activities expenses, 
part-time help 


Participant fees 


$400,000 


F. Field 
Maintenance 


Plant and Facilities 
Director 


Field maintenance, 
upgrade and related 
expenses 


Field rental fees 


$100,000 


G. Division of 
Elder Services 


Elder Services 
Director 


Senior programs, 
classes and activities 


Participant fees 


$200,000 



147 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 27, 28, 2011 



H. Police 


Chief of Police 


Maintenance and 


Lease agreements 


$50,000 


Communications 




purchase of public 
safety radio and 
antennae equipment 


for antenna users 




I. Memorial Hall 


MHL Director 


Purchase of 


Rental of 


$40,000 


Library 




audio/visual 


audio/visual 




Audio/Visual 




materials 


materials 




J. School Photocopy 


School Dept. 


Photocopy Center 


External Private 


$20,000 


Fees 




Costs 


Groups 




K. Compost 


Plant & Facilities 


Offset Compost 


Contractor permit 


$60,000 


Program 


Director 


Monitoring and 
Cleanup Expenses 


fees, revenues from 
sale of compost 




L. Solid Waste 


Public Works 


Offset Trash & 


CRT, HHW & 


$40,000 




Director 


Recycling Costs 


Trash fees 




M. Stormwater 


Planning Director 


Consulting and 


Applicant 


$30,000 


Management 




Environmental 
Monitoring of 
Stormwater 
Management 
Applications and 
Permits 






N. Fire Rescue 


Fire Chief 


Training and 
Equipment 


Service Fees 


$200,000 



On request of the Finance Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted by a Majority vote that Article 14 A through 
N - Revolving Accounts, be approved as printed in the Warrant. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Transfer from Overlay Surplus 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to transfer a sum of money from Overlay Surplus 
and appropriate to various fiscal years Allowance for Abatements and Exemptions accounts, or 
take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Finance Director 

Upon motion duly made and seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote to transfer the sum of 
$342,91 1.97 from Overlay Surplus and appropriate to the following fiscal years Allowance for 
Abatements and Exemptions Accounts: FY 20 1 0: $242,9 1 1 .97 

FY 2011: $100,000.00 



Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 



148 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 27, 28, 2011 



School Building Maintenance and Renovation 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, borrowing, or transfer from 
available funds or by any combination and appropriate the sum of $925,000 for the purpose of 
paying costs of constructing, adding to, remodeling, reconstructing and making extraordinary 
repairs to and equipping various School buildings and roofs and for the payment of all other 
costs incidental and related thereto, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Acting Plant and Facilities Director 

Upon motion duly made and seconded it was VOTED that $925,000 is appropriated to pay costs 
of constructing, adding to, remodeling, reconstructing and making extraordinary repairs to and 
equipping various School buildings and roofs, including the payment of any and all costs 
incidental and related thereto, and that to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Board of Selectmen, is authorized to borrow such amount under and pursuant to 
Chapter 44, Section 7(3 A) of the General Laws, or pursuant to any other enabling authority and 
to issue bonds and notes of the Town therefor. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 Vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
School Committee Report: Approval 

West Middle School Green Repair Program 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate, borrow or transfer from available 
funds, a sum of money to be expended under the direction of the Town Manager for the 
replacement of the roof and windows of the West Middle School building located at 70 
Shawsheen Road, Andover, MA and as shown on Andover Assessor's Map 72, Lot 54. The 
proposed repair project would materially extend the useful life of the school and preserve an 
asset that otherwise is capable of supporting the required educational facility and for which the 
Town may be eligible for a school construction grant from the Massachusetts School Building 
Authority ("MSBA"). The MSBA's grant program is a non-entitlement, discretionary program 
based on need, as determined by the MSBA, and any project costs the Town incurs in excess of 
any grant approved by and received from the MSBA shall be the sole responsibility of the Town. 
Any grant that the Town may receive from the MSBA for the Project shall not exceed the lesser 
of (1) 39 percent (39%) of eligible, approved project costs, as determined by the MSBA, or (2) 
the total maximum grant amount determined by the MSBA. 

On request of the Acting Plant & Facilities Director 

Upon motion duly made and seconded it was VOTED that the Town appropriate the sum of one 
million, five hundred forty thousand four hundred and seven ($1,540,407) dollars for the Roof 
Replacement and Window Replacement Project for the West Middle School at 70 Shawsheen 
Road, Andover, MA. The proposed repair project would materially extend the useful life of the 



149 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 27, 28, 2011 



school and preserve an asset that otherwise is capable of supporting the required educational 
program, said sum to be expended under the direction of the Town Manager and to meet said 
appropriation the Town Treasurer is authorized to borrow the sum of one million, two hundred 
fifty thousand ($1,250,000) under M.G.L. Chapter 44, or any other enabling authority; that the 
Town acknowledges that the Massachusetts School Building Authority's ("MSBA") grant 
program is a non-entitlement, discretionary program based on need, as determined by the MSBA, 
and any project costs the Town incurs in excess of any grant approved by and received from the 
MSBA shall be the sole responsibility of the Town; provided further that any grant that the Town 
may receive from the MSBA for the Project shall not exceed the lesser of (1) 39 percent (%) of 
eligible, approved project costs, as determined by the MSBA, or (2) the total maximum grant 
amount determined by the MSBA; and that the amount of borrowing authorized pursuant to this 
vote shall be reduced by any grant amount set forth in the Project Funding Agreement that may 
be executed between the Town and the MSBA. 

The balance of $290,407 is to be transferred from Article 41 School Building Maintenance and 
Renovation of the 2010 Annual Town Meeting. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 Vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
School Committee Report: Approval 



Municipal Services Facility 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, borrowing, or transfer from 
available funds or by any combination and appropriate the sum of $100,000 for the purpose of 
studying options for the location, development and financing of a Municipal Services Facility 
(Town Yard) and its associated programmatic space needs, or take any other action related 
thereto. 

On request of the Town Yard Task Force 

Upon motion duly made and seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote to appropriate $35,000 
from Free Cash for the purpose of studying options for the location, development and financing 
of a Municipal Services Facility (Town Yard) and its associated programmatic space needs. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 



Conservation Land Acquisition Fund 



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ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate the sum of $200,000 for the 
acquisition of 2.38 acres of land (23 Willard Circle, 0.90 acres - Map 123, Parcel 31 and 25 
Willard Circle, 1.48 acres - Map 123, Parcel 30) for conservation purposes under the provisions 
of Chapter 40, Section 8C of the Massachusetts General Laws, to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen and Conservation Commission to acquire this land by gift, purchase or eminent 
domain, and that to raise this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of 
Selectmen, is authorized to borrow said sum under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7(3) of 
the General Laws, or any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town 
therefore, or to take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Conservation Commission 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted by a Majority vote that Article 19 be 
WITHDRAWN from the Warrant. 

Grant Application for Fosters Pond Conservation Land 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Treasurer to expend up to $200,000 
from the amount appropriated by vote upon Article 19 of the 2011 Annual Town Meeting to 
acquire the land near Fosters Pond as shown on Assessors' Map 123, Parcels 23 and 25, known 
as 23 and 25 Willard Circle, for conservation and open space purposes under the care, custody 
and control of the Andover Conservation Commission under the provisions of Chapter 40, 
Section 8C of the Massachusetts General Laws, and that the Town Manager be authorized to file 
on behalf of the Town of Andover any and all applications deemed necessary under the Self- 
Help Act (Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 132A, Section 11) or any other applications for 
funds in any way connected with the scope of this acquisition; and that the Town Manager, 
Board of Selectmen and Conservation Commission be authorized to enter into all agreements 
and execute any and all instruments, including permanent deed or conservation restrictions, in 
accordance with Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 1 84, on terms and conditions they deem 
to be in the best interest of the Town and as may be necessary on behalf of the Town of Andover 
to affect said purchase, or to take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Conservation Commission 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted by a Majority vote that Article 20 be 
WITHDRAWN from the Warrant. 

Renewable Energy Facilities - Feasibility Study for Municipal Land 

ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, borrowing or transfer from 
available funds and appropriate the sum of $25,000 to conduct studies to determine the 
feasibility of locating solar energy or other renewable energy facilities on municipally owned 
properties, or take any other action related thereto. 

On the request of the Andover Green Advisory Board, 
Acting Plant & Facilities Director and the Planning Director 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 27, 28, 2011 



Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote to appropriate $25,000 
from Free Cash to conduct studies to determine the feasibility of locating solar energy or other 
renewable energy facilities on municipally owned properties. 

A standing vote was taken. The Moderator announced the motion passed by a vote of 154 in 
favor to 125 opposed. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

Long-term Renewable Electricity Contracts 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Manager to solicit and 
award contracts for purchasing electricity generated by solar energy facilities or other renewable 
resources, in accordance with the provisions of applicable Massachusetts General Laws, for 
terms exceeding three years but no greater than twenty years, including any renewal, extension 
or option, provided in each instance the longer term is determined to be in the best interest of the 
Town by a vote of the Board of Selectmen, or take any other action related thereto. 

On the request of the Acting Plant & Facilities Director and the Andover Green Advisory Board 

Upon motion duly made and seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote to authorize the Town 
Manager to solicit and award contracts for purchasing electricity generated by solar energy 
facilities or other renewable resources, in accordance with the provisions of applicable 
Massachusetts General Laws, for terms exceeding three years but no greater than twenty years, 
including any renewal, extension or option, provided in each instance the longer term is 
determined to be in the best interest of the Town by a vote of the Board of Selectmen. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

DPW Vehicles 

ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, borrowing, or transfer from 
available funds or by any combination and appropriate the sum of $300,000 for the purpose of 
purchasing Public Works vehicles, or to take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Department of Public Works 

Upon motion duly made and seconded it was VOTED that $300,000 is appropriated to pay costs 
of purchasing various Public Works vehicles, and for the payment of all costs incidental and 
related thereto, and that to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board 
of Selectmen, is authorized to borrow such amount under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 27, 28, 2011 



7(9) of the General Laws, or pursuant to any other enabling authority and to issue bonds and 
notes of the Town therefor. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 Vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 



Town Bridge Evaluation & Repairs 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, borrowing, or transfer from 
available funds or by any combination and appropriate the sum of $100,000 for the purpose of 
paying costs of bridge evaluation and repairs in the Town, or take any other action related 
thereto. 

On request of the Department of Public Works 

Upon motion duly made and seconded it was VOTED that $100,000 is appropriated to pay costs 
of engineering services necessary to evaluate bridges in Town and to pay costs of bridge repairs, 
including the payment of any and all costs incidental and related thereto, and that to meet this 
appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is authorized to 
borrow such amount under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7(4) of the General Laws, or 
pursuant to any other enabling authority and to issue bonds and notes of the Town therefor. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 Vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Pearson Street Parking Lot 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, transfer from available funds, 
borrowing or by any combination and appropriate the sum of $85,000 for the purpose of paying 
the costs of design and construction of a municipal parking lot at 16 and 18 Pearson Street, and 
for the payment of all other costs incidental and related thereto, or take any other action related 
thereto. 

On request of the Department of Public Works 

Upon motion duly made and seconded it was VOTED that $85,000 is appropriated to pay costs 
of designing and constructing a municipal parking lot, including the payment of any and all costs 
incidental and related thereto, and that to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Board of Selectmen, is authorized to borrow such amount under and pursuant to 
Chapter 44, Section 7(5) of the General Laws, or pursuant to any other enabling authority and to 
issue bonds and notes of the Town therefor. 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 27, 28, 2011 



VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 Vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

High Plain Road at Fish Brook Design and Engineering 

ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, borrowing, or transfer from 
available funds or by any combination and appropriate the sum of $75,000 for the purpose of 
paying design and engineering costs for drainage improvements on High Plain Road at Fish 
Brook, and for the payment of all other costs incidental and related thereto, or take any other 
action related thereto 

On request of the Department of Public Works 

Upon motion duly made and seconded it was VOTED that $75,000 is appropriated to pay costs 
of design and engineering costs for making drainage improvements on High Plain Road at Fish 
Brook, including the payment of any and all costs incidental and related thereto, and that to meet 
this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is authorized to 
borrow such amount under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7(22) of the General Laws, or 
pursuant to any other enabling authority and to issue bonds and notes of the Town therefor. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 Vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Jerry Silverman Fireworks 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will provide funding in the amount of $12,000 for the Jerry 
Silverman Fireworks Program as part of the Fourth of July festivities from available funds, or 
take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion duly made and seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote to transfer from Free 
Cash and appropriate the sum of $12,000 for the Jerry Silverman Fireworks Program as part of 
the Fourth of July festivities. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 27, 28, 2011 



Elderly/Disabled Transportation Program 

ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate and raise by taxation a sum not to 
exceed $12,000 for the purpose of continuing to provide for an elderly and disabled 
transportation subsidy program, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Council on Aging 

Upon motion duly made and seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote to appropriate and raise 
by taxation the sum of $12,000 for the purpose of continuing to provide for an elderly and 
disabled transportation subsidy program. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Insurance Recovery Transfer 

ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to transfer a sum of money from the Insurance 
Proceeds in Excess of $20,000 Account and appropriate it to the Municipal Building/Insurance 
Fund, said sum being the amount received for insurance reimbursement, or take any other action 
related thereto. 

On request of the Finance Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was voted by a Majority vote that Article 29 be 
WITHDRAWN from the Warrant. 

Funding OPEB Trust Fund 

ARTICLE 30. To see what amount the Town will vote to transfer from Free Cash, Water 
Reserves, Sewer Reserves or available funds and appropriate to the Other Post Employment 
Benefit Trust Fund established under the provisions of Chapter 479 of the Acts of 2008, or take 
any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Finance Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote to transfer the sum of 
$100,000 from Water Reserves and the sum of $300,000 from Free Cash and appropriate the 
sum of $400,000 to the Other Post Employment Benefit Trust Fund established under the 
provisions of Chapter 479 of the Acts of 2008 as approved under Article 20 of the 2010 Annual 
Town Meeting. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 27, 28, 2011 



Zoning By-law Amendment - Off-Street Parking Requirements 

ARTICLE 31. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article VIII, the Zoning By-law, 
Appendix A, Table 3 Section 5.1.4. Table of Off-Street Parking Requirements by deleting the 
following text: 



C. Business and Commercial Uses 




3. Personal service establishment 


General Business District: one parking space 
per 250 square feet of gross floor area on 
street level floor; one parking space per 350 
square feet of gross floor area on other floors; 
and one parking space for each 600 square feet 
of gross floor area in basement level floors. 
Other Districts: one parking space per 250 
square feet of gross floor area. 


6. Establishment for the retail sale of 
merchandise 


General Business District: one parking space 
per 250 square feet of gross floor area on 
street level floor; one parking space per 350 
square feet of gross floor area on other floors; 
and one parking space for each 600 square feet 
of gross floor area in basement level floors. 
Other Districts: one parking space per 250 
square feet of gross floor area 


7. Convenience store 


General Business District: one parking space 
per 250 square feet of gross floor area on 
street level floor; one parking space per 350 
square feet of gross floor area on other floors; 
and one parking space for each 600 square feet 
of gross floor area in basement level floors. 
Other Districts: one parking space per 250 
square feet of gross floor area. 


12. Restaurants: 


— 


a. Restaurant, sit-down 


One parking space for each two seats, plus 1.5 
parking spaces for each 2 employees 


b. Restaurant, fast-food 


One parking space for each 200 square feet of 
gross floor area 


15. Business, professional or administrative 
office 


One parking space for each 300 square feet of 
gross floor area. 



and replacing it with: 



C. Business and Commercial Uses 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 27, 28, 2011 



3 . Personal service establishment 


General Business District and Mixed Use 
District: one parking space per 500 square feet 
of gross floor area on street level floor; one 
parking space per 600 square feet of gross 
floor area on other floors, including the 
basement level floors. 
Other Districts: one parking space per 250 
square feet of gross floor area. 


6. Establishment for the retail sale of 
merchandise 


General Business District and Mixed Use 
District: one parking space per 600 square feet 
of gross floor area Other Districts: one parking 
space per 250 square feet of gross floor area 


7. Convenience store 


General Business District and Mixed Use 
District: one parking space per 500 square feet 
of gross floor area on street level floor; one 
parking space per 350 square feet of gross 
floor area on other floors; and one parking 
space for each 600 square feet of gross floor 
area in basement level floors. Other Districts: 
one parking space per 250 square feet of gross 
floor area. 


12. Restaurants: 




a. Restaurant, sit-down 


General Business District and Mixed Use 

District: one parking space per 500 square feet 

of gross floor area plus 1 parking space per 2 

employees. 

Other Districts: One parking space for each 

two seats, plus 1.5 parking spaces for each 2 

employees 


b. Restaurant, fast-food 


General Business District and Mixed Use 

District: one parking space per 500 square feet 

of gross floor area plus 1 parking space per 2 

employees. 

Other Districts: 

One parking space for each 200 square feet of 

gross floor area 


15. Business, professional or administrative 
office 


General Business District: one parking space 
per 300 square feet of gross floor area on 
street level floor; one parking space per 500 
square feet of gross floor area on other floors 
including the basement level floors. 
All other districts: One parking space for each 
300 square feet of gross floor area. 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 27, 28, 2011 



And further that non-substantive changes to the numbering of this by-law be permitted in 
order that it be in compliance with the numbering format of the Andover Code of By-laws, or 
take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Planning Board 

It was duly moved and seconded to approve the Zoning By-law Amendment - Off-Street Parking 
Requirements as printed in Article 31 of the Warrant, and further that non-substantive changes to 
the numbering of this by-law be permitted in order that it be in compliance with the numbering 
format of the Andover Code of By-laws. 

It was duly moved and seconded to amend the main motion as follows: 

"Amend Article 3 1 by restricting its applicability to existing and new buildings for which the 

gross floor area on street level floor is at least ninety percent of the gross floor area on any other 

floor. 

For buildings for which the gross floor area on street level floor is less than ninety percent of the 

gross floor area on any other floor, the current parking space requirements shall continue to 

apply." 

The Moderator called for a vote on the motion to amend the main motion. The Moderator 
declared the motion to amend was defeated for lack of a majority vote in favor of the motion to 
amend. 

The Moderator thereafter took up the main motion as originally moved. The Moderator declared 
the main motion passed by a more than 2/3 vote. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 Vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

At 10:16 PM on Motion of Town Counsel Thomas J. Urbelis, duly made and seconded, it 
was VOTED by a Majority vote to adjourn the meeting to April 28, 2011 at the same hour 
and place. 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - SECOND SESSION - APRIL 28, 2011 

The check lists were used at the entrance and four hundred and one (401) voters admitted to the 
meeting on the second night of the meeting. 

Sheila M. Doherty, Moderator, called the meeting to order at 7:00 P.M. 

Upon majority consent it was VOTED to admit non- voters to the meeting and escort non-voters 
to the non-voting section thereafter. Forty five (45) non- voters were admitted to the meeting 
during the second night of the meeting. 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 27, 28, 2011 



Board of Selectmen Chairman Alex J. Vispoli, recognized the following: 

Anthony Torrisi, Finance Director: Mr. Vispoli announced Mr. Torrisi's planned 
retirement in July and recognized his many years of exceptional service to the Town of Andover. 

Former Selectman Jerry Stabile for his dedicated service on the Board of Selectmen. Mr. 
Stabile was unable to be present. His brother, Fire Lt. Robert Stabile accepted a token of 
appreciation in his place. 

Former Selectman John P. Hess for his many years as a member of the Board of 
Selectman and his willingness to step forward and accept an appointed position on the Board to 
replace Mr. Stabile until the 201 1 annual town election. Mr. Vispoli presented Mr. Hess with a 
token of appreciation. 

Mr. Vispoli was then joined by School Committee Chair Dennis F. Forgue. Mr. Vispoli and Mr. 
Forgue presented the Virginia Cole Community Service Award to Robert (Bob) French for his 
many years of service and contributions to youth basketball in the Town of Andover. 

The Moderator called for a moment of silence for the mid-west tornado victims. 

The Moderator reminded members of the meeting about the time limits voted at the beginning of 
day 1 of the meeting, to limit presenters of articles to five minutes of speaking time and speakers 
to three minutes. 

The Moderator outlined the Rules and Procedures of Town meeting to the Members, including 
that voters must be seated to be counted and must have their voter stickers visible and the use of 
Pro and Con microphones during the meeting. 

The Moderator then took up the Warrant: 

Street Acceptance 

ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to accept and name as a public way any or all of the 
following street: Winterberry Lane: 

Winterberry Lane, as shown on a plan approved by the Andover Planning Board entitled 
"SUBDIVISION PLAN OF LAND IN ANDOVER, MASS. ENTITILED WINTERBERRY 
LANE", dated September 17, 2008 (revised) and recorded in the Essex North District Registry of 
Deeds as Plan Number 16023, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Board of Selectmen 

Upon motion duly made and seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote to accept and name as 
a public way any or all of the following street: Winterberry Lane: 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 27, 28, 2011 



Winterberry Lane, as shown on a plan approved by the Andover Planning Board entitled 
"SUBDIVISION PLAN OF LAND IN ANDOVER, MASS. ENTITLED WINTERBERRY 
LANE", dated September 17, 2008 (revised) and recorded in the Essex North District Registry of 
Deeds as Plan Number 16023. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 

Storm Drain Improvements 

ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, borrowing, or transfer from 
available funds or by any combination and appropriate the sum of $300,000 for the purpose of 
constructing and reconstructing surface drains and the payment of any and all other costs 
incidental and related thereto, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of Department of Public Works 

Uponn motion duly made and seconded it was VOTED that $300,000 is appropriated to pay 
costs of constructing and reconstructing surface drains, including the payment of any and all 
costs incidental and related thereto, and that to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Board of Selectmen, is authorized to borrow such amount under and pursuant to 
Chapter 44, Section 7(1) of the General Laws, or pursuant to any other enabling authority and to 
issue bonds and notes of the Town therefor. 

VOTE: On a standing vote count the Moderator declared the motion passed with 170 in 
favor to 72 opposed, a 2/3 vote being required for passage. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Town Building Maintenance and Renovation 

ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, borrowing, or transfer from 
available funds or by any combination and appropriate the sum of $500,000 for the purpose of 
paying costs of constructing, adding to, remodeling, reconstructing and making extraordinary 
repairs to and equipping various Town buildings and roofs and for the payment of all other costs 
incidental and related, or to take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Acting Director of Plant and Facilities 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that $500,000 is appropriated to pay costs 
of constructing, adding to, remodeling, reconstructing and making extraordinary repairs to and 
equipping various Town buildings and roofs, including the payment of any and all costs 
incidental and related thereto, and that to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Board of Selectmen, is authorized to borrow such amount under and pursuant to 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 27, 28, 2011 



Chapter 44, Section 7(3 A) of the General Laws, or pursuant to any other enabling authority and 
to issue bonds and notes of the Town therefor. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 Vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Zoning By-law Amendment - Dimensional Special Permit/Historic Preservation 

ARTICLE 35. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-law, Article VIII, Section 
7.9.6., Dimensional Special Permit Historic Preservation by deleting the text in the following 
subsections: 

"5. The owner shall record at the Essex North District Registry of Deeds an historic preservation 
restriction in the form approved by the Zoning Board of Appeals, and approved and endorsed by 
the Massachusetts Historical Commission, in accordance with Chapter 184, Section 32, of the 
General Laws, which shall at a minimum provide for conditions under which alterations, 
additions or modifications may be made, and in the event of damage to the historic structure such 
that the historic structure cannot be repaired, the owner may rebuild on the lot, provided that the 
new dwelling does not contain more than the same interior floor area as the historic structure and 
meets one of the following requirements: (i) the new dwelling is placed in the existing footprint; 
or (ii) the new dwelling is built in conformity with the zoning side, front and rear setbacks in 
effect at the time of rebuilding. Any mortgagee shall subordinate its mortgage to this restriction. 

6. When the decision of the Board of Appeals on the application for a dimensional special 
permit for historic preservation has become final, the applicant shall submit the plan upon which 
the decision is based to the Planning Board for certification as an approval not required plan 
pursuant to Chapter 8 1 , Section 41P, of the General Laws. The notice of decision of the Board of 
Appeals, the approved and endorsed historic preservation restriction with any required 
mortgagee subordination, and the approval not required plan certified by the Planning Board 
shall be recorded concurrently at the Essex North District Registry of Deeds." 

and replacing it with: 

"5. The owner shall record at the Essex North District Registry of Deeds an historic preservation 
restriction either in a form approved by the Zoning Board of Appeals, and approved and 
endorsed by the Massachusetts Historical Commission in accordance with Chapter 1 84, Section 
32, of the General Laws, or in a form approved by the Zoning Board of Appeals, the Andover 
Preservation Commission and approved and endorsed by the Board of Selectmen, which shall, at 
a minimum, provide for conditions under which alterations, additions or modifications may be 
made, and in the event of damage to the historic structure such that the historic structure cannot 
be repaired, the owner may rebuild on the lot, provided that the new dwelling does not contain 
more than the same interior floor area as the historic structure and meets one of the following 
requirements: (i) the new dwelling is placed in the existing footprint; or (ii) the new dwelling is 



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ANNEAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 27, 28, 201 1 



built in conformity with the zoning side, front and rear setbacks in effect at the time of 

rebuilding. Any mortgagee shall subordinate its mortgage to this restriction. 

6. When the decision of the Board of Appeals on the application for a dimensional special 
permit for historic preservation has become final, the applicant shall submit the plan upon which 
the decision is based to the Planning Board for certification as an approval not required plan 
pursuant to Chapter 81. Section 41P, of the General Laws. The notice of decision of the Board of 
Appeals, the approved historic preservation restriction with any required mortgagee 
subordination, and the approval not required plan certified by the Planning Board shall be 
recorded concurrently at the Essex North District Registry of Deeds." 

And further that non-substantive changes to the numbering of this by-law be permitted in order 
that it be in compliance with the numbering format of the Andover Code of By-laws, or take any 
other action related thereto. 

On request of the Preservation Commission 

It was moved and seconded to approve the Zoning Bv-law Amendment - Dimensional Special 
Permit Historic Preservation as printed in Article 35 of the Warrant, and further that non- 
substantive changes to the numbering of this by-law be permitted in order that it be in 
compliance with the numbering format of the Andover Code of By-laws. 

VOTE: On a standing vote count the Moderator Declared the motion was DEFEATED by 
a vote of 187 in favor to 151 opposed, a 2/3 vote being required for passage. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Pla nnin g Board Report: Approval 

Balmoral Fence & Masonrv Repairs 

ARTICLE 36. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, transfer from available funds, 
borrowing or by any combination and appropriate the sum of $125,000 for the purpose of paying 
costs of the Balmoral fence and masonry repairs, and for the payment of all other costs incidental 
and related thereto, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Acting Plant and Facilities Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that Article 36 be 
WITHDRAWN from the Warrant. 

Parking Meter Replacement 

ARTICLE 37. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the sum of $90,000 from the Off-Street 
Parking Meter reserve account and appropriate the sum of S90.000 for the purpose of installing 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 27, 28, 2011 



and/or replacing parking meters including costs incidental and related thereto, or take any other 
action related thereto. 

On request of the Police Chief 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that Article 37 be 
WITHDRAWN from the Warrant. 

Spring Grove Cemetery Maintenance 

ARTICLE 38. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the sum of $45,000 from the Spring 
Grove Cemetery Perpetual Care reserve account and appropriate the sum of $45,000 for the 
purpose of cemetery maintenance including costs incidental and related thereto, or take any other 
action related thereto. 

On request of the Acting Plant and Facilities Director 

On motion duly made and seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote to transfer the sum of 
$3 1 ,000 from the Spring Grove Cemetery Perpetual Care reserve account and appropriate the 
sum of $31,000 for the purpose of maintenance and roadway projects at Spring Grove Cemetery 
including costs incidental and related thereto. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

Zoning By-law Amendment - Open Space Residential Design (OSRD) Special Permit 

ARTICLE 39. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article VIII, the Zoning By-law, by 
adding a new Section 7.7 to read as follows: 

7.7 OPEN SPACE RESIDENTIAL DESIGN (OSRD) SPECIAL PERMIT 

7.7.1 The Planning Board may grant a special permit to authorize the development and 
construction of an Open Space Residential Design (OSRD). 

7.7.2 PURPOSE AND INTENT 
The Purpose of this bylaw is: 

1. To allow for greater flexibility and creativity in the design of residential developments; 

2. To encourage the permanent preservation of open space, agricultural land, forestry land, 
wildlife habitat, other natural resources including aquifers, waterbodies and wetlands and 
significant archaeological natural features in a manner that is consistent with Andover's Master 
Plan; 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 27, 28, 2011 

3 . To encourage a more efficient form of development that minimizes site disturbance, decreases 
the economic burden to the Town, consumes less open land and promotes conformity to existing 
topography and natural features ; 

4. To further the goals and policies of the Town of Andover's Master Plan; 

5. To conserve open space, scenic areas, views, streams, recreational opportunities and other 
community assets; 

6. To promote efficiency and economy of street and utility layout; to lessen storm run-off, 
erosion and sedimentation normally associated with more conventional patterns of residential 
development; and to retain natural drainage courses and wetlands; 

7.7.3 ELIGIBILITY 

1 . To be eligible for consideration as an OSRD: 

a. The parcel(s) shall be located in the Residential Districts: SRB and SRC 

b. The minimum parcel(s) area shall be five (5) acres. 

2. Housing Types 

a. Housing Units shall be Single Family detached units. 

b. No common wall or multi- family structures shall be allowed. 

7.7.4 DIMENSIONAL REQUIREMENTS 

1. Frontage 

a. The minimum frontage of any individual lot shall be one hundred feet measured at the 
street line. 

2. Lot Area 

a. All lots on an existing town or public way or lots abutting proposed major street of the 
development shall conform to the frontage and area requirements of the zoning district in 
which the development lies. 

b. The lots located within the OSRD in no case shall have less than two-thirds (2/3) of 
the required lot size for the zoning district in which the development is located and shall 
meet the setback requirements of the district. 

7.7.5 OPEN SPACE REQUIREMENTS: 

1 . A minimum of thirty percent (30%) of the development parcel(s) shall be Open Space. 

2. No more than fifty percent (50%) of the designated open space may be comprised of 
wetlands. 

3. Wastewater and stormwater management systems serving the OSRD may be located within 
the open space. 

4. Ownership of Open Space. The Open Space land shall either be conveyed to the Town of 
Andover Conservation Commission or be conveyed to a non-profit organization, the principal 



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purpose of which is the conservation of open space. In any case, where such land is not conveyed 
to the Town of Andover Conservation Commission, a restriction enforceable by the Town shall 
be recorded providing that such land shall be kept in its open and natural state and not built upon 
for residential use or developed for an accessory use except as provided for herein, such as 
wastewater and stormwater management systems serving the OSRD. In order to insure that the 
corporation, non-profit organization or trust will properly maintain the unsubdivided land or 
open space, an instrument(s) shall be recorded at the Essex North Registry of Deeds. 

7.7.6 APPLICATON PROCESS 

1 . Preliminary Review 

It is recommended that the applicant request a pre-application review at a regular business 
meeting of the Planning Board. 

The purpose of a pre-application review is to introduce the proposed OSRD conceptually to the 
Planning Board at the earliest possible stage in the development, thereby minimizing the 
applicant's need for costly plan revisions. At the pre-application review, the applicant may 
outline the proposed OSRD, seek preliminary feedback from the Planning Board and/or its 
technical experts, and set a timetable for submittal of a formal application. 

7.7.7 PROCEDURES 

1. Application 

An application for a Special Permit for an OSRD shall include a Sketch Plan and Narrative, 
Yield Plan and an application for a Definitive Subdivision in accordance with the Rules and 
Regulations Governing the Subdivision of Land. 

a. Sketch Plan and Narrative. 

The Sketch Plan and Narrative shall be prepared by a multidisciplinary team of which 
members must include a certified Landscape Architect and a certified Civil Engineer, and 
shall show the following: 

General features of the land; 

Configurations of the lots, including locations and sizes (footprints) of the houses; 

Examples and elevations of the home types; 

Open space, and roadways; 

A description of the neighborhood in which the parcel lies, including utilities and other 
public facilities and the local ecosystem, along with the impact of the proposed plan upon 
them; and 

The information listed under the Definitive Subdivision requirements of the Rules and 
Regulations Governing the Subdivision of Land. 

b. Yield Plan 

The Basic Maximum Number of lots allowed in an OSRD development shall be derived 
from a Yield Plan. The Yield Plan shall show the maximum number of lots (or dwelling 



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units) that could be placed upon the site under a conventional subdivision. The Yield 
Plan shall include the following: 

Boundaries, North Point, locus plan, date, scale, legend, names of the record owner and 
applicant, existing and proposed lines of streets, ways, easements and any public areas, proposed 
system of drainage, including adjacent existing natural waterways, boundary lines of lots with 
areas and dimensions, contours of the land, vegetation, rock outcropping, wetlands, streams, 
drainage channels, stone walls and man-mad structures. 

The proponent shall have the burden of proving to the Board's satisfaction the Basic Maximum 
Number of lots (or dwelling units) resulting from the design and engineering specifications 
shown on the Yield Plan In no case shall the total number of proposed lots exceed the number of 
lots which could be constructed under a conventional subdivision plan. 

7.7.8 DESIGN STANDARDS 

1 . At the time of the application for a Special Permit for OSRD applicants are required to 
demonstrate to the Planning Board that the following Design Process was performed by a 
certified Landscape Architect and considered in determining the layout of proposed streets, 
house lots, and open space. 

a. Step One: Identifying Sensitive Areas. 

1. Wetland Areas: all land subject to regulation under applicable State, Federal or 
Municipal law such as wetlands, riverfront areas, and floodplains. 

2. Environmentally Sensitive Areas (including unprotected elements of the natural 
landscape such as steep slopes, mature woodlands, prime farmland, meadows, 
wildlife habitats and cultural features such as historic and archeological sites and 
scenic views) shall be identified and delineated. The Potentially Developable Area 
will be identified and delineated, the Potentially Developable Area shall consist of 
land outside identified Sensitive Areas. 

b. Step Two: Locating House Sites. 

Locate the approximate sites of individual houses within the Potentially Developable 
Area and include the delineation of private yards and shared amenities, so as to reflect an 
integrated community, 

c. Step Three: Aligning the Streets. 

Align streets and driveways in order to access the house lots. 

d. Step Four: Lot Lines. 

Establish lot lines for each of the individual parcels and open space. 

7.7.9 PUBLIC HEARING 

After the opportunity for review by other boards has taken place, the Planning Board shall hold a 
hearing under this section, in conformity with the provisions of G.L. Chapter 40A, S9 and of the 
zoning bylaw and regulations of the Planning Board. 

7.7.10 DECISION OF THE PLANNING BOARD 

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The Planning Board may grant a special permit for a OSRD if it determines that the design of the 
proposed OSRD meets the intent of section 7.1.2 and section 9.4 of this bylaw. In making this 
determination, the Board shall consider the recommendations obtained from other municipal 
Boards and Departments, as well as the following 

1 . Whether the OSRD achieves greater flexibility and creativity in the design of residential 
developments than a conventional plan; 

2. Whether the OSRD promotes permanent preservation of open space, agricultural land forestry 
land, other natural resources including waterbodies and wetlands, 

3. Whether the OSRD promotes a less sprawling and more efficient form of development that 
consumes less open land and better conforms to existing topography and natural features than a 
conventional subdivision; 

4. Whether the OSRD will require less disturbance on the site than a conventional plan; 

5. Whether the OSRD complies with the goals and policies of the open space/ master plan. 

6. Whether the OSRD facilitates the construction and maintenance of streets, utilities, and public 
service in an economical and efficient manner. 

7. Whether the OSRD and its supporting narrative documentation complies with all sections of 
this zoning bylaw. 

8. Whether the granting of such a permit would be detrimental to the health, safety or welfare of 
the neighborhood or Town or inconsistent with the intent of the OSRD bylaw. 

and further that non-substantive changes to the numbering of this by-law be permitted in order 
that it be in compliance with the numbering format of the Andover Code of By-laws, or take any 
other action related thereto. 

On request of the Planning Board 

It was moved and seconded to approve the Zoning By-law Amendment - Open Space 
Residential Design (OSRD) Special Permit as printed in Article 39 of the Warrant, and further 
that non-substantive changes to the numbering of this by-law be permitted in order that it be in 
compliance with the numbering format of the Andover Code of By-laws. 

VOTE: On a standing vote count the Moderator declared the motion was DEFEATED on a 
vote of 114 in favor to 176 opposed, a 2/3 vote being required for passage. 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board Report: Approval 
Conservation Commission Report: Approval 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 27, 28, 2011 



Zoning Bylaw Amendment - River Road Business Overlay District (P) 

ARTICLE 40. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article VIII, the Zoning Bylaw, by (a) 
amending Section 2.2. Overlay Districts by adding "River Road Business Overlay District" at the 
end of Section 2.2; and (b) by amending Section 8.0 Special District Regulations of the Zoning 
Bylaw by adding the following new section "River Road Business Overlay District (RRBOD)" 
and Appendix A, map of the River Road Business Overlay District. The River Road Business 
Overlay District is an overlay district in the vicinity of River Road, Old River Road, and 
Campanelli as shown on a plan entitled "River Road Business Overlay District, as prepared by 
Cube 3 dated January 27, 20 11" attached hereto as Appendix A. This map is hereby made a part 
of the Zoning By-Law and is on file in the Office of the Town Clerk. 

"SECTION 8.7: RIVER ROAD BUSINESS OVERLAY DISTRICT (RRBOD) 

8.7.1 Purpose. It is the purpose of this Section to establish a River Road Business Overlay 
District (RRBOD) to encourage and authorize service-focused development along River Road 
adjacent and to the east of Route 93. This service-focused and mixed-use development in the 
district will be created by means of authorizing and combining a variety of building types and 
uses with conditions and safeguards to prevent detrimental effects and impacts upon neighboring 
land uses and upon the Town of Andover generally so as to provide currently non-existent 
conveniences and services to the underserved residents, business community, and commuters; to 
promote economic development; and increase the production of appropriately scaled and 
designed retail, mixed use, and multifamily development. 

Other objectives of this Section are to: 

1 . To promote retail, and mixed use development that includes creation of the needed 
services to support the surrounding business and residents and to meet existing and 
anticipated area housing needs that will advance a 'live-work' scenario; 

2. Promote the public health, safety, and welfare by residents, company employees and 
commuters to reduce travel time between needed amenities and home and work 

3. To encourage principals of smart growth within the district. Some principals include: 

Proximity to existing development and infrastructure 

Mix and balance of uses 

Site optimization and compactness 

Accessibility and mobility choices 

Community context and site design 

Establishment of pedestrian connections to open space 

Diversity 

Re-use and re-development options 

Process collaboration and predictability of decisions 



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4. Establish requirements, standards, and guidelines, and ensure predictable, fair and 
cost-effective development; 

5. Establish development standards to allow high quality design and creative site 
planning; 

8.7.2 Definitions. For purposes of this Section, the following definitions shall apply. All 
capitalized terms shall be defined in accordance with the definitions established under Section 
10.0 or this Section 8.7. 

Applicant: The individual or entity that submits a Project for Plan Approval. 

As-of-right Project or Project: means a Retail, Office, Multifamily or Mixed Use development 
allowed hereunder without recourse to a special permit, variance, zoning amendment, or other 
form of zoning relief. 

Design Standards: Standards adopted to assure the architectural qualities and appropriate 
density and scale of all Projects. See Section 8.7.9. 

Dwelling Unit: One (1) or more rooms with cooking, living, sanitary and sleeping facilities 
arranged for the use of one (1) or more persons living together as a single housekeeping unit. 

Mixed Use: Any Project containing a residential use and one (1) or more non-residential use(s), 
the same being permitted pursuant to Section 8.7.4. 

Multifamily Dwelling: Dwelling containing four or more dwelling units. 

Plan Approval: Standards and criteria which a Project in the RRBOD must meet under the 
procedures established herein and in the Enabling Laws. 

Plan Approval Authority (PAA): For purposes of reviewing Project applications and issuing 
decisions on Projects within the RRBOD, the Plan Approval Authority (PAA), shall be the 
Planning Board. The PAA is authorized to approve a site plan to implement a Project. 

Plan Review: The review procedure established by this Section 8.7 and administered by the Plan 
Approval Authority. As-of-right Principal and Accessory uses and Projects shall be subject to 
Plan Approval under this Section 8.7. 

Site Plan: A plan depicting a proposed Project for all or a portion of the RRBOD and which is 
submitted to the Plan Approval Authority for its review and approval in accordance with 
provisions of this Bylaw. 

Supermarket: a commercial retail establishment whose principal purpose is to sell a variety of 
day-to-day domestic, household or personal consumption provisions and packaged goods, 
including, but not limited to, the sale of all or one of the following items: household goods, meat 
or food products (prepared, raw, packaged and unpackaged) of all types, bakery goods, 



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newspapers, printed materials, periodicals, pharmaceuticals, dairy products and beverages of 
every variety (including alcoholic beverages if properly licensed to do so) and all other products 
found in a typical large scale grocery store suitable for a family's entire shopping needs. 

Zoning By-law: The Zoning By-law of the Town of Andover applicable to the geographic area in 
which the RRBOD is located as said By-law may from time to time be amended. 

8.7.3 Overlay District. The RRBOD is an overlay district having a land area of approximately 
75 acres, in the vicinity of River Road, Old River Road, and Campanelli as shown on a plan 
entitled "River Road Business Overlay District, as prepared by Cube 3 dated January 27, 2011 
that is superimposed over the underlying zoning districts, as shown on Appendix A, attached 
hereto. This map is hereby made a part of the Zoning By-Law and is on file in the Office of the 
Town Clerk. 

1 . Underlying Zoning. The RRBOD is an overlay district superimposed on all underlying 
zoning districts. The Zoning By-law governing the underlying zoning district(s) shall 
remain in full force and effect except for Projects undergoing development pursuant to 
this Section 8.7. Within the boundaries of the RRBOD a developer may elect to develop a 
project in accordance with the Overlay District Zoning, or to develop a project in 
accordance with the requirements of the regulations for use, dimension and all other 
provisions of the Zoning By-law governing the underlying zoning district(s). 

2. Applicability of RRBOD. An applicant seeking to develop property with the RRBOD 
may seek Plan Approval in accordance with the requirements of this Section 8.7. In such 
case, then notwithstanding anything to the contrary in this Zoning By-Law, such Plan 
Approval shall not be subject to any other provisions of this Zoning By-Law, including 
limitations upon the issuance of building permits for residential uses related to a rate of 
development or phased growth limitation or to a local moratorium on the issuance of such 
permits, or to building permit or dwelling unit limitations. When a building permit is 
issued for any Project approved in accordance with this Section 8.7, the provisions of the 
underlying zoning district(s) shall no longer be applicable to the land shown on the site 
plan which was submitted pursuant to Section 8.7 for such Project. 

8.7.4 Permitted Uses 

1 . Principal Uses. The following uses are permitted as of right in the RRBOD. All 
other uses are prohibited: 

a. Retail; 

b. Mixed Use, which may contain a residential component; 

c. Municipal facilities; 

d. Multifamily Dwelling; 

e. Structured Parking Facilities; 

f. Nonresidential uses, whether within a Mixed Use Project or not, in accordance 
with the following "Table of Non-residential Uses": 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 27, 28, 2011 



Use 


Permissions 




Institutional Uses 




1 . Philanthropic or charitable institution 


BA 




Business and Commercial Uses 




1 . Private club not conducted for profit 


Y 


2. Personal service establishment 


Y 


3. Banking establishment 


Y 


4. Retail sales establishment 


Y 


5. Convenience store 


Y 


6. Non-exempt educational use 


Y 


7. Medical center or clinic 


Y 


8. Self-service laundry or dry-cleaning operation 


Y 


9. Restaurants 




a. Restaurant, sit down 


Y 


b. Restaurant, fast food 


Y 


10. Shop for custom work involving the manufacture of 
articles to be sold on the premises 


Y 


1 1 . Indoor commercial recreation establishment 


Y 


12. Business, professional or administrative office 


Y 


13. Motel or hotel (see Section 4.1.5.1 of the Zoning By- 
Law) 


Y 


14. Commercial parking lot or garage 


Y 


15. Major non-residential project (see Sections 9.4 and 
10.0 of the Zoning By-Law) 


Y 


16. Supermarket 


Y 



Nonresidential use of any building, structure or land within the RRBOD is 
prohibited except as permitted above. For the purposes of the "Table of Non- 
residential Uses," the letter "Y" shall designate that a use requires Plan Approval, 
the letters "BA" shall designate that the use requires a special permit from the 
Board of Appeals and the letters "PB" shall designate that the use requires a 
special permit from the Planning Board. 

2. Accessory Uses. Uses which are subordinate to, clearly incidental to, customary in 
connection with, and located in the same structure a Permitted Principal Use and which 
does not, in effect, constitute conversion of the Permitted Principal Use to a use not 
otherwise permitted in the RRBOD shall be permitted as of right. 



8.7.5 Density. 



1 . Residential. 
Dwelling Units. 



Residential unit count permissible in the RRBOD is capped at 225 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 27, 28, 2011 



2. Nonresidential. The total amount of nonresidential development in the RRBOD shall 
be capped at 500,000 square feet of Gross Floor Area, excluding any Municipal 
Structures and Structured Parking Facility (ies). 

3. Nonresidential - Retail. No individual retail establishment shall exceed 50,000 square 
feet of Gross Floor Area without specific approval of the PAA. 

4. Multiple Buildings. In the RRBOD more than one building may be erected on a single 
lot. 

8.7.6 Dimensional Regulations. 

1 . Building Setback. 

a. Buildings on the South side of River Road with a commercial use on the first floor 
shall be located directly at the 30'-0" front yard setback line. Sidewalk & Hardscape 
areas shall create direct pedestrian connections between the back of sidewalk and 
building edge. These will be primarily pedestrian zones and vehicles are excluded 
other than as required to provide access to the rear parking areas. A 20' 0" side yard 
setback shall apply, but no rear yard setback shall be required. 

b. Buildings on the North side of River Road shall conform to a 30'-0" front yard 
setback. 

c. Buildings to the east of Campanelli Drive shall conform to a 20' -0" side yard 
setback along the easterly boundary of the RRBOD. 

d. No additional restrictions shall apply to front, side, and rear yard setbacks in the 
District. 

2. Height. Building heights shall conform to and be measured according to the standards 
of the Andover Zoning Bylaws, with the following exceptions: 

a. On the North side of River Road, the maximum allowed heights of all buildings in 
the district shall be 35 feet or 3 floors, whichever is less, above the adjacent public 
street within a distance of 90 feet back from the property line. 

b. After 90 feet back from the property line on River Road and to the East of 
Campanelli Drive, the maximum allowed height shall be the maximum of 50 feet or 4 
stories, whichever is less. 

c. After 30 feet back from the property line on River Road and to the West of 
Campanelli Drive, the maximum allowed height shall be the maximum of 50 feet or 4 
stories, whichever is less. 

d. On the South side of River Road, the maximum allowed heights of all buildings in 
the district shall be 30 feet or 2 floors, whichever is less, above the adjacent public 
street. 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 27, 28, 2011 



e. When a building facade extends more than 100 feet across a grade that changes 10 
feet or more in elevation, the maximum height shall be determined from the average 
grade across each 1 00 foot increment. 

f. No additional restrictions shall apply to buildings fronting on Campanelli Drive, 
Old River Road, or to any new roads created within the district. 

g. The height of any building in the Proposed Overlay District shall be the vertical 
distance measured from the average finished grade adjacent to said building 
(exclusive of basements) and the ceiling of the upper-most occupied space in the 
building in the case of flat roofs and in the case of buildings with pitched roofs, at the 
point at which the ceiling intersects the exterior portion of the buildings. The 
calculation of building height shall not apply to roof tanks and their supports, 
ventilating, air conditioning and similar service equipment, chimneys, railings, and 
other similar features of buildings which are in no way designed for occupancy or use 
nor to the portion of a pitched roof above the intersection of the ceiling of the upper- 
most occupied space in the building. 

3. Coverage. Maximum coverage in the Proposed Overlay District shall be 75% 
measured as to the total area of Developable Acres in the Proposed Overlay District. 

4. Parcel Size. The minimum parcel size required for a Development Project shall be one 
half (1/2) acres. 

8.7.7 Performance Standards 

1. Driveways. The number of curb cuts on state roads and River Road shall be 
minimized. 

2. Interior Design. Projects shall assure safe interior circulation within its site by 
allowing for the separation of pedestrian, bicycle and motor vehicle traffic. 

3. Noise. Any Project in the RRBOD shall comply with 310 CMR 31.07, as may be 
amended. 

8.7.8 Design Standards and Guidelines 

1. General. In order to establish the RRBOD 's architectural and site qualities, Projects 
shall comply with the Design Standards adopted by the PAA, except where a specific 
waiver is granted. The PAA may also adopt Design Guidelines which are intended to be 
applied flexibly as part of the Plan Approval process. The Design Standards and 
Guidelines may address the following features of the Project: 

Architectural elements, including: 

a. Building height; 

b. Massing of buildings, building separation, building location and gateways to the 
RRBOD; 



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aVM'aL TQW>~ MEETING - APRIL 2". IS. 2011 



v 



i " 






n; 



.1 



ipt, :; majority vote, reasonable. Design 



: ±e PAA's rules and 

"re : : t.v = ir: 






>r signs, and 
\. ? s rules and 



1. Off-Street Parking and Loading Requirement 



hat is constructed, 
rotation of parking 



;-- 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 27, 28, 2011 



Residential uses 1.5 space per unit 

Nonresidential uses 3 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. of gross floor area 

2. Allowance. The PAA may make an allowance for up to 15% reduction with shared 
parking. 

3. Computation of Spaces. When the computation of required parking or loading spaces 
results in the requirement of fractional space, any fraction over one-half shall require one 
space. 

4. Location of Loading Spaces. Any loading spaces required shall in all cases be on the 
same lot as the use they are intended to serve. In no case shall the required loading spaces 
be part of the area used to satisfy the parking requirements of this by-law. 

8.7.10 Application for Plan Approval 

Except as otherwise provided in this Section 8.7, the application requirements and 
content for Plan Review and Plan Approval shall conform to Sections 9.5.3 and 9.5.4 of 
the Zoning Bylaw. The Plan Review process encompasses the following: 

1. Pre-Application. Prior to the submittal of a Plan Approval submission, a "Concept 
Plan" may be submitted to help guide the development of the definitive site plan for the 
proposed Project buildout and individual elements thereof. Such Concept Plan should 
reflect the following: 

a. Overall building envelope areas; 

b. Areas which shall remain undeveloped; 

c. General site improvements, groupings of buildings, and proposed land uses. 

The Concept Plan is intended to be used as a tool for both the Applicant and the PAA to 
ensure that the proposed Project design will be consistent with the Design Standards and 
the other requirements of the RRBOD. 

2. Application. An application for Plan Approval shall be submitted to the PAA on the 
form provided by the PAA. An application shall show the proposed buildout of the entire 
Project, whether the Project will be phased or not. 

3. Required Submittals. The application for Plan Approval shall be accompanied by the 
following plans and documents: 

a. Properly executed application form, a certified list of abutters and the costs of 
publication and notice to abutters of the public hearing on the application; 

b. A filing fee in an amount established by the PAA and incorporated into the rules 
and regulations of the PAA relative to the application requirements for Plan Review 
and Plan Approval to cover Town administrative costs. 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 27, 28, 2011 



c. List of any requested waivers from the requirements of this Section 8.7, as limited 
under Section 8.7.13, including a detailed explanation/justification of the reason for 
such request. 

d. A site plan, prepared by a registered professional architect, registered civil 
engineer or a professional landscape architect, drawn at a scale of one (1) inch equals 
forty (40) feet, containing the following information: (a) date; (b) North arrow; (c) 
name and address of the owner; (d) name and address of the designer; (e) locus plan; 
(f) lot lines and setbacks; (g) adjacent streets and ways; (h) owners and uses of 
abutting lots; (i) zoning district boundaries; (j) wetlands and wetlands buffers, as 
shown on maps entitled "Wetlands Areas of Andover, Massachusetts" available from 
the Conservation Commission; (k) all existing and proposed topography at two-foot 
intervals; (1) all test boring sites, keyed to accompanying documentation of results; 
(m) all existing and proposed buildings, structures, parking and loading areas (with 
dimensional notations), driveways, walkways, signs, fences and refuse collection 
areas; (n) all existing structures and/or pavement to be removed or demolished; (o) all 
utilities, including waterline locations, sewer line locations and profiles, and storm 
drainage systems; and (p) all areas designated as easements, conservation restriction 
areas or open space, if applicable, and any provision for pedestrian/bicycle 
accessways connecting to adjacent open space, neighborhoods, schools, recreation 
areas or transportation facilities and for alternative transit programs. 

e. A separate plan drawn at the same scale, showing landscaping and lighting details. 

f. Written statement detailing the size of the lot(s), the proposed use, parking 
calculations, building footprint coverage and calculations of volume of earth to be 
moved and removed. 

g. A transportation plan, consisting of the following information: 

(i) A plan showing the proposed parking, loading, traffic and pedestrian 
circulation within the site; access and egress points; and other features related to 
traffic generated by the proposed use. A minimum of two access and egress points 
are required for each Project. 

(ii) A traffic study, prepared by a qualified traffic engineer, detailing the expected 
traffic impacts. The required traffic study shall substantially conform to the 
Institute of Transportation Engineers' "Traffic Access and Impact Studies for Site 
Development: A Recommended Practice," latest edition. The PAA shall approve 
the geographic scope and content of the study. In addition, the Applicant shall 
submit a Transportation Demand Management (TDM) plan tailored to the specific 
uses and the geographic location of the site. 

(iii) Proposed mitigation measures, if any, including vehicle trip reduction from 
the Project. 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 27, 28, 2011 



8.7.11 Procedures. 



1. Filing. An Applicant for Plan Approval shall file the application and all required 
submittals with the Town Clerk for certification of the date and time of filing, and shall 
also file forthwith twelve (12) copies of the application and the other required submittals 
with the P AA including notice of the date of filing with the Town Clerk. 

2. Circulation to Other Boards. Upon receipt of the Application, the PAA shall 
immediately provide a copy of the application materials to the Board of Selectmen, 
Zoning Board of Appeals, Board of Health, Conservation Commission, Fire Department, 
Police Department, Inspector of Buildings, Department of Public Works, and other 
municipal officers, agencies or boards designated by the PAA for comment, and any such 
board, agency or officer shall provide any written comments within 30 days of its receipt 
of a copy of the plan and application for approval. 

3. Hearing. The PAA shall hold a public hearing for which notice has been given as 
provided in G.L. Chapter 40A, Section 11. The decision of the PAA shall be made, and a 
written notice of the decision filed with the Town Clerk, within 120 days of the receipt of 
the application by the Town Clerk. The required time limits for such action may be 
extended by written agreement between the Applicant and the PAA, with a copy of such 
agreement being filed in the office of the Town Clerk. Failure of the PAA to take action 
within said 120 days or extended time, if applicable, shall be deemed to be an approval of 
the application and site plan. 

4. Peer Review. In addition to the application fee, the Applicant shall be required to pay 
for reasonable consulting fees to provide peer review of the Plan Approval application. 
The amount of the peer review fees and the method and time of payment thereof shall be 
established by the PAA and be incorporated in the rules and regulations adopted by the 
PAA relative to the application requirements for Plan Review and Plan Approval. Such 
fees shall be held by the Town in a separate account and used only for expenses 
associated with the review of the application by outside consultants, including, but not 
limited to, attorneys, engineers, urban designers, housing consultants, planners, and 
others. Any surplus remaining after the completion of such review, including any interest 
accrued, shall be returned to the Applicant. 



8.7.12 Decision 



1 . Waivers. Except where expressly prohibited herein, upon the request of the Applicant 
the Plan Approval Authority may waive dimensional and other requirements of Section 
8.7, including the Design Standards, in the interests of design flexibility and overall 
project quality, and upon a finding of consistency of such variation with the overall 
purpose and objectives of the RRBOD, or if it finds that such waiver will allow the 
Project to achieve the density, affordability, mix of uses, and/or physical character 
allowable under this Section. 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 27, 28, 2011 



2. Plan Review. An Application for Plan Approval shall be reviewed for consistency 
with the purpose and intent of this Section, and such Plan Review and shall be construed 
as an as-of-right review and approval process as required by and in accordance with this 
Section 8.7. 

3. Plan Approval. Plan Approval shall be granted by a simple majority where the PAA 
finds that: 

a. The Applicant has submitted the required fees and information as set forth herein 
or in the applicable PAA rules and regulations; and 

b. The proposed Project and site plan meet the requirements and standards set forth 
this Section 8.7, the applicable Design Standards and the PAA's rules and 
regulations, or a waiver has been granted therefrom; 

c. Extraordinary adverse potential impacts of the Project on nearby properties have 
been adequately mitigated by means of suitable conditions. The PAA may attach 
conditions to the Plan Approval decision that are necessary to insure substantial 
compliance with this Section or to mitigate any extraordinary adverse impacts of the 
Project on nearby properties; and 

d. For a Project subject to the Affordability requirements of this Section, written 
confirmation has been provided by the Monitoring Agent that all requirements of this 
Section have been satisfied, 

4. Plan Disapproval. A site plan may be disapproved only where the PAA finds that: 

a. The Applicant has not submitted the required fees and information as set forth 
herein; or 

b. The Project and site plan do not meet the requirements and standards set forth this 
Section 8.7, or a waiver has not been granted therefrom; or 

c. It is not possible to adequately mitigate significant adverse project impacts on 
nearby properties by means of suitable conditions. 

5. Form of Decision. All decisions of the PAA shall be by a majority vote of the members 
present and voting. The PAA shall issue to the Applicant a copy of its decision 
containing the name and address of the owner, identifying the land affected, and the plans 
that were the subject of the decision, and certifying that a copy of the decision has been 
filed with the Town Clerk and that all plans referred to in the decision are on file with the 
PAA. If twenty (20) days have elapsed after the decision has been filed in the office of 
the Town Clerk without an appeal having been filed or if such appeal, having been filed, 
is dismissed or denied, the Town Clerk shall so certify on a copy of the decision. A copy 
of the decision shall be provided to the Inspector of Buildings. A copy of the decision or 
application bearing such certification shall be recorded in the Essex North District 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 27, 28, 2011 



Registry of Deeds and indexed in the grantor index under the name of the owner of 
record or recorded and noted on the owner's certificate of title. The fee for recording or 
registering shall be paid by the Applicant. 



8.7.13 Change in Plans after Approval by PAA 

1. Minor Change. After Plan Approval, an Applicant may be apply to make minor 
changes involving minor utility or building orientation adjustments, or minor adjustments 
to parking or other site details that do not affect the overall buildout or building envelope 
of the site, or provision of open space, or number of housing units. Such minor changes 
must be submitted to the PAA on redlined prints of the approved plan, reflecting the 
proposed change, and on application forms provided by the PAA. The PAA may 
authorize such changes at any regularly scheduled meeting, without the need to hold a 
public hearing. The PAA shall set forth any decision to approve or deny such minor 
change by motion and written decision, and provide a copy to the Applicant for filing 
with the Town Clerk. A copy of the decision shall be provided to the Inspector of 
Buildings and recorded in the Essex North District Registry of Deeds. 

2. Major Change. Those changes deemed by the PAA to constitute a major change 
because of the nature of the change in relation to the prior approved plan, or because such 
change cannot be appropriately characterized as a minor change as described above, shall 
be processed by the PAA as a new application for Plan Approval pursuant to this Section. 

8.7.14 Enforcement; Appeal. The provisions of the RRBOD shall be administered and 
enforced by the Zoning Enforcement Officer, except as otherwise provided herein. Any appeal 
arising out of action by the PPA regarding an application for Plan Approval decision for a 
Project shall be governed by G.L. c. 40A, §17. 

8.7.15 Severability. If any provision of this Section 8.7 is found to be invalid by a court of 
competent jurisdiction, the remainder of Section 8.7 shall remain in full force. The 
invalidity of any provision of this Section 8.7 shall not affect the validity of the remainder 
of the Town's Zoning By-Law. 

APPENDIX 

A. MAP OF THE RRBOD 

And further that non-substantive changes to the numbering of this by-law be permitted in 
order that it be in compliance with the numbering format of the Andover Code of By-laws, or 
take any other action related thereto. 

On petition of Mark E. Tully and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that Article 40 be 
WITHDRAWN from the Warrant. 



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aVNTaL TC^YN MEETING - APRIL 2". 2S. 2011 

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VQTE: Declared more than a 2 3 Vote by the Moderator A 2 3 vote required 



.-■/. 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 27, 28, 2011 



Water & Sewer Vehicles 

ARTICLE 43. To see if the Town will vote to raise by taxation, borrowing, or transfer from 
available funds or by any combination and appropriate the sum of $70,000 for the purpose of 
purchasing water and sewer vehicles, or to take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Department of Public Works 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote to transfer the sum of 
$35,000 from Water reserves and $35,000 from Sewer reserves and appropriate $70,000 for the 
purpose of purchasing vehicles for the water and sewer divisions. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

WTP Variable Frequency Drive Pump 

ARTICLE 44. To see if the Town will vote to raise by borrowing, or transfer from available 
funds or by any combination and appropriate the sum of $500,000 for the purpose of paying 
costs of acquiring and installing a Variable Frequency Drive Pump at the Water Treatment Plant, 
or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Department of Public Works 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED that the sum of $499,099.95 is 
appropriated to pay costs of replacing a Variable Frequency Drive Pump at the Water Treatment 
Plant, including the payment of any and all costs incidental and related thereto, and that to meet 
this appropriation the town transfer the sum of $59,099.95 from the following town meeting 
articles: 

Article 34, 2005 Water Plant Improvements $ 1 ,657.66 

Article 41, 2005 Fish Brook Pumping Station $16,173.89 

Article 55, 2005 Salt Study $756.88 

Article 35, 2007 Water Vehicle Replacement $ 1 64.65 

Article 54, 2007 Salt Balance Study $14,576.42 

Article 12, 2008 Fish Brook Pumping Station $25,770.45 

$59,099.95 

and, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, is authorized to borrow the sum 
of $440,000 under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 8(7C) of the General Laws, or pursuant 
to any other enabling authority and to issue bonds and notes of the Town therefor. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 Vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 27, 28, 2011 



Acceptance of Ch. 131, Section 27 & 28 of the Acts of 2010, 

ARTICLE 45. To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of Chapter 131, Sections 27 
and 28, of the Acts of 2010 to amend Massachusetts General Laws, Chapter 32, Section 101, to 
increase the benefit provided therein to $9,000.00 per year, or take any other action related 
thereto. 

On request of the Andover Retirement Board 

Upon motion duly made and seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote to accept the 
provisions of Chapter 131, Sections 27 and 28, of the Acts of 2010 to amend Massachusetts 
General Laws, Chapter 32, Section 101, to increase the benefit provided therein to $9,000 per 
year. 

Finance Committee Report: Approval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 

General Bylaw Amendment - Bow Hunting Ban (P) 

ARTICLE 46. To see if the Town will vote to add a new Section 8 to the General 
Miscellaneous By-law as follows: 

"Section 8: No person shall discharge or release an arrow from a bow or crossbow, or hunt or 
trap on any public property in the Town of Andover; provided, however, that the provisions of 
this By-law shall not apply to a law enforcement official in the performance of his or her duties, 
not a class in archery instruction or competition, nor the lawful defense of the person, family, or 
property of any citizen, nor when discharge has been specifically authorized by the 
Commonwealth on State-owned property. The Town of Andover shall post notices summarizing 
the contents of this By-law at selected entrances to Town conservation land in a manner that the 
Conservation Commission determines to be appropriate to carry out this By-law's provisions." 

or take any other action related thereto. 

On petition of Deborah Day Cummings and others 

It was duly moved and seconded to amend the Town of Andover Code of Bylaws, Article XII 
Miscellaneous Bylaws, by adding the following paragraph to Section 7 "Hunting": 

"No person shall discharge or release an arrow from a bow or crossbow, or hunt on any public 
property in the Town of Andover; provided, however, that the provisions of this By-law shall not 
apply to a law enforcement official in the performance of his or her duties, nor a class in archery 
instruction or competition, nor the lawful defense of the person, family, or property of any 
citizen, nor when discharge has been specifically authorized by the Commonwealth on State- 
owned property. The Town of Andover shall post notices summarizing the contents of this By- 
law at selected entrances to Town conservation land in a manner that the Conservation 
Commission determines to be appropriate to carry out this By-law's provisions." 



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ANNUAL TOWN MEETING - APRIL 27, 28, 2011 



and further that non-substantive changes to the numbering of this by-law be permitted in order 
that it be in compliance with the numbering format of the Andover Code of By-laws. 

The Moderator declared on a hand count that those opposed to the motion clearly outnumbered 
those in favor. The Moderator declared that the motion was DEFEATED. 

Finance Committee Report: Disapproval 
Board of Selectmen Report: Disapproval 
Conservation Commission: Disapproval 
Health Department: Disapproval 

Zoning By-law Amendment - Political Signs 

ARTICLE 47. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article VIII, the Zoning By-law, by 
deleting the contents of Section 5.2.7.1.d and replacing it with "Except for political signs in 
Section 5. 2. 7.2. c below, temporary signs may be installed or in place for a period not to exceed 
thirty (30) days unless otherwise specified in this Bylaw" and further that non-substantive 
changes to the numbering of this by-law be permitted in order that it be in compliance with the 
numbering format of the Andover Code of By-laws, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Planning Department 

Upon motion duly made and seconded it was VOTED to approve the Zoning By-law 
Amendment - Political Signs as printed in Article 47 of the Warrant, and further that non- 
substantive changes to the numbering of this by-law be permitted in order that it be in 
compliance with the numbering format of the Andover Code of By-laws. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 Vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Board of Selectmen Report: Approval 
Planning Board: Approval 

On motion of Town Counsel, Thomas Urbelis, duly made and seconded it was voted by a 
Majority vote to dissolve the Annual Town Meeting at 9:11 P.M. 

A true record 
ATTEST 



Lawrence J. Murphy 
Town Clerk 



183 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - DECEMBER 5, 2011 



WARRANT ARTICLE 
NUMBER & DESCRIPTION 



3 . Andover Youth Center Appropriation 

4. Andover Youth Center - Transfer of Land 

5. Blanchard Street Soccer and Baseball Fields 

6. Supplemental Budget Appropriation 

7. Stabilization Fund 

8. Funding OPEB Trust Fund 



ACTION 
TAKEN 



1 . Form for Submitting Warrant Articles and Petitions Approval 

2. Bancroft Elementary School Project - Acquisition of Approval 
Four Temporary Easements for the Construction of Amended 
West Knoll Road 



Approval 

Approval 

Approval 

Approval 

Withdrawn 

Withdrawn 



ATTY. GENERAL 
APPROVED 

December 9, 2011 
Posted Dec. 14,2011 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING WARRANT - December 5, 2011 

Agreeably to a warrant signed by the Selectmen, on November 7, 201 1, notifying and warning 
the Inhabitants of said Town who are qualified to vote in the Town Affairs to meet and assemble 
in the J. Everett Collins Center at Andover High School, Shawsheen Road, in said Andover, on 

Monday December 5, 2011 

at seven o'clock P.M. to act upon the following articles: 

Pursuant to the foregoing Warrant, I, the subscriber, one of the Constables of the Town of 
Andover, have notified the Inhabitants of said Town to meet at the time and place and for the 
purposes stated in said Warrant, by posting a true and attested copy of the same on the Town 
Hall, on each schoolhouse, and in no less than five other public places where bills and notices are 
usually posted and by publication in the Andover Townsman . Said Warrants have been posted 
and published fourteen days. 



November 15, 2011 



Ronald Bertheim, Constable 



184 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - DECEMBER 5, 2011 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING December 5, 2011 

The checklists were used at the entrance and showed two thousand and thirty seven (2,037) 
voters were admitted to the meeting. 

The meeting was called to order at 7:56 P.M. by Sheila M. Doherty, Moderator. Due to heavy 
voter turnout the call to order was delayed while arrangements were made for seating voters. 
Voters were seated on the stage of the J. Everett Collins Center behind the Moderator and Town 
officials as well as in the orchestra well in front of the stage. Overflow seating was provided in 
the Andover High School cafeteria. Video and audio feeds to the cafeteria were provided in the 
cafeteria so that voters in the cafeteria could hear and see the proceedings in the Center. Robert 
Hughes of 5 Durham Drive was appointed by the Moderator to preside in the cafeteria. A 
microphone was provided for communication with the J. Everett Collins Center. Voters in the 
cafeteria were able to ask questions and address all of the Town Meeting members. 

The Invocation was given by the Moderator 

The Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag was led by Brian P. Major, Chairman of the Board of 
Selectmen. 

Andover High School student Emily Wivell of 1 1 Chandler Circle sang the National Anthem. 

The Moderator announced various house keeping issues to the meeting members, including 
turning off cell phones, and that no smoking, food or drink is permitted, except for water. 

Upon motion made and duly seconded, it was VOTED by unanimous consent to dispense with 
the return of service and that the Moderator refer to the warrant articles by number and subject 
matter. 

The Moderator announced the seating sections, introduced the stage participants and announced 
the locations of microphones for pro and con positions. 

The Moderator explained the role of the Ombudsman, Christopher Vrountas, Esq., and reminded 
voters that the Ombudsman would help them with questions on Town Meeting procedures and 
amendments to articles. 

The Moderator took a vote of the meeting members to limit presentations to five minutes and 
speakers to three minutes. The vote passed by a Majority vote. 

The Moderator announced that meeting members must be seated to be counted and they must 
have their voting stickers visible. 

The Moderator discussed motions to move the question and the procedure for motions to amend 
a main motion. 

The Moderator then took up the Warrant Articles in order. 



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SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - DECEMBER 5. 2011 



Form for Submitting Warrant Articles and Petitions 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article II of the Town By-laws by adding 
the following Section: 

12. All petitions to call a Special Town Meeting or to insert a subject in the Warrant for any 
Annual or Special Town Meeting shall be submitted on a form meeting the following 
requirements: 

(a) The subject to be inserted in the Warrant shall be prepared by the petitioner(s) and shall 
appear on the front page of each petition. If space is insufficient the text shall begin on 
the front page of each petition and be continued on additional pages to be attached to 
each petition before signatures are gathered. 

(b) Each petition shall include boxes for the gathering of signatures, with residence, street 
and number, of registered voters of the Town of Andover on the front and/or the back of 
the petition. Separate signature pages shall not be accepted for filing, nor shall they be 
stapled or otherwise attached to a petition. All signatures submitted for certification must 
appear on the petition with the text of the subject to be inserted in the Warrant. The 
petitioner(s) may submit as many petitions as necessary to meet the required number of 
signatures. 

(c) The Town Clerk shall prepare and make available to the public petition forms meeting 
the minimum requirements of this bylaw. 

And further that non- substantive changes to the numbering of this By-law be permitted in order 
that it be in compliance with the numbering format of the Andover Code of By-laws, or take any 
other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Clerk 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote to approve Article 1 as 

printed in the Warrant. 

Selectmen: Recommend Approval 

Bancroft Elementary School Project - Acquisition of Four Temporary Easements for the 

Construction of West Knoll Road 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to acquire by purchase, 
gift or eminent domain temporary' construction easements for the purpose of construction of 
improvements to West Knoll Road and installation of utilities for the Bancroft Elementary 
School Construction Project, on terms and conditions deemed by the Board of Selectmen to be in 
the best interests of the Town, on property located at West Knoll Road as shown on a plan titled 
"Easement Plan of Land in Andover, Massachusetts, West Knoll Road, Scale 1" = 40', Date: 
October 25, 2011," drawn by Dana F. Perkins, Inc., Consulting Engineers & Land Surveyors, 



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SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - DECEMBER 5. 2011 

Tewksbury, Massachusetts 01876, on file with the Town Clerk's Office, which easements are 
more particularly described as follows: 

Easement shown on said Plan as "Temporary Construction Easement #1 - Variable Width Area 
= 1,893 sf ±" on land now or formerly of Thomas M. & Donna D. Garesche, 14 West Knoll 
Road, Map: 59, Lot: 10A; Easement shown on said Plan as "Temporary Construction Easement 
#2 - Variable Width Area = 4,438 sf ±" on land now or formerly of Jill A. Langston Nominee 
Trust No. 1,16 West Knoll Road, Map: 59, Lot: 10; Easement shown on said Plan as Temporary 
Construction Easement #3 - Variable Width Area = 4,186 sf ±" on land now or formerly of H. 
Hammond Barnes & Jane F. Cross, 17 West Knoll Road, Map: 60, Lot: 4; and Easement shown 
on said Plan as "Temporary Construction Easement #4 - Variable Width Area = 2,985 sf ±" on 
land now or formerly of Robert M. & Joan B. Saunders, 15 West Knoll Road, Map: 60, Lot: 1, 
prepared for Town of Andover, 

and to appropriate funds and pay the owners of said property for said temporary easements, 
or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the School Building Committee 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that the Town vote to approve Article 2 as 
printed in the Warrant with the deletion of the words "and to appropriate funds and pay the 
owners of said property for said temporary easements, or take any other action related thereto." 

Suzanne Kendrick, 8 Forbes Lane, moved to amend the main motion to state that once the 
Selectmen have obtained these temporary easements, they shall have no longer than two years to 
complete the work before the easements lapse. The motion was duly seconded. 

On a standing count the Moderator declared that the motion to amend the main motion passed by 
a vote of 890 in favor to 673 opposed. 

The Moderator then took up the main motion as amended 

VOTE on amended main motion: Declared more than a 2/3 Vote by the Moderator 
A 2/3 vote required 

Selectmen: Recommend Approval 
Finance Committee: Recommend Approval 
School Committee: Recommend Approval 

Andover Youth Center Appropriation 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate and borrow or transfer from available 
funds the sum of Two Million Dollars ($2,000,000) to pay costs of designing, constructing and 
furnishing a Youth Center (approximately 20,000 square feet), including the payment of costs of 
a related parking area and all other costs incidental and related thereto (the "Project") behind the 
Doherty Middle School on Bartlet Street provided that the Selectmen have received at least Two 



187 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - DECEMBER 5, 2011 

Million Two Hundred Thousand Dollars ($2,200,000) as a grant from the Andover Youth 
Foundation to pay costs of the Project on terms and conditions the Selectmen deem to be in best 
interests of the Town, or take any other action related thereto. 

On petition of Diane Costagliola and others 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was moved that the sum of Two Million Dollars 
($2,000,000) is appropriated to pay costs of designing, constructing and furnishing a youth center 
(approximately 20,000 square feet), including the payment of costs of a related parking area and 
all other costs incidental or related thereto (the "Project") behind the Doherty Middle School on 
Bartlet Street provided that the Selectmen have received at least Two Million Two Hundred 
Thousand Dollars ($2,200,000) as a grant from the Andover Youth Foundation to pay costs of 
the Project on terms and conditions the Selectmen deem to be in the best interests of the Town, 
and that to meet this appropriation, the Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, is 
authorized to borrow $2,000,000 under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 7(3) of the General 
Laws, or pursuant to any other enabling authority, and to issue bonds or notes of the Town 
therefor. 

Donal Coleman, 9 1 High Street, moved for a secret ballot. The motion was duly seconded. The 
Moderator called for a show of hands of all those in favor. Fifteen voters raised their hands. The 
Moderator declared the motion failed for failure to gain the necessary votes of 25% of the 
meeting members. 

The Moderator then took up the main motion. 

VOTE: On a standing count the Moderator declared the main motion passed by a vote of 1,422 in 
favor to 401 opposed. A 2/3 vote required 

Selectmen: Recommend Approval 
Finance Committee: Recommend Approval 
Planning Board: Recommend Approval 
School Committee: Recommend Approval 
Council on Aging: Recommend Disapproval 

Andover Youth Center - Transfer of Land 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the care, custody, control and 
management of a parcel of land containing approximately 36,400 square feet more or less as 
shown on a plan entitled "Plan Showing Proposed Youth Center" scale 1" = 40', dated 
November 14, 2006 to the Board of Selectmen for municipal purposes, said plan being on file in 
the office of the Town Clerk, and if a Youth Center is not built on said property then the land 
shall revert back to the School Committee with the purpose of this vote being to delete and 
correct the scrivener's error referencing "Parcel A" in the vote on Article 24 of the 2007 Annual 
Town Meeting, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 



188 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - DECEMBER 5, 2011 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 4 as printed in the 
Warrant. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 Vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 

Selectmen: Recommend Approval 
Planning Board: Recommend Approval 
School Committee: Recommend Approval 



Blanchard Street Soccer and Baseball Fields 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will authorize the Selectmen to accept gifts and grants and to 
enter into leases relating to the baseball and soccer fields to be constructed at the Town property 
on Blanchard Street all on terms and conditions the Selectmen determine to be in the best interest 
of the Town, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Town Manager 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED to approve Article 5 as printed in the 
Warrant. 

VOTE: Declared more than a 2/3 Vote by the Moderator A 2/3 vote required 



Selectmen: Recommend Approval 
Finance Committee: Recommend Approval 

Supplemental Budget Appropriation 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money from taxation or 
available funds to supplement appropriations voted at the April 2011 Annual Town meeting, or 
take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Finance Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote to appropriate the sum 
of $500,000 from taxation to the Reserve Fund. 

Selectmen: Recommend Approval 
Finance Committee: Recommend Approval 

Stabilization Fund 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money from taxation or 
available funds to the Stabilization Fund in accordance with MGL Chapter 40, Section 5B, as 



189 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - DECEMBER 5, 2011 



amended by Chapter 46, Sections 14 and 50 of the Acts of 2003, for the purpose of funding 
future one-time or unforeseen costs of the Town, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Finance Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that Article 7 be 
WITHDRAWN from the Warrant. 

Funding OPEB Trust Fund 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate a sum of money from taxation or 
available funds to the Other Post Employment Benefit Trust Fund established under the 
provisions of Chapter 479 of the Acts of 2008, or take any other action related thereto. 

On request of the Finance Director 

Upon motion made and duly seconded it was VOTED by a Majority vote that Article 8 be 
WITHDRAWN from the Warrant. 

Upon motion made by Town Counsel Thomas Urbelis and duly seconded it was voted by a 
Majority vote to dissolve the Special Town Meeting at 9:55 P.M. 

A true record 

ATTEST 



Lawrence J. Murphy 
Town Clerk 



190